×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UB - ANA 113 - Class Notes - Week 4
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UB - ANA 113 - Class Notes - Week 4

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UB / Biology / ANA 113 / What holds the head of the humerus in the glenoid fossa?

What holds the head of the humerus in the glenoid fossa?

What holds the head of the humerus in the glenoid fossa?

Description

School: University at Buffalo
Department: Biology
Course: Human Anatomy
Professor: Judith tamburlin
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: ANA113 and anatomy
Cost: 25
Name: ANA 113 Week 4 notes
Description: Lectures 9, 11 and 12 covered in week 4
Uploaded: 03/01/2018
18 Pages 20 Views 3 Unlocks
Reviews

Lovely Sadia (Rating: )

Material contains copyright content:



LECTURE 9: ARTICULATIONS 


What holds the head of the humerus in the glenoid fossa?



The various articulations or joints of the body are classified according to their structure and  degree of movement.

I. Synarthroses 

A. Bones are held tightly by fibrous connective tissue (collagen) 

B. These joints are very stable 

C. No movement occurs Ex: sutures of skull 

II. Amphiarthroses 

A. Bones are bound together by fibrocartilage pads or discs 

B. Bound by CT→ ligaments 

C. Only limited motions occur at these joints Ex: intervertebral discs, symphysis  pubis, sacroiliac joints

III. Diarthroses (synovial joint) 


What is the mechanism of injury for an acromioclavicular sprain?



A. Enclosed in a fibroelastic joint capsule 

B. A membrane lines the capsule and joint activity. It produces synovial fluid which  lubricates the joint and reduces friction

C. Articulating ends of bones are covered with hyaline cartilage 

D. Ligaments and tendons support these joints 

Bursae­ small sacs filled with synovial fluid located near diarthrotic joints and the muscles and  tendons associated with them. Bursae reduce friction and are present where structures come in  contact with one another.

EXAMPLES OF DIARTHROTIC JOINTS 

Diarthrotic (synovial) joints are named according to their shape. The shape dictates the  movement that is permitted at that joint. (non axial­ little movement, uni­axial­­ movement  around one axis, biaxial­­ movement around two axes, tri axial­ around 3 axes, multi­axial­­  movement around many axes.

TYPE

MOVEMENT

EXAMPLES

Gliding

­ Uniaxial­ slides back and  forth

­ Intercarpal 

­ Intertarsal 

­ Vertebrocostal 

­ Temporomandibular joint 

(TMJ)

Pivot

­ Produces uniaxial rotation 

­ Atlas and axis= atlanto­axial 


What are the intrinsic muscles of the tongue?



If you want to learn more check out What is the relationship between the quantity demanded of a good and its price when all other influences or buying plans remain the same?
We also discuss several other topics like What are the disadvantages of a proscenium arch stage?

around a central axis

joint 

­ Proximal radioulnar joint 

­ (supination/pronation of 

forearm)

Hinge

­ Uniaxial 

­ flexion/extension

­ knee(tibia­femoral) 

­ elbow(humeroulnar?) 

­ Interphalangeal 

­ ankle(tibia and talus) 

­ TMJ

Condyloid/ 

Ellipsoidal

­ Biaxial movement 

­ flexion/extension 

­ abduction/adduction

­ Metacarpal and phalangeal 

joints(knuckles)

­ Radiocarpal joint of wrist 

­ Atlanto­occipital joint (atlas and occipital condyles)

Saddle

­ Produces a wide range of  movement

­ Carpometacarpal joint of thumb ­ sternoclavicular

Ball­and­Socket

­ Multiaxial movement 

­ Greatest range of 

movement 

(flexion/extension, 

abduction/adduction, 

medial/lateral rotation, 

circumduction)

­ shoulder/hip (gleno­humoral)

We also discuss several other topics like What is the meaning of circumstances?

LIGAMENTS 

A. General information 

1. Composed of dense regular connective tissue 

2. Connect bone to bone 

3. Provide stability for joints 

4. Reduce flexibility of joint and restricts its movement 

5. Due to poor vascularization healing after damage is generally slow and results are often  poor.

B. Examples of injuries to specific joints of the body and their associated ligaments: 1. Temporal Mandibular joint 

a. Combination hinge and gliding joint 

b. Joint is supported by 3 ligaments and has an articular disc which separates the  joint cavity into a superior and inferior portion.

c. TMJ syndrome is due to a malalignment of one or both of the ™ joints 2. Vertebral column

a. A number of different joints and ligaments are located here but of particular  importance are the anterior and posterior longitudinal ligaments.

b. As a result of injury (compression, etc.) the posterior (weaker and thinner of the  two) is often stretched or damaged. The fibrocartilaginous intervertebral disc may  therefore protrude posterior laterally. (slipped disc) If you want to learn more check out What are the four categories of animal tissue?

3. Shoulder Don't forget about the age old question of What are the two different kinds of learning?

Dislocation­ Displacement of the head of the humerus from the glenoid fossa. 1. Several ligaments help to hold the head of the humerus in the glenoid fossa of the  scapula.

2. The strongest ligaments are located in the posterior region, damage usually occurs anteriorly causing the shoulder to droop anterior/inferior.

3. Major nerves in this area may be damaged or compressed. 

Separation­refer to a sprain of the ligaments at the acromio­clavicular joint Most severe results in dislocation of acromio­clavicular joint as ligament ruptures 4. Ankle 

a. Several ligaments support the ankle ­ medially lies the strongest ligament, the  deltoid ligament, which joins the tibia to the talus.

b. Injury ­ during over inversion of the foot often there is damage to the weaker,  lateral ligaments that connect the fibula to the talus and to the calcaneus. This  injury occurs at the Subtalar (talocalcaneal) joint.

5. Knee 

a. Major support for this joint comes from the anterior and posterior cruciate  ligaments and the medial (tibial) and lateral (fibular) collateral ligaments. b. Two fibrocartilaginous discs called the lateral and medial menisci lie between the  femur and tibia. Don't forget about the age old question of What is the meaning of the commerce clause?

“Unhappy Triad” (clipping injury) 

1. Anterior cruciate is torn 

2. Medial collateral ligament is torn 

3. Medial meniscus is damaged 

Associated Clinical Considerations 

Strain­ excessive stretching or tearing of tendons or muscles 

Sprain­ stretching or tearing of ligaments 

Dislocation­ displacement of the articular surfaces of bones at a joint 

Bursitis­ inflammation of the bursa surrounding a joint 

Arthritis­ general term for joint diseases involving swelling (edema); inflammation and pain PRICE: Protect, Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation

LECTURE 11 & 12: MAJOR AXIAL AND APPENDICULAR MUSCLES OF THE  BODY

INTRODUCTION TO THE MAJOR MUSCLES OF THE BODY 

When studying the various muscles of the body note that a number of descriptive words have  been used to name muscles. This terminology greatly simplified the task of learning muscle  names. In addition, realize that although there are more than 600 skeletal muscles in the body  many of these are paired, that is to say, the muscles can be found on both the right and left side  of the body.

The following examples will introduce you to the manner in which muscle names have been  logically derived from various descriptive terms.

1. Location ­ intercostals (inter = between, cost = ribs) 

2. Shape ­ gluteus maximus (maximus = largest) 

3. Size ­ trapezius (trapezoid shape) 

4. Fiber Orientation ­ rectus abdominis (rectus = straight) 

5. Attachment ­ sternocleidomastoid (attached to sternum, clavicle, & mastoid process) 6. # of heads ­ biceps (bi = 2, ceph = head) 

7. Relative position ­ external oblique (external = outermost, oblique = fiber direction) 8. Function ­ adductor pollicus (adducts, pollicus = thumb) 

Rather than merely memorizing the names of muscles make an attempt to determine how their  name was derived. This will save you time as well as give you a better understanding of each  muscle’s location, action, etc.

NOTE: Generally, the more proximal attachment of a muscle, called its origin, is fixed. The  more distal attachment, referred to as its insertion, is usually the movable end. Tendons extend from a muscle and attach it to bone. Often they span a joint, hence as the muscle contracts (shortens) one of the bones moves relative to the other at or around that joint.

The easiest way to understand the action of a muscle 

Let us consider the concentric contraction, a shortening contraction of a muscle. As always orient yourself as to what view of the muscle you are observing (ex: anterior, posterior, lateral or  medial view). First notice the direction of the muscle fibers. Notice if and where the muscle  crosses a joint. Then think of the muscle fibers shortening. When the muscle contracts it will  cause movement over the joint it crosses. The movement it causes is called the “action” of the  muscle. NOW: your memorization of muscle action is decreased because you can picture and  understand the shortening of the muscle!

LECTURE 11: MAJOR MUSCLES OF THE AXIAL SKELETON 

Be able to identify all muscles (name and general location), the joints they move, and their  primary action which is the function of the muscle.

MUSCLES OF THE SCALP AND FACE: These thin muscles insert on the skin and provide  for a number of complex facial expressions.

MUSCLE

LOCATION

ACTION

INNERVATIO N

Frontal portion of  Occipitofrontalis

Forehead

­Wrinkles 

­forehead/move eyebrows

Facial

Orbicularis Oculi

Surrounds orbit

Closing eyes, blinking

Facial

Orbicularis Oris

Surrounds mouth

closing/opening mouth,  closes & purses lips

Facial 

Zygomaticus 

Major

Origin­zygomatic bone Insertion­corner of mouth

Pulls sides of mouth 

(smiling)

Facial

Depressor Anguli  Oris

Origin­mandible 

Insertion­corner of mouth

Pulls corners of lips 

(frown)

Facial

Levator Labii 

Superioris

Insertion­upper lip of  mouth

Moves upper lip (Elvis  muscle)

Facial

Depressor Labii  Inferioris

Insertion­lower lip of  mouth

Moves lower lip down

Facial

Buccinator

Cheek

Compress cheek, aids  mastication by holding  food in place

Facial

Platysma

Neck under the chin

Tenses skin of neck

Facial

MUSCLES OF MASTICATION: The following muscles are responsible for biting and  grinding movements of the jaw. They originate in the skull and insert on the mandible.

MUSCLE

LOCATION

ACTION

INNERVATION

Temporalis

Origin­ lateral skull 

Insertion­ mandible

­prime masticatory jaw ­elevates mandible

Trigeminal

Masseter

Insertion­lateral angle  of mandible

­prime masicater 

­elevates mandible

Trigeminal

Medial Pterygoid

Insertion­ medial 

mandible near its angle

­elevate the jaw 

­elevates mandible

Trigeminal

Lateral Pterygoid

Insertion­superior 

aspect of medial 

mandible

­depresses jaw(protract) ­depresses mandible

Trigeminal

OCULAR MUSCLES: will be discussed during the eye lecture 

4 rectus muscles (rectus = straight) ­ these muscles move the eyeball in the direction indicated  by their name.

­ Superior rectus

­ Inferior rectus

­ Medial rectus

­ Lateral rectus

2 oblique muscles ­ these muscles rotate the eyeball

­ Superior oblique

­ Inferior oblique

EXTRINSIC MUSCLES OF THE TONGUE (tongue = glossus): Refers to muscles that insert  on the tongue but do not originate on the tongue. These muscles allow for its gross movement.

MUSCLE

LOCATION

ACTION

INNERVATION

Hyoglossus 

Origin­ hyoid bone 

Insertion­ tongue

Curl tongue laterally

Hypoglossal 

Genioglossus 

Origin­ mandible(chin) Insertion­ tongue

Protracts tongue

Hypoglossal 

Styloglossus 

Origin­styloid process Insertion­ tongue

Retract tongue

Hypoglossal 

MUSCLES OF THE ANTERIOR NECK:  The following GROUPS of muscles are attached to other structures in the neck.

MUSCLE GROUPS

LOCATION

ACTION

INNERVATION

Suprahyoid muscles

Superior to hyoid,  anterior neck

Support tongue, 

elevate tongue/hyoid

Trigeminal, facial

Infrahyoid muscles

Inferior to hyoid, 

anterior neck

Depress tongue/hyoid Swallowing 

hypoglossal

MUSCLES OF THE ANTEROLATERAL NECK: 

MUSCLE

LOCATION

ACTION

INNERVATION

Sternocleidomastoid  (SCM)

Anterolateral 

neck

­ flex neck(look down) is  bilateral

­ turn head is unilateral 

­ pathologic “Torticollis”

Accessory (CN XI)

Scalenus Medius

Deep to SCM

­ assisting movement of  neck

­ actions­ same as SCM

Cervical nerves

DEEP MUSCLES OF THE BACK: The following are examples of muscles located in the  back. Some extend as far superior as the back of the skull and thus serve to support the head  while other support the vertebral column.

MUSCLE

LOCATION

ACTION

INNERVATIO N

Erector Spinae group      Iliocostalis 

     Longissimus 

     Spinalis

Sacrum to skull 

Deep along vertebral column To superficial muscles

­ keeps spine erect ­ extends spine

Spinal nerves 

Spinal nerves 

Spinal nerves

Quadratus 

Lumborum

Iliac crest to posterior 

     Abdominal wall and           upper lumbar vertebrae

­ bilateral ­ extends  spine and maintains  upright posture

­ unilateral ­ 

laterally flex lumbar spine to same side

T 12 and Upper  Lumbar nerves

MUSCLES OF THE ABDOMINAL WALL: These muscles support and protect the organs of  the abdominal cavity. All of these muscles support and protect the abdominal viscera.

MUSCLE

LOCATION

ACTION

INNERVATION

External Oblique

Superficial abdomen

Bilaterally flexes and  rotates

Thoracic and Lumbar  nerves

Internal Oblique

Deep to External 

Oblique

Bilaterally flexes and  rotates

Thoracis and Lumbar  nerves

Transversus 

Abdominis

Innermost abdomen

Deepest

Thoracic and Lumbar  nerves

Rectus Abdominis

Superficial, medial  abdomen

Flexes spine (6­8 pack)

Thoracic and Lumbar  nerves

MUSCLES OF RESPIRATION (See Respiratory Lecture): 

MUSCLE

LOCATION

ACTION

INNERVATION

External Intercostals

Between ribs

Expiration

Intercostal nerves

Internal Intercostals

Between ribs

Inhalation

Intercostal nerves

Diaphragm

Between thoracic and  abdominal cavities

Aid in respiration 

(contraction)

Phrenic nerve

MUSCLES OF THE PELVIC FLOOR AND PERINEUM:

MUSCLE

LOCATION

ACTION

INNERVATION

Pelvic diaphragm: 

     Levator Ani

Outlet of pelvis

Support bladder, 

vagina, rectum and 

Pudendal nerves

     Coccygeus 

     Pubococcygeus

anus

Urogenital 

Diaphragm

Between 2 sides of  pubic arch

- ureter →  

genitals

­ prevent prolapse

Pudendal nerves

LECTURE 12: MAJOR MUSCLES OF THE APPENDICULAR SKELETON 

MUSCLES THAT ACT ON THE PECTORAL GIRDLE: The following muscles originate on the axial skeleton and insert on the  scapula. These strong, strap like muscles serve to attach the pectoral girdle to the rest of the the axial skeleton.

MUSCLE

JOINT 

CROSSED

LOCATION

ACTION

INNERVATION

Serratus Anterior

Anterolateral thorax to  scapula

Protracting scapula and holds scapula on

Long Thoracic

Trapezius 

    Upper Trapezius 

    

   Middle Trapezius 

     

   Lower Trapezius

Cervical spine 

Thoracic spine Thoracic spine

Origin­ posterior neck Insertion­ scapula 

Origin­ upper thoracic  vertebrae

Insertion­ scapula 

Origin­ lower thoracic  vertebrae

Insertion­ scapula

constriction(multiple ways) some  extension of neck works on clavicle  anteriorly(shrug) keep scapula in position → adductor 

→ depress

Accessory (CN XI) Accessory (CN XI) Accessory (CN XI)

MUSCLES THAT MOVE THE ARM (BRACHIUM): Muscles originate on the axial skeleton or scapula, and insert on the  humerus.

MUSCLE

JOINT CROSSED

LOCATION

ACTION

INNERVATION

Pectoralis Major

Clavicle, sternum and 

anterior thorax to anterior  proximal humerus

­ works on humerus 

­ clavicular head­flexes  shoulder

­ sternocostal head­ 

adducts and rotates

Medial and Lateral     Pectoral nerves

Latissimus Dorsi

Lower back to anterior  proximal humerus

­ extends shoulder 

­ adduction 

­ rotates arm

Thoracodorsal

Teres Major

Posterior inferior 

   Scapula to anterior          proximal humerus

­ adduct 

­ latissimus dorsi 

­ abduct

Lower Subscapular

Deltoid: Anterior 

Deltoid

        Middle Deltoid         Posterior Deltoid

Anterior glenohumeral 

Superior glenohumeral Posterior glenohumeral

Superficial shoulder 

Superficial shoulder 

Superficial shoulder

­ primary abduct 

­ abduct arm 

­ extension

Axillary 

Axillary 

Axillary

Rotator Cuff: 

     Supraspinatus 

     Infraspinatus 

     Teres Minor 

     Subscapularis

Superior glenohumeral 

Superior posterior 

glenohumeral

Posterior glenohumeral  inferior to infraspinatus Anterior glenohumeral

Superior posterior scapula 

Posterior scapula, inferior to  supraspinatus

Posterior scapula, inferior to  infraspinatus

Anterior scapula

­ all: rotation of arm 

­ major stabilizer of  shoulder, also abducts ­ internal rotation 

(medial)

Suprascapular 

Suprascapular 

Axillary 

Upper and Lower 

Subscapular

MUSCLES THAT ACT ON THE FOREARM: These muscles originate on the scapula or humerus and cross the elbow joint to  insert on the radius or ulna.

MUSCLE

JOINT CROSSED

LOCATION

ACTION

INNERVATION

Biceps Brachii

Anterior elbow

Superficial anterior 

humerus to proximal  radius

Flexion of arm at elbow,  supinator

Musculocutaneous

Brachialis

Anterior elbow

Humerus to proximal  ulna, deep to biceps

Flexion at forearm

Musculocutaneous 

Brachioradialis

Anterolateral elbow

Distal humerus to distal  radius; is superficial on  lateral forearm

Radial 

Triceps Brachii

Posterior elbow

Posterior humerus to  ulna, is superficial

Extends forearm at elbow

Radial

MUSCLES THAT SUPINATE OR PRONATE ON THE FOREARM:

MUSCLE

LOCATION

ACTION

INNERVATION

Supinator

Proximal forearm, deep

Assist supination

Radial

Pronators: 

     Pronator Teres 

     Pronator Quadratus

Proximal anteromedial forearm;  humerus to lateral radius, superficial Distal anterior forearm, deep

Median 

Median

MUSCLES THAT MOVE THE WRIST, HAND AND FINGERS: These muscles cross the joints of the wrist and/or metacarpals  and phalanges. Therefore, they originate on the humerus, radius or ulna and insert on the metacarpals or phalanges. The flexors  located in the anterior compartment of the forearm, extensors are located in the posterior compartment of the forearm. Note: the posterior interosseous nerve is a branch of the radial nerve.

MUSCLE

JOINT(S) CROSSED

LOCATION

ACTION

INNERVATION

Flexor Carpi Radialis

Anterior and lateral wrist

Anterior forearm

Flex wrist radial, 

deviates wrists

Median

Flexor Carpi Ulnaris

Anterior and medial wrist

Anterior forearm

Flex wrist, ulnar deviates

Ulnar

Flexor Digitorum 

     Superficialis 

Flexor Digitorum 

     Profundus

Anterior wrist, MC’s, proximal  interphalangeal jts, superficial

Anterior wrist, MC’s, proximal and  distal interphalangeal jts, deep

Anterior forearm Anterior forearm

Flex fingers

Median 

Median and Ulnar

Flexor Pollicis Longus

Anterior thumb (interphalangeal jt)

Anterior forearm

Flexor of thumb

Median

Extensor Carpi Radialis     Longus

Posterior and lateral wrist

Posterolateral 

forearm

Extend wrist and radially deviates wrist

Radial

Extensor Carpi Ulnaris

Posterior and medial wrist

Posterior forearm

Extend wrist, deviates  wrists in an ulnar

Posterior 

Interosseous

Extensor Digitorum

Posterior fingers and wrist

Posterior forearm

Extend fingers and wrist

Posterior 

Interosseous

Extensor Pollicis 

Longus

Posterior thumb (interphalangeal jt)

Posterior forearm

Extend thumb

Posterior 

Interosseous

INTRINSIC MUSCLES OF THE HAND: Both the origin and the insertion of these muscles are located in the hand itself. They  allow for more precise or fine movements of the hand.

MUSCLE

LOCATION

ACTION

INNERVATION

Thenar muscles 

     Abductor Pollicis Brevis      Flexor Pollicis Brevis 

     Adductor Pollicis 

     Opponens Pollicis

Thenar eminence 

Thenar eminence 

Thenar eminence 

Thenar eminence

Abducts thumb 

Flexes thumb 

Adducts thumb 

Opposes thumb

Median 

Median 

Ulnar 

Median

Hypothenar muscles 

     Flexor Digiti Minimi Brevis      Abductor Digiti Minimi      Opponens Digiti Minimi

Hypothenar eminence 

Hypothenar eminence 

Hypothenar eminence

Flexes 5th digit 

Abducts 5th digit 

Opposed 5th digit

Ulnar 

Ulnar 

Ulnar

Lumbricals (4)

Hand, deep

Flex MCR, extend up

Median and Ulnar

Dorsal Interossei (4)

Hand, deep

Abducts fingers

Ulnar

Palmar Interossei (3)

Hand, deep

Adducts fingers

Ulnar 

MUSCLES THAT MOVE THE THIGH: These muscles originate from the pelvic girdle or vertebral column and insert on femur.

MUSCLE

JOINT CROSSED

LOCATION

ACTION

INNERVATION

Iliopsoas Group 

     Iliacus 

     Psoas Major

Anterior hip 

Anterior hip

Both muscles go to 

anterior proximal femur

Flexes femur

Femoral 

Upper Lumbar

Tensor Fascia Lata

Anterolateral hip

Anterolateral pelvis and  femur

abductor , flex and 

abduct femur

Superior Gluteal

Gluteus Maximus

Posterior hip

Buttocks

Extend thigh and hip  (femur)

Inferior Gluteal

Gluteus Medius

Lateral hip

Lateral Pelvis

Abducts and medially  rotates femur

Superior Gluteal

Adductor Magnus

Medial hip

Medial femur

Abducts femur

Obturator

MUSCLES OF THE THIGH THAT MOVE THE LEG: These muscles originate from the pelvic girdle or femur, cross the knee  joint, and insert on the lower leg.

MUSCLE

JOINT CROSSED

LOCATION

ACTION

INNERVATION

Sartorius

Anterolateral hip, 

medial knee

Anterior femur, 

superficial

Flexes thigh at hip and  leg at knee, flexes femur and lower leg

Femoral

Quadriceps Femoris:      Rectus Femoris 

     Vastus Lateralis 

     Vastus Intermedius      Vastus Medialis

Anterior knee and hip 

Anterior knee 

Anterior knee 

Anterior knee

Anterior femur 

Anterior femur 

Anterior femur 

Anterior femur

Extensor of lower leg at  knee, can flex at hip,  flexes femur

Femoral 

Femoral 

Femoral 

Femoral

Hamstrings: 

     Biceps Femoris 

     Semitendinosus 

     Semimembranosus

Posterior hip and knee Posterior hip and knee Posterior hip and knee

Posterior femur 

Posterior femur 

Posterior femur

Flexes lower leg, 

extends femur

Sciatic 

Sciatic 

Sciatic

MUSCLES OF THE LEG THAT MOVE THE ANKLE, FOOT AND TOES: The following muscles originate on the femur, tibia, or fibula and insert on the bones of the ankle and/or foot.

MUSCLE

JOINT CROSSED

LOCATION

ACTION

INNERVATION

Tibialis Anterior

Anterior and medial ankle

Anterior leg

Dorsiflexion and invert

Deep Fibular/Peroneal

Extensor Hallucis 

     Longus

Dorsal surface, joints of  the great toe and ankle

Anterior leg

Large toe dorsiflex

Deep Fibular/Peroneal

Extensor Digitorum 

     Longus

Dorsal surface, joints of  the digits and ankle

Anterior leg

Extends toes 

dorsiflexes

Deep Fibular/Peroneal

Fibularis/Peroneus 

     Longus

Lateral ankle

Lateral leg

Plantarflexion 

Superficial 

     Fibular/Peroneal

Fibularis/Peroneus 

     Brevis

Lateral ankle

Lateral leg

Plantarflexion 

Superficial 

     Fibular/Peroneal

Gastrocsoleus Group:      Gastrocnemius 

     Soleus

Posterior ankle and knee Posterior ankle

Posterior leg 

Posterior leg

plantarflex

Tibial  

Tibial 

Tibialis Posterior

Posterior and medial ankle

Posterior leg

plantar flexion and 

inversion

Tibial

Flexor Hallucis Longus

Plantar surface, joints of 

Posterior leg

Large toe plantar flexion

Tibial 

the great toe and ankle

INTRINSIC MUSCLES OF THE FOOT: Both origin and insertion of these muscles are in the foot.

MUSCLE

LOCATION

ACTION

INNERVATION

Flexor Digiti Minimi Brevis

Plantar aspect of foot

Flex 5th digit

Lateral Plantar

Flexor Digitorum Brevis

Plantar aspect of foot

Medial Plantar

Flexor Hallucis Brevis

Plantar aspect of foot

Medial Plantar

Lumbricals (4)

Foot, deep

Flex large toe

Medial and Lateral Plantar

Dorsal Interossei (4)

Foot, deep

Stability

Lateral Plantar

Plantar Interossei (3)

Foot, deep

Lateral Plantar

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here