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BYU-I - CHEM 101 - EXAM 6 Study Guide - Study Guide

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BYU-I - CHEM 101 - EXAM 6 Study Guide - Study Guide

School: Brigham Young University - Idaho
Department: Chemistry
Course: Introduction to General Chemistry
Professor: Robert Willis
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: General Chemistry
Name: EXAM 6 Study Guide
Description: Gas Laws, Intermolecular Forces.
Uploaded: 03/19/2018
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background image EXAM TWO STUDY GUIDE  Gases Kinetic Theory of Gases- Gases move rapidly in straight lines - Have essentially no attractive or repulsive forces
- Has very small volumes compared to the volume they occupy
- Kinetic energy increases with an increase in temperature 
Gases have Four Properties - Pressure (atm, mmHg, torr)
- Volume (L)
- Temperature (Kelvin)
- Moles (moles) 
Gas Pressure- force acting on a specific area, in units of atm (atmospheres) 
mmHg (millimeters of Mercury), and Torr (after some scientist dude)
 Pressure = Force/Area
One atm=760 mm Hg= torr
Boyle’s Law- Pressure of a gas is inversely related to its volume when T and n
are constant. If volume decreases, pressure decreases. P1V1=V2P2
PV in breathing- the lungs expand, pressure decreases, air flows into the 
lower pressure. 
Boyle’s Law Charles Law= The relationship between Temp and Volume - Kelvin goes up, Volume goes up. V1/T1=V2/T2 Guy-Lussac’s Law - Pressure exerted by a gas is directly related to the Temp in Kelvin,  making V and n constant.  P 1 /T 1 =P 2 /T 2 THE GAS LAW PV/T=PV/T all of the gas laws combined.  STP= Standard Temperature and Pressure- 273 K or 0 C
and 1 atm (760 mm Hg) 
Molar Volume- at STP 1 mol of gas occupies a volume of 22.4. Can be used as
a conversion pressure. 
Density = Molar Mass/Molar Volume, at STP
background image The IDEAL Gas Law Pv=nRT Pressure*Volume=nMoles*Universal Gas Constant*T
universal Gas Constant=always the same value-Pressure*Volume/Temp
In ATM it is .0821
In mmHg is is 62.4
N can also be Moles Divided by Grams Avagadro’s Law: Volume and Moles- the volume of a gas is directly related to 
the number of moles of gas. V1/m1=V2/m2
If given STP you can just use a picket fence and the gas constant, but if not, 
you have to first use a picket fence to find the molar mass, then plug that 
into PvNerT. 
Volume always must be the same, either mL or L in PVNERT  Molar Volume- No matter what element, at STP 1 mol of gas occupies 22.4 L, 
the molar Volume. Can be used as a equivalent in equations. 
Density of a Gas at STP- Molar Mass/Molar Volume (don’t forget polyatomics!) Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressure - Pressures depend on the total number of particles, not on the types. 
- The total pressures exerted by gases in a mixture is the sum of the 
particle pressure of those gasses. The part. Pressure is usually given in 
the problem. 
ATTRACTIVE FORCES or INTERMOLECULAR FORCES (IMFs) Ionic compounds- electrons are transferred. Strong attractive forces, holding 
positive and negative ions together
Covalent Compounds, there are three kinds, in order of strength. 
1. Hydrogen bonding- Polar covalent made with strong dipole attractions  when hydrogens are bonded directly to F, O, N.  2. Dipole-dipole- Any other Polar covalent compounds where one element is more electronegative than another and a dipole is formed.  3. Dispersion- weak attractions between nonpolar covalent molecules The higher the attraction force, the harder it is for the substance to reach 
a boiling point. Ionic bonds require huge amounts of energy, and thus the 
highest melting points. 
State Changes!- Melting- solid to liquid, Freezing- liquid to solid, 
Sublimation- When solid goes to a gas, Gas to a solid- deposition, 
Condensation- gas to liquid, Vaporization-liquid to gas 

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Join more than 18,000+ college students at Brigham Young University - Idaho who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Brigham Young University - Idaho
Department: Chemistry
Course: Introduction to General Chemistry
Professor: Robert Willis
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: General Chemistry
Name: EXAM 6 Study Guide
Description: Gas Laws, Intermolecular Forces.
Uploaded: 03/19/2018
3 Pages 38 Views 30 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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