Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

UCONN - PSY 1100 - Study Guide - Midterm

Created by: Joela Shurdho Elite Notetaker

> > > > UCONN - PSY 1100 - Study Guide - Midterm

UCONN - PSY 1100 - Study Guide - Midterm

School: University of Connecticut
Department: Psychology
Course: Psychology
Professor: Rentler
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Psychology
Name: PSYC exam 1 study guide
Description: review of weeks 1-7
Uploaded: 02/27/2018
0 5 3 25 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 3 of a 8 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image PSYCHOLOGY EXAM 1 STUDY GUIDE     Weeks 1, 2, 3, and 4:  
-Noah Chomsky: Language and Mind 1968 
 
Psychology as the “science of mind and behavior ​”:   1879 : Wilhelm Wundt in Leipzig, Germany, founded the 1st lab dedicated to psychology &  separated psychology from philosophy for the first time  - 1913 : John Broadus Watson says to be a science, psychology must only study the “observable”  & be a science of behavior, rather than of mind; “this inaugurates roughly six decades of dominance of 
American psychology by Behaviorism.” 
- 1967 : Ulric Neisser publishes textbook: Cognitive Psychology, outlining the areas of study (e.g.,  attention, memory, perception, language) that led to investigation in the decade before & provided a 
consensus view of the new field that “solidified its popularity and led to its rapid ascendance” 
-​ Titchener, Edwar (1880s/1890s): sets up his lab -> structuralism    Kulpe: contemporary of other psychologists -> “you can have thoughts without images associated” 
Imageless Thoughts  
-
Cognition : process by which sensory input is transformed, reduced, elaborated, stored, recovered, and  used   -cognitive psychology is most popular today (looking at human attention and perception &  “thought processes happen independent of body processes) 
 
 
Psychology as “the science of experimental epistemology”:      Foundations  Modern Philosophy  Modern 
Psychology 
  Rationalism:   Plato d.  347 BC    Descartes 
1641 
      Kant 
1781 
  Chomsky 
1959 
Empiricism:     Aristotle 
d. 322 
BC 
  Locke 
1690 
Berkeley 
1710 
Hume 
1748 
  Skinner 
1957 
   
 
What is the origin of knowledge?  Rationalism/Nativism: ​ born with innate ideas; experience provides occasion for knowing;  "nativism” 
background image Empiricism/Associationism ​: born as clean slate ("tabula rasa"); experience is source of  knowledge; "empiricism” 
 
How is knowledge arrived at?   Rationalism/Nativism: ​ learn by operation of mind – manipulation of concepts and ideas;  "rationalism”  Empiricism/Associationism ​: learn by connecting experiences in world;  "associationism”   -Skinner and Chomsky studied language  
 
 
Psychology as “The science of knowing and experiencing”   - Mind-Body problem :   -dualism: the universe is made of two interacting substances  - physical matter (body) 
-nonphysical immaterial matter (soul, mind, thoughts) 
- materialism : the “universe is made of one kind of substance, physical matter – which then must include  mind, if mind is real; merely an assertion though”  -knowing ​: more than just storing information like a computer  -animals know how to behave so as to meet goals 
-INTENTIONALLY 
-experiencing ​: more than just registering light wavelengths like a computer  -see blue, hear note played on clarinet, taste salt 
-different from knowledge or information: describe blue to a blind person, describe taste 
of salt without the word “salty”  -source of all motivation  - pineal gland: ​where the soul meets the body/mind   -your soul is connected to your body, your soul is not connected to the pen   Scientific Materialism ​: as a worldview says all that exists is matter in motion.  -defined by choice of variables to describe the nature in 17 th  century  -includes physical variables like mass, length, velocity, and momentum 
-excludes all psychological variables and phenomena that don’t fit with the physical, like 
color, sound, taste, and generally knowing and experiencing 
Physical description of nature
​ is taken to be reality, rather than a strategy  Ex) animals (humans too) must interpret that reality and assign meaning (“knowing”) and  quality (“experiencing”) 
-
Materialist position​: the mind= product of neural activity is an assertion made plausible by  lack of alternatives, and the computer metaphor is used to try to make sense of how neural 
activity could give rise to knowing and experiencing. 
Scientific materialism -> Neural assumption -> Computer metaphor 
background image - Alfred North Whitehead:​ ​Science And The Modern World  ​(1925) ->explains that  scientific materialism isn’t about finding a science, it’s about defining a feature of it  
-
Thomas Nagel: Mind and Cosmos  ​->questions assumptions about the nature of the  universe  
-
Alva Noe:​ ​Out Of Our Heads ​ -> mind is the product of the brain    
 
Psychology as “the science of things that move around on their own”:  - Ancient Greek philosophy c. 600 BCE:   matter:  Thales’s concept of matter, later Democritus and atoms c. 400 BCE  motion:  naturalistic (non-supernatural) account of motion and change culminating in  Aristotle’s physics c. 350 BCE  -Scientific Revolution 1600s and after ​: ​  all nature viewed as matter in motion  matter: ​ ​ Dalton’s atomic theory 1803, Einstein’s confirmation of atoms 1905  motion:   ​Newton’s mechanics uses differential equations for change over time, Einstein’s  relativity 1915 combines space and time into one fabric  -things that move on their own are things that “behave” -psych  
 
- Things that move around on their own eventually produce all of psychology: 
-have goals or “motivation” (movement is not random) 
-detect / recognize / know when goals are met or not met (knowledge) 
-know their environment so as to move through it (perception) 
-change behavior based on experience (learning) 
-useful to preserve a record of their encounters with the world or to be changed by it 
(memory) 
-James Gibson (1904-1979):
​ locomotion -> perception/knowledge of the environment &  control/coordination of action for meeting goals and affecting the environment  
 
 
  Weeks 5, 6, and 7:  
 
Neurotransmitters:  
-
synapse: ​a gap between 2 neurons (the presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons)   -terminal endings of presynaptic neuron relay impulse to dendrites of postsynaptic neuron  -terminal buttons:  ​contain little sacs (“vesicles”) of chemicals (neurotransmitters)   - at action potential, vesicles burst and release neurotransmitters into the synapse   -receptor molecules:  ​on the membrane of dendrites are like little locks to be opened ->  neurotransmitters are the keys, and this is what opens ion gates to allow Na+ inside the first place  

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Connecticut who use StudySoup to get ahead
8 Pages 36 Views 28 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Connecticut who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: University of Connecticut
Department: Psychology
Course: Psychology
Professor: Rentler
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Psychology
Name: PSYC exam 1 study guide
Description: review of weeks 1-7
Uploaded: 02/27/2018
8 Pages 36 Views 28 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UCONN - PSYC 1100 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UCONN - PSYC 1100 - Study Guide - Midterm

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here