Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

Ecology and Evolution 11216486 - Class Notes - Week 9

Created by: Stephanie Walsh Elite Notetaker

> > > > Ecology and Evolution 11216486 - Class Notes - Week 9

Ecology and Evolution 11216486 - Class Notes - Week 9

Department: OTHER
Course: PRINC OF EVOLUTION
Professor: P. SMOUSE
Term: Spring 2018
Tags: Biology and evolution
Name: Week 9 notes
Description: These notes cover Biodiversity and Mutational Variation
Uploaded: 02/26/2018
This preview shows pages 1 - 4 of a 13 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image To start using this template, click “File” -- “Make a Copy”     02/15/2018  COURSE ### Principles of Evolution    ____________________________________________________________________________
____ 
From previous sections     - Term/Concept ​ -  Motivation, Historical Examples, Composition of Regional  Biotas,Ecological Approaches,     
____________________________________________________________________________
____ 
Chapter 07: Biodiversity and Evolution   - Term ​ - Motivation  - Term ​ - Patterns of Origin & Extinction   - More explanation  - Incredible variety of life on the planet. Why? Why is there more diversity  at the equator than at the poles? More diversity at the tropical vs dessert?  Why do we have more diversity at the bottom of the ocean than at the  top?   - Ecological vs Evolutionary Measurements: ​ There are two approaches  to the biodiversity issue, on ecologic the other evolutionary. They Are  related approaches. Ecologist is concerned with what is out there now,  and how it changes in contemporary time. Evolutionary biology is  concerned with what has happened over the last 3.5 bYA.  - Ecological  ​An ecologist goes out to a pound, lake, a forest  inventory plot and tallies the different species with a certain group,  say insects or fungi, or trees ,or orchids . There are problems with  finding everything and the sheer taxonomic challenge is  formidable but one can compare the biodiversity of different places  and situations.   - Evolutionary ​ A student of evolution has to be more indirect. Both  the time and spatial coverage are much larger, so one ends up  collecting records of taxa that have been found form musea,  herbaria, and published reports in several different literatures. The 
background image To start using this template, click “File” -- “Make a Copy”     02/15/2018  catalogue is always incomplete and imperfect and there are  several different taxonomic styles involved.   - Ecological approaches ​: Let us being with the ecological approach,  because that is driven by its own important interests. In a given locality,  the species present are a subset of hose available from the surrounding  region, the set of potential colonizers. The regional species are  determined by the range of ecological opportunity the region as well as by  the history of that region.   - Influential factors: ​ The factors that can drive a species to local  extinction are severe climatic events, rapid changes in the habitat,  an overdose of predation, parasitism or disease, competition, loss  of food or other resources, on which the organism depends,  random demographic loss.   - Wallace suggested that  climatic evenness would promote  species persistence (maximum biomass)  ​, but later studies do  not seem to support that view. In fact a modicum of local  disturbance is beneficial to biodiversity, because it allows the  habitat to support species at different stages of ecological  succession. Either total disruption or total stasis seem to lead to  reduced biodiversity.   - Saturation:  ​The question comes up of how saturated  communities may be. Are they at biodiversity equilibrium or not?  New species come in one at a time. Some are incorporated but  others dropped out. Once extinctions are balanced by new  arrivals, a quisi-equilibrium is established, and species richness  seems to settle down. Without tracking the community over time,  of course, there is really no good way of knowing whether it is now  saturated . We can do some computer modeling, but that is never  good as assessing actual reality over time.   - Species richness: ​ In general local species richness (# different  species present) is a subset regional richness. If local richness is  determined mostly by  autology ​instead the local richness should  generally increase with regional richness  If local richness is 
background image To start using this template, click “File” -- “Make a Copy”     02/15/2018  determined mostly by synecology then local richness is less  depend on regional richness.   -   - Community convergence: ​ one thing that is known is that communities  gradually move toward their “full stocking” levels which may different from  different regions but there are general patterns that we are likely to see.  We find, for example, more lizards in deserts than in wetlands. We  generally see more species of birds in habitats with greater variation in  the heights of the vegetations. Though that turns out to be the reverse in  SA. We do not know what to make of that exception.   - Historical factors:  ​There are also historical factors that do not  necessarily leap out at one from the local biota. Consider the temperate  forests of Europe, NA, Northeastern Asia. THese regions have forested  areas in the ratio 1:1.3:1 butt the tree diversity 1:2:6. Those ratios are  matched at higher taxonomic levels. (biota of europe is limited, North  america is twice that, and NE Asia is quite rich)   - The Pleistocene glaciation essentially wiped out the temperate forest in  Europe, and shoved that in the North America into the Mexican Gulf, but  in Asia it just moved southward. Asia benefited from the previously  tropical taxa, then diversifying tinto temperature forms, argumenting the  temperate remnants, further north.   - The history of Diversity: ​ Since the Cambrian life has increased in  diversity, in spite of that fact there had been mass extinctions.   -  
background image To start using this template, click “File” -- “Make a Copy”     02/15/2018  - More explanation  - The number of taxa, N, increases as a function of speciation rate (S) and  decreases as a function of extinction rate (E). Where R is the net rate of  increase. If R>0 we have increase R<0 we have a decrease.     - Organization & Extinction rates:  ​the data we have suggest that the  value of R was highest in the Cambrian and Ordovician, decreasing ever  since, thought it shows a lot of ups and downs, including five mass  extinction events. (end of Ordovician, late Devonian, Permian/Triassic  Boundary, end of the Triassic, Mesozoic/Cenozoic boundary) Biodiversity  has been steadily accumulating since the Cambrian.        - Correlation: ​ What is also interesting is that S and E are (+) correlated.  That whenever a extinction happens rapidly so does subsequent  speciation. Turnover is a couple phenomenon. There is strong suspicion  that the twin process of speciation and extinction are coupled.   - a) It seems that highly specialized species are apt to speciate,  following the opening up of the divergent ecological opportunity  but are also prone to extinction as environment change.   - B) Small population are more likely to undergo a genetic  revolution, the sort of founder effect that can lead to speciation,  but they are also more likely to become extinct from demography  sampling or ecological catastrophe.  

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
13 Pages 30 Views 24 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Department: OTHER
Course: PRINC OF EVOLUTION
Professor: P. SMOUSE
Term: Spring 2018
Tags: Biology and evolution
Name: Week 9 notes
Description: These notes cover Biodiversity and Mutational Variation
Uploaded: 02/26/2018
13 Pages 30 Views 24 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to ECO 108 - Class Notes - Week 9
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to ECO 108 - Class Notes - Week 9

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here