×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to colorado - PSYC 3303581 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to colorado - PSYC 3303581 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

COLORADO / Engineering / PSYC 3303581 / What is the meaning of a depressed mood?

What is the meaning of a depressed mood?

What is the meaning of a depressed mood?

Description

School: University of Colorado at Boulder
Department: Engineering
Course: Abnormal Psychology
Professor: Jessica beal
Term: Fall 2017
Tags:
Cost: 50
Name: Exam 2 study guides
Description: These notes are an easy study guide for what's been learned in class so far :)
Uploaded: 03/08/2018
16 Pages 51 Views 4 Unlocks
Reviews


Depressive and Bipolar Disorders 


What is the meaning of a depressed mood?



Part I: Definitions and Causes 

March 6, 2018 

Depressive and Bipolar Disorders 

• Dramatic set of disorders that captures people's interest

• Present across the lifespan

• Present across cultures, economic strata

• Huge individual and societal costs

o Millions meet criteria

o Economic costs = billions of dollars each year

o Incredible human suffering

DSM­5 Major Depressive Episode 

A) 5 or more of the following in a 2 week period

o Depressed mood (emotional)

o Diminished pleasure in activities (anhedonia, emotional)

o Significant weight loss or weight gain (physical)


What is diminished pleasure in activities?



o Insomnia or hypersomnia nearly every day (physical)

o Psychomotor agitation or retardation nearly every day (behavioral) o Fatigue or loss of energy nearly every day (physical)

o Feel worthless or excessive / inappropriate guilt (cognitive) Don't forget about the age old question of What is torsion?

o Diminished ability to think or concentrate (cognitive)

o Recurrent thoughts of death, suicidal thoughts or attempts (multiple) B) Symptoms cause clinically significant impairment

C) Not due to substance use or medical condition

DSM­5: If you want to learn more check out What is the electric field due to an infinite line of charge called?

Manic Episode 

• A distinct period of abnormal mood (at least 1 week)

o elevated

o expansive

o irritable

• Other features


What is the meaning of a dysthymic episode?



o Inflated self­esteem / grandiosity

o Decreased need for sleep

o Pressured speech

o flight of ideas

o Distractibility

o Increased goal directed activity

o Excessive involvement in pleasurable activities with potential for negative 

consequences

• Significant impairment

Other Mood Episodes 

• Dysthymic Episode

o Similar symptoms to depression

o Less severe

o Longer duration:  at least 2 years

• Hypomanic Episode

o Persistent elevated mood

o Less severe but similar to mania

o Not severe enough to lead to hospitalization, generally less impairment • Mixed Episode We also discuss several other topics like What are the steps in the consumer buying process?

o Symptoms of mania and depression at the same time

DSM­5 Depressive and Bipolar Disorders  

• Major Depressive Disorder ("unipolar")

o At least one major depressive episode

o No current or previous manic or hypomanic episode

• Persistent Depressive Disorder

o Chronic low grade depressed mood (2+ years)

• Bipolar I

o At least one manic episode 

o Nearly all will eventually have a major depressive episode • Bipolar II

o Hypomania

o Current or past major depressive episode

• Cyclothymic Disorder

o Chronic, fluctuating mood disturbance

o Separate periods of hypomanic and depressive symptoms

o Up to half will eventually meet criteria for Bipolar I

Other Specifying Features of 

Depressive and Bipolar Disorders  

• Melancholic features

o Profound depressed mood, despair, little or no pleasure

o Major physical slowing, exhaustion

• Psychotic features

o Delusional thinking

o Hallucinations

• Peripartum onset / postpartum

o Occur first immediately after birth of childWe also discuss several other topics like What type of learning associates a stimulus with a response?

o often severe with psychotic features

o Very high risk if premorbid mood episode (up to 50X) o Risk increases in subsequent births after the first episode • Seasonal pattern

o Regular seasonal pattern to episodes

o Full remissions occur at a regular time of year

Prevalence 

• Major Depression

o Lifetime prevalence: 20% (at least)

o 1­ year prevalence: 8 ­ 10%

o Equal rates in males and females before puberty

o 2 or 3X more common among women after puberty

• Bipolar I and II

o Lifetime prevalence: 3 ­ 5%

o 1­year prevalence: 2 ­ 3%

o equal rates in men and women

• Cyclothymic Disorder

o Lifetime prevalence: 1%

o 1­year prevalence: < 1%

o Equal rates in men and women

Why is depression more common among women?

Why is depression more common among women?

Depressive and Bipolar Disorders and Impairment 

• Academic functioning

o Lower grades

o Higher rates of dropped classes, drop out of school

• Social functioning

o Friendships, romantic relationships

o parenting

• Occupational functioning

o among the top five causes of lost wages / productivity • "Life" functioning Don't forget about the age old question of Why do some geographers today believe malthus theory can be used to predict future population issues?

o Driving impairment

o Exercise less

o Poor money management

o Suicide: as high as 10 ­ 20%

Course of Depressive and Bipolar Disorders  

• Onset

o Wide range from childhood through 50s

o Average: early 20s (and getting younger)

• Developmental precursors

o Low level symptoms are present for years before the first episode

o Severe stress often precedes onset (not required for diagnosis)

• Clinical Course

o "spontaneous" recovery between episodes

o very rare to have a single episode

o each subsequent episode is typically more severe

• "Rapid­cycling" depressive or bipolar disorder

o 4+ episodes per year

o 90% female

20 years in the life of a hypothetical individual with multiple episodes of major depression Family Studies of Depression and Bipolar I: Some shared family risk and some risk factors unique to Bipolar IDon't forget about the age old question of Bond energy refers to what?

Depression and Bipolar disorder run in the same families (Black = Bipolar, split = depression, White = no diagnosis) Heritability of depression, bipolar, and anxiety disorders

Depressive and Bipolar Disorders 

Part II: Causes and Treatment 

March 8, 2018 

Brain Correlates of Major Depressive Disorder 

• Structural and functional MRI

o Executive control system underactive

o Amygdala hyperactivity

o Hippocampus size and activity reduced

• Neurotransmitters and stress hormones

o chronic stress response

• Elevated cortisol (stress hormone)

• Lowered immune response

o low serotonin

• Neuromodulator; low levels may decrease regulation of other 

neurotransmitters, permit wider range

o Low norepinephrine

o bottom line: complex dysfunction across multiple systems, but stress response  system is central

Brain Correlates of Bipolar Disorder I 

• Structural and functional MRI

o Increased activity in entire brain during mania

o Especially pronounced in amygdala

o Hypersensitive to reward

o Relative prefrontal cortex underactivation (dramatic during depressive phase) • Neurotransmitters and stress hormones

o Elevated cortisol (stress hormone)

o depleted serotonin

• Neuromodulator loses ability to regulate other neurotransmitter systems o Norepinephrine, dopamine elevated (esp. in manic state)

o GABA involved (link to anxiety/agitation)

MDD: Environmental Risk and Protective Factors 

• Diathesis­stress: interaction with genetic risk

• Loss events

o Specific to depression and not anxiety

o Divorce or other end of relationship = a key risk factor

• Chronic stress

o May play a role in comorbidity of MDD and anxiety

o Key contributor to relapse

• Social support

o Protective factor that is often lost when depression hits

• A complication: are these risk factors or consequences?

o Stressors are a clear risk factor for relapse

o Low social support is a risk factor for depression

o But depression also leads to a decline in social support

Bipolar Disorder: 

Environmental Risk and Protective Factors 

• Similar to MDD

o Diathesis­stress: interaction with genetic risk

o Loss events

o Chronic stress (and severe shorter­term stress)

o Social support

• "Expressed emotion" in the family (key for relapse)

o High levels of anger / distress

o intrusive

• Substance use

o may precipitate 

o important consequence

o Risk for relapse

Summary: 

Bipolar Disorder vs. Major Depression 

• Some key similarities

o Shared symptoms

o Episodic, worsening course

o Familial and genetic overlap

o Frontal cortex and serotonin involvement

o Stress is key predictor of onset and relapse

• But some very important differences

o Unique family and genetic influences on bipolar disorder 

o Dopamine and norepinephrine prominently involved in mania

o Very different medications are effective

• Current bottom line

o Shared risk factors lead to risk for depression

o Bipolar disorder is also associated with additional independent risk factors that may  influence the dopamine system

o Related but distinct disorders

Cognitive aspects of MDD 

• Negative thinking / bias

o Automatic negative and erroneous thoughts

o Cognitive triad ­ negative thoughts about:

• self (internal)

• experiences (global)

• the future (will always be this way; stable)

• Rumination

o Dwell on negative mood, but don't act to change it

• Learned helplessness

o Perceived loss of control of reinforcements in life

o Hopeless re: potential to change

• Risk factors or consequences?

o Tendency to ruminate predicts prior to depression

o Negative cognitions after depression begins

Genetic "Diathesis" is shared by anxiety disorders and depression Comorbidity of MDD and most anxiety disorders is almost entirely explained by shared genetic risk factors

The "stress" component of "diathesis­stress": 

Environmental risk factors distinguish 

depression and anxiety disorders 

• Anxiety: threat events

o Risk of loss of attachment figure

o Physical jeopardy

o Impending school transition

o Taking an exam

o Parental perfectionism

• Depression: loss events

o Loss of attachment figure

o Serious illness to relative

o Family discord: more for females?

o Divorce: more for males?

o Onset of parental depression

o After a move

Environmental factors and cognitions distinguish anxiety and depression 

Cognitive aspects of MDD 

• Negative thinking / bias

o Automatic negative and erroneous thoughts

o Cognitive triad ­ negative thoughts about:

• self (internal)

• experiences (global)

• the future (will always be this way; stable)

• Rumination

o Dwell on negative mood, but don't act to change it

• Learned helplessness

o Perceived loss of control of reinforcements in life

o Hopeless re: potential to change

• Risk factors or consequences?

o Tendency to ruminate predicts prior to depression

o Negative cognitions after depression begins

Psychosocial Treatments for Major Depression 

• Behavioral therapy (e.g., behavioral activation)

o Increase positive activities / positive reinforcement

• Cognitive Therapy

o Similar to anxiety ­ recognize and challenge negative cognitions

o Often incorporates some of the behavioral techniques as well

• Interpersonal Psychotherapy

o Based on model that interpersonal problems lead to depression

o Address interpersonal deficits, loss, etc.

• Couples / family therapy

o Address issues in the context of the couple dyad (Mark Whisman)

• Other factors

o Exercise

o Sleep hygiene

o Substance use

Pharmacological Treatments for Major Depression 

• Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors

o Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil

o Increase availability of serotonin throughout the brain

o Hard to overdose

o Side effects: weight , sexual dysfunction

o controversy about slightly increased risk of suicidal thoughts, aggressive behavior:  benefits outweigh the costs, but careful tracking is key

So what works? 

• Psychosocial interventions

o Behavioral, cognitive, interpersonal, and marital therapies all have documented  efficacy

o Psychotherapy may reduce risk of relapse (although may need to continue therapy) • Medication

o SSRIs are effective for at least some individuals

o The combined of therapy and medication may be optimal (and this may be  particularly true among adolescents and among those with severe depression)

Treatment of Bipolar Disorder 

• Lithium, antiseizure medication (Depakote, Lamictal), atypical antipsychotics (Abilify) • Frontline treatment

o unethical in most cases to treat bipolar disorder without medication o Active mania = damage to the brain if sustained

o Significantly reduce risk of relapse and suicide

o Depressive phase of bipolar disorder can be very difficult to manage o Still not clear exactly how mood stabilizers work (but dopamine and serotonin are  clearly involved)

• Adjunctive psychotherapy

o Family­focused Therapy (David Miklowitz)

o Psychoeducation

o Reduce "Expressed Emotion" in the family

o Helpful to minimize risk of relapse

Depressive and Bipolar Disorders 

Part I: Definitions and Causes 

March 6, 2018 

Depressive and Bipolar Disorders 

• Dramatic set of disorders that captures people's interest

• Present across the lifespan

• Present across cultures, economic strata

• Huge individual and societal costs

o Millions meet criteria

o Economic costs = billions of dollars each year

o Incredible human suffering

DSM­5 Major Depressive Episode 

A) 5 or more of the following in a 2 week period

o Depressed mood (emotional)

o Diminished pleasure in activities (anhedonia, emotional)

o Significant weight loss or weight gain (physical)

o Insomnia or hypersomnia nearly every day (physical)

o Psychomotor agitation or retardation nearly every day (behavioral) o Fatigue or loss of energy nearly every day (physical)

o Feel worthless or excessive / inappropriate guilt (cognitive)

o Diminished ability to think or concentrate (cognitive)

o Recurrent thoughts of death, suicidal thoughts or attempts (multiple) B) Symptoms cause clinically significant impairment

C) Not due to substance use or medical condition

DSM­5: 

Manic Episode 

• A distinct period of abnormal mood (at least 1 week)

o elevated

o expansive

o irritable

• Other features

o Inflated self­esteem / grandiosity

o Decreased need for sleep

o Pressured speech

o flight of ideas

o Distractibility

o Increased goal directed activity

o Excessive involvement in pleasurable activities with potential for negative 

consequences

• Significant impairment

Other Mood Episodes 

• Dysthymic Episode

o Similar symptoms to depression

o Less severe

o Longer duration:  at least 2 years

• Hypomanic Episode

o Persistent elevated mood

o Less severe but similar to mania

o Not severe enough to lead to hospitalization, generally less impairment • Mixed Episode

o Symptoms of mania and depression at the same time

DSM­5 Depressive and Bipolar Disorders  

• Major Depressive Disorder ("unipolar")

o At least one major depressive episode

o No current or previous manic or hypomanic episode

• Persistent Depressive Disorder

o Chronic low grade depressed mood (2+ years)

• Bipolar I

o At least one manic episode 

o Nearly all will eventually have a major depressive episode • Bipolar II

o Hypomania

o Current or past major depressive episode

• Cyclothymic Disorder

o Chronic, fluctuating mood disturbance

o Separate periods of hypomanic and depressive symptoms

o Up to half will eventually meet criteria for Bipolar I

Other Specifying Features of 

Depressive and Bipolar Disorders  

• Melancholic features

o Profound depressed mood, despair, little or no pleasure

o Major physical slowing, exhaustion

• Psychotic features

o Delusional thinking

o Hallucinations

• Peripartum onset / postpartum

o Occur first immediately after birth of child

o often severe with psychotic features

o Very high risk if premorbid mood episode (up to 50X) o Risk increases in subsequent births after the first episode • Seasonal pattern

o Regular seasonal pattern to episodes

o Full remissions occur at a regular time of year

Prevalence 

• Major Depression

o Lifetime prevalence: 20% (at least)

o 1­ year prevalence: 8 ­ 10%

o Equal rates in males and females before puberty

o 2 or 3X more common among women after puberty

• Bipolar I and II

o Lifetime prevalence: 3 ­ 5%

o 1­year prevalence: 2 ­ 3%

o equal rates in men and women

• Cyclothymic Disorder

o Lifetime prevalence: 1%

o 1­year prevalence: < 1%

o Equal rates in men and women

Why is depression more common among women?

Why is depression more common among women?

Depressive and Bipolar Disorders and Impairment 

• Academic functioning

o Lower grades

o Higher rates of dropped classes, drop out of school

• Social functioning

o Friendships, romantic relationships

o parenting

• Occupational functioning

o among the top five causes of lost wages / productivity • "Life" functioning

o Driving impairment

o Exercise less

o Poor money management

o Suicide: as high as 10 ­ 20%

Course of Depressive and Bipolar Disorders  

• Onset

o Wide range from childhood through 50s

o Average: early 20s (and getting younger)

• Developmental precursors

o Low level symptoms are present for years before the first episode

o Severe stress often precedes onset (not required for diagnosis)

• Clinical Course

o "spontaneous" recovery between episodes

o very rare to have a single episode

o each subsequent episode is typically more severe

• "Rapid­cycling" depressive or bipolar disorder

o 4+ episodes per year

o 90% female

20 years in the life of a hypothetical individual with multiple episodes of major depression Family Studies of Depression and Bipolar I: Some shared family risk and some risk factors unique to Bipolar I

Depression and Bipolar disorder run in the same families (Black = Bipolar, split = depression, White = no diagnosis) Heritability of depression, bipolar, and anxiety disorders

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here