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BYU-I - CHEM 101 - Class Notes - Week 7

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BYU-I - CHEM 101 - Class Notes - Week 7

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background image ELECTRONEGATIVITY 
Who wants electrons?
Which Electron is tugging harder on its electrons?
Bond Types- One of two elements in a covalent bond may even be strong enough
to steal the electron entirely, this is called a Dipole moment. 
0.0-0.4= Nonpolar, or Equal bond
0.4-1.8=Covalent, electrons shared unequally. Polar
1.8-3.3=Ionic, electron transfers. 
Polar Molecules- Contain polar bonds, has a separation of positive and negative 
charge called a dipole that is indicated with funny symbols. Has dipoles that do 
not cancel. 
Lone pairs are a symbol of polar molecules. LONE PAIR POLAR BEAR CHEMICAL EQUATIONS  Atomic Mass- Important. Can be used as a conversion factor, with AM/1 atom of 
X element
ex. What is the mass in amu of 12 carbon atoms? !2*12.011= 144.132
Formula mas of a compound is the mass of amu in a compound, it is the sum of 
the atomic masses of all atoms of each element in a compound. 
AVACADO’S number Avogadro’s number, 6.022*10^23, or a Mole.  Mole is a word that means a specific number, like dozen or ream or pair. Mole 
means 6.022*10^23 of anything. Moles can be used to convert to many other 
kinds of things, such as molecules and mass amounts. 
the number, ITS HUGGGGE
huge
background image Moles can be converted to Atoms Molecules and formula units using 
Avogadro’s number. 
Atomic mass can be converted to mass, can be converted to the number 
of atoms
Percent Composition and Empirical Formulas C 6 H 12 O 6 = Percent composition of C is (6*Mass of C+12*Mass of H+6*Mass  of O) = Molar Mass. 
Then take 6*Mass of C/Total Molar Mass
40%C 6%H  53%O
Molecular Formula= the full or actual number of the atoms on a molecule Empirical Formula- Simplest whole number ratio of the atoms, and is 
calculated by dividing the subscripts in the molecular formula. Sometimes
they are the same. 
Steps to calculate Empirical Formula from grams-  1. Convert to Moles, 
2. Divide by the smallest, 
3. Use whole number ratio as subscripts
4. Sometimes you will need an atom multiplier to round one up to a whole
number.  Chemical Reactions- - Physical changes are changing the state of matter, solid, liquid gas. 
- Chemical change are the rearrangements of bonds. Produces new 
substances, there is a change in composition. Old bonds are broken 
and new bonds are formed. Atoms are rearranged. 
Chemistry is the study of substances in terms of Composition, Structure, 
Properties, and Reactions 
- Composition- what is it made of?
- Structure- How is it put together?
- Properties- What characteristics does it have?
- Reactions- How does it behave with other substances? 
Fruit Basket analogy  Five apples+ Eight oranges=1 flippin fruit basket
5A+8Or=1 FFB

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Join more than 18,000+ college students at Brigham Young University - Idaho who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Brigham Young University - Idaho
Department: Chemistry
Course: Introduction to General Chemistry
Professor: Robert Willis
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: General Chemistry
Name: Week 8 notes
Description: Electronegativity, Molar Empirical and Molecular formulas, Chemical Reactions, RedOx reactions,
Uploaded: 03/02/2018
4 Pages 22 Views 17 Unlocks
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