Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

UTD - AHST 1303 - Exam II Study Guide - Study Guide

Created by: Isra Abdulwadood Elite Notetaker

> > > > UTD - AHST 1303 - Exam II Study Guide - Study Guide

UTD - AHST 1303 - Exam II Study Guide - Study Guide

School: University of Texas at Dallas
Department: OTHER
Course: Survey of Western Art History: Ancient to Medieval
Professor: Dianne Goode
Term: Spring 2018
Tags: AHST, Greek, Classical, hellensitic, and Roman
Name: Exam II Study Guide
Description: These art works will be on the second exam.
Uploaded: 03/02/2018
0 5 3 49 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 6 of a 33 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image AHST Exam II Review  Archaic (600 - 480 BCE) - Greek Art  Geometric and Orientalizing: c. 900 - 600 BCE  
Archaic: c. 600 - 480 BCE 
Classical: c. 480 - 323 BCE 
Hellenistic: c. 323 - 30 BCE  
 
Kouros c. 600 BCE from Attica  
Kouros c. 600 BCE from Sounion  
•  Life-size (over 6 ft high)  •  Attica: near Athens   •  Purpose: grave markers and temple standing   Stone sculpture replace the vase as a grave marker   •  S: temple of Poseidon (god of the Sea)   •  Medium: marble (local supply)  Painted   •  Advanced leg: show movement  •  Egyptian influence: stiff, unrealistic, blocky, stylized, patterned hair   Unrealistic torso (pointed and inverted arches) and triangular 
face  
•  Arching Point of Greek Artistic Development: movement form 
stylization to realism v quickly  
  
Kouros, c. 530 BCE, from Anavysos 
•  6' 4"  •  Grave marker inscription   Kroisos (name of deceased); warrior died in battle; mention of 
Aries (god of War)  
•  Painted at one point (lips, face, eyes - more realistic)   •  Similarity: stylized, one foot forward, male, nude, etc.  
background image •  Differences: (progression of 70 years) block of stone removed, 
more realistic body (no more linear approach of torso), rounded 
hips, rounded body (attempt at muscles), etc.  
Visual discernment   •  Tools: iron tools (use more pressure, stronger,   •  Nudity: 776 BCE Olympics games done all year long in the nude  Women were not performing in the nude, cloistered space in 
the homes so no nude imagery of them 
Men pride themselves in physical prowess - extreme shift and 
development of realistic male nude body  
•  Archaic Smile: signifies life   Disappear in 480 BCE - Persian sacking (destruction of buildings 
and statues, serious, tough, sobering time for Greeks)  
  
Peplos Kore, c. 530 BCE, from the Acropolis, Athens  
•  Peplos: long woolen garment  •  See traces of painted  •  Acropolis: high hill in Athens where the Persians will sack, center of 
town, sanctuary to Athena  
Found buried on Acropolis   •  Not nude - very cloistered lifestyle of women, fully clothed figure of 
woman  
•  Might have represented a goddess - would have been able to 
distinguish if we knew what she held in her hand  
•  Archaic smile   •  Stylized, rigidity, etc.   •  Patterning hair - symmetrical, three locks on each side   •  Raised left arm: Piecing - different piece of marble, attached by a 
metal dowel  
  
Greek Columns: Evolution from old post-lintel construction   •  Doric: first, by Dorian   Shaft (vertical part) 
background image Capital on top    •  Abacus and Echinus  Entablature: on Top of Capital  •  Architrave, Frieze (triglyph and metopes), cornice 
(projecting), pediment (triangle on roof)  
No base   •  Ionic: second, island area (Cyclades)  Voluted Capital   Base   No T and M  •  Corinthian: third, found primarily at Corinth  Leaves (acanthys) on capital   Blank frieze   Base   No T and M  •  Relief sculpture found in metopes, pediment, and frieze   •  Brightly painted temples     
  
Temples: evolution from simpler to more complex 
•  Temple in Antis: cella (main room) would hold statue of dedicated 
god/dess 
Open on for priest class, normal people would worship statues 
outside 
Two columns between extending columns of the wall   •  Prostyle: four column row on porch   •  Amphiprostyle: column row on front and back (two porches - 
symmetrical and balanced) 
•  Peripteral: columns surround whole building, antis configuration 
before you get to cella (two columns front and back) 
Peristyle: external colunnade going all the way around     •  Anta: extending wall 
background image •  Pronaos:  a vestibule at the front of a classical temple, enclosed by a  portico and projecting sidewalls.   •  Stylobate: top step on which the columns rest      Greek Architecture vocabulary     
Temple to Hera I, c. 550 BCE, Paestum, Italy 
•  Many temples to Hera, wife of Zeus, goddess of marriage, wives, 
etc. 
•  Italian location because Greeks controlled a lot of Italian area   •  Doric: fat, supporting columns, holding up entablature with abacus 
and echinus  
Don't see pediment - in ruins   Evolution from old post-lintel construction   •  Medium: local limestone (not in Greece, can't use Greek marble)   •  Peripteral: 9 x 18 columns (1:2 ratio)  Be able to count columns - balance and proportion   •  3 columns in antis and a row along the center  •  Mirroring rooms flanking the cella     
Temple of Artemis, reconstruction of west façade and detail of west 
pediment, c. 600 - 580 BCE, Corfu  
•  Wealthy island due to trade between the west and east   •  Artemis: twin sister of Apollo (god of reason, light); goddess of the 
Hunt  
Medusa: monster, woman's body, snake hair, sight can turn 
enemies to stone, protector of temple  
•  Defeated by Perseus   •  Doric: no base on columns, abacus and echinus, bare architrave, 
frieze (repetition of T and M), sculptures in pediment  
•  Pediment: sculpture of Medusa (9 ft tall) flanked by Sons (Pegasus 
and Chrysaor) and panther-like creatures (heraldic arrangement)  
background image •  Sloped shape of Pediment poses an issue with spacing: largest 
figure in center at point, all other figures are smaller or crouching 
Figures not all in same scale   No unified narrative: Medusa and sons, Trojan war king and 
soldiers, battle between gods and giants  
•  Gigantomachy - battle of god's and giants; god's always win 
- metaphor for victory of order and reason over chaos) 
 
Siphnian Treasury, c. 530 BCE, Sanctuary of Apollo, Delphi 
•  God of reason and light   •  Siphnian Treasury - building to hold votive offers   S: people from the island of Siphnos in Cyclades (gold and silver 
mines)  
•  Painted white marble - really bright colors   •  Sculpted and painted frieze and pediment (both sides and all 
around) 
•  Caryatids: female figures acting like columns   •  North Frieze: gigantomachy (Apollo and Artemis fighting) - signifies 
triumph of reason and order over chaos  
Painted labels to show who is who   •  Overlapping: earliest way to show space (who's in front and who's 
behind) 
Lion over figure, Apollo over Artemis, arms over body, shields 
over shields, shields over bodies, etc.  
Varying levels of relief carving: lower/shallow relief carvings 
show farther away, higher relief show figures closer to viewer  
To indicate depth and space - very sophisticated   •  Pediment: crouching figures to accommodate slope, but all figures 
on the same scale - more realistic  
Thematic unity: story of Zeus and other gods on both 
pediments  
Fast 50 year change    
background image Temple of Aphaia, west facade, reconstruction, c. 500 - 490 BCE, Aegina  •  Local goddess of Aegina island (mothering, nurturing goddess)  •  Doric Temple   6 x 12 columns (1:2 ratio)  Triglyphs, metopes, and pediment sculptures  •  Pediment: Greek's fighting Trojans in Trojan war   Unity of narrative   •  Scale: realistic scale for humans, gods are bigger (see Athena - 
goddess of wisdom and warfare) 
Crouching to accommodate slope  •  Medium: local limestone, stucco-ed to look like marble      
Temple of Aphaia and Archer from west pediment, c. 490 BCE, Aegina 
•  More stylized than East - made 10 years earlier   •  Attempt to show musculature, not realistic, archaic smile, stylized 
face  
  
Temple of Aphaia and Archer from east pediment, c. 480 BCE, Aegina 
•  Archaic smile, taught muscles, realistic body (more knowledge of 
anatomy and how to depict it)  
•  See crouching to accommodate sloping - life size    •  See Dying Warriors - consumed with own death, more realistic 
body  
  
Kleitias and Ergotimos, Francois Vase (Volute Krater), and detail c. 570 
BCE, found at Chiusi, Italy  
•  Painting - vase painting (not many canvas paintings that came 
down to us) 
•  Used to mix water and wine   •  Etruscans (pre-Romans) lived in Chiusi, Italy and prized Greek vases 
(found a lot in tombs, etc) 
•  2 ft 2 in high   •  Know each figure due to inscriptions  

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Texas at Dallas who use StudySoup to get ahead
33 Pages 175 Views 140 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Texas at Dallas who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: University of Texas at Dallas
Department: OTHER
Course: Survey of Western Art History: Ancient to Medieval
Professor: Dianne Goode
Term: Spring 2018
Tags: AHST, Greek, Classical, hellensitic, and Roman
Name: Exam II Study Guide
Description: These art works will be on the second exam.
Uploaded: 03/02/2018
33 Pages 175 Views 140 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UTD - AHST 1303 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UTD - AHST 1303 - Study Guide - Midterm

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here