×
Log in to StudySoup

Forgot password? Reset password here

ECON 102 - Class Notes - Week 6

Created by: Tessa Elite Notetaker

> > > > ECON 102 - Class Notes - Week 6

ECON 102 - Class Notes - Week 6

School: College of William and Mary
Department: Math
Course: Principles: Macroeconomics
Professor: Mark Greer
Term: Spring 2018
Tags: Macroeconomics, loanable funds markets, investment, consumption, Saving, and Income
Name: Econ 102, Week 6 Notes
Description: These notes cover the market for loanable funds and the representation of such on the graph. They also discuss the investment demand schedule and begin talking about consumption, saving, and income.
Uploaded: 03/02/2018
This preview shows pages 1 - 3 of a 7 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Principles: Macroeconomics (ECON 102) Market for Loanable Funds Loanable funds­ Money that is not being spent by its holders, so it is available for lending
to borrowers
Suppliers of loanable funds: o Households o The government, if running a budget surplus o Foreign entities, if the country is running a trade deficit (NCI > 0) Demanders of loanable funds: o Firms o The government, if running a budget deficit o Foreign entities, if the country is running a trade surplus (NCO > 0) For simplicity, we will currently ignore: o The fact that loan instruments of different maturities and default risks have  differing interest rates (we will assume they all yield the same interest rate) o The role of the central bank (Federal reserve, in influencing interest rates) o Loanable funds coming in from abroad if running a trade deficit, and loanable  funds being used to fund foreign economies if running a trade surplus Demand for Loanable Funds Quantity of loanable funds demanded­ how much money borrowers are willing to borrow
at a given interest rate
o Why is the quantity of loanable funds demanded negatively related to nominal  interest rate, ceteris paribus? If the nominal interest rate decreases, then present values of future cash 
inflows from investment projects under consideration by firms increase; 
therefore, an increasing number of investment projects have positive NPV 
and are therefore worth undertaking
So, firms’ borrowings rise as they undertake more investment projects Other influences being held equal under ceteris paribus: o Budget deficit: if the deficit rises, then there will be more demand for loanable  funds at any given interest rate o Inflationary expectations: if expected inflation increases, then expected real  interest rate on a loan goes down at any given nominal interest rate. There is more
demand for loanable funds because in real terms, credit is cheaper
background image o Business optimism: if businesses become more optimistic about future economic  conditions and profits, then NPVs on investment projects go up. Therefore, 
investment spending rises and so does the demand for credit
o The NCO: if trade surplus rises, then foreign entities borrow even more from the  domestic financial system than before Suppose businesses become more optimistic about the future o At any given interest rate, I p  rises, so quantity demanded for loanable funds at that interest rate rises (there is an increase in demand for loanable funds) Supply of Loanable Funds Quantity of loanable funds supplied­ how much money savers (households, the 
government if running a budget surplus, and foreign entities if they have a positive NCI) 
are willing to lend at a given interest rate
Why is there a positive relationship between nominal interest rate and quantity supplied 
of loanable funds, ceteris paribus?
o The higher is the nominal interest rate, the more attractive it is for households to  save rather than consume; therefore, quantity supplied will increase Influences held constant under ceteris paribus: o Inflationary expectations: if the expected inflation rate rises, then the expected  real interest rate received on a loan falls. So, at any given nominal interest rate, 
fewer quantities of loanable funds will be forthcoming 
o Households’ preferences regarding consumption vs. spending: if households  become fearful of the future economic conditions, then at whatever interest rate  QD LF 0 ʹ QD LF 1 QD LF 0 ʹ QD LF 0 i 1 i 0 D LFʹ Q LF i D L F
background image one considers, they will save more. So, quantity supplied of loanable funds would 
increase
o Government budget surplus (if it has one): if surplus goes up, then government  supplies more loanable funds, whatever the interest rate may be o NCI: if trade deficit grows, then foreign entities supply more funding to domestic  financial system, whatever the interest rate may be Suppose working­age households become fearful that social security benefits will be cut 
by the time they retire
o At any interest rate, households will save more, so QS LF  will rise at that interest  rate o An increase in the supply of loanable funds is indicated on a graph by a shifting  right of the supply curve Determination of interest rate More funds are being offered as loans at an interest rate of i than borrowers are willing to 
borrow (QS
LF 1 >QD LF 1 ).  o There is a surplus Lenders who cannot find a borrower cut interest rate on an offer to attract borrowers Interest eventually reaches an equilibrium rate  Here are some examples. It might help to draw the graphs as you go along: Ex. Suppose trade deficit increases, causing an increase in NCI o Lower interest rates and volume of borrowing and lending: o Quantity of loanable funds traded, or Q eLF , rises o Graphically shown as a rightward shift of the supply of loanable funds curve, or  S LF Ex. Suppose government budget swings from a deficit to a surplus o The government is no longer a borrower: D LF  decreases, shown as a leftward shift  of the demand of loanable funds curve o The government now supplies loanable funds: S LF  increases, so the supply of  loanable funds curve shifts right o The impact on Q eLF  is ambiguous Ex. Suppose inflationary expectations fall o Expected real interest rates on loans increases (so S LF  increases) because  households are more inclined to save S LF  shifts right o Firms are less inclined to borrow, so D LF  decreases D LF  shifts left o The effect on Q eLF  is ambiguous

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at College of William and Mary who use StudySoup to get ahead
7 Pages 33 Views 26 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at College of William and Mary who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: College of William and Mary
Department: Math
Course: Principles: Macroeconomics
Professor: Mark Greer
Term: Spring 2018
Tags: Macroeconomics, loanable funds markets, investment, consumption, Saving, and Income
Name: Econ 102, Week 6 Notes
Description: These notes cover the market for loanable funds and the representation of such on the graph. They also discuss the investment demand schedule and begin talking about consumption, saving, and income.
Uploaded: 03/02/2018
7 Pages 33 Views 26 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to WM - ECON 102 - Class Notes - Week 6
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here