×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to The U - Psy 1010 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to The U - Psy 1010 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

THE U / Psychology / PSY 1010 / Can our minds simultaneously operate?

Can our minds simultaneously operate?

Can our minds simultaneously operate?

Description

School: University of Utah
Department: Psychology
Course: Introductory Psychology
Professor: Barnes
Term: Fall 2015
Tags: Psychology, development, consciousness, sleep, adolescent, Ageing, Drugs, cognitive, brain, maturation, learning, and conditioning
Cost: 50
Name: PSY 1010 – Exam II Study Guide
Description: This study guide contains all of the material that will be covered on the second exam.
Uploaded: 03/20/2018
82 Pages 32 Views 5 Unlocks
Reviews


PSY 1010 – Exam II Study Guide


Can our minds simultaneously operate?



Definitions Key Concepts 

­ "Consciousness" Video ­

Consciousness: our awareness of ourselves and our environment

∙ Different states of consciousness

 Occur spontaneously ­ daydreaming, drowsiness, dreaming

 Physiologically induced ­ hallucinations, orgasm, food, oxygen, starvation  Psychologically induced ­ sensory deprivation, hypnosis, meditation

Note: the mind and the brain are not the same thing

∙ The mind arises from the brain, but is not reducible to biology

∙ The brain creates and controls the mind

∙ Our mental states can influence our physical states


When do circadian rythms occur?



If you want to learn more check out What are taken into consideration when conduting swot analysis?

Dual Processing 

∙ Our minds simultaneously operate in two ways

1. Unconscious ­ implicit

 We intuitively make use of information we are not consciously aware of 2. Conscious ­ explicit

 We process only a small part of all that we experience

∙ Not the same thing as multi­tasking

§ In multi­tasking, you are consciously switching attention between tasks § There is a delay when switching attention to complex tasks (don't text and drive) Don't forget about the age old question of How were the storming of the bastille and the women's march?

Note: we can only consciously process a fraction of all the bits of information we can perceive at any moment

∙ Selective attention

∙ Cocktail party effect: your ability to attend to only one voice among many, and you can  hear someone say your name in a nearby conversation


What are the phases of sleep according to american academy of sleep medicine?



If you want to learn more check out How glucose is modified into glycogen?

∙ Non­conscious processing

Inattentional blindness: failing to perceive visible objects when our attention is directed  elsewhere

∙ Daniel Simons is famous for researching and showing people failures of attention Change blindness: failing to notice a change in the environment

Split Consciousness in Vision 

∙ Visual perception track ­ recognizes the world

∙ Visual action track ­ guides actions

∙ Blindsight ­ no conscious awareness of obstacles

 People who are perceptually blind in a certain area of their visual field  demonstrate some responses to visual stimuli; caused by injury to the occipital lobe  They may avoid an obstacle they cannot "see"

 Can predict location or type of movement of a stimulus in a forced­choice  test

­ "Sleep" Video ­ If you want to learn more check out What are gnostic units for?

Biological Rhythms and Sleep 

∙ Circadian rhythms occur on a 24­hour cycle and include sleep and wakefulness  Body temperature begins to rise in the morning, peaks during the day, then falls at night We also discuss several other topics like What are stored in the semantic memory?

 Light triggers the suprachiasmatic nuclease to decrease (morning) melatonin from the pineal gland in the morning, when there is more light, and increase (evening) it at  nightfall, when light is decreasing

 Suprachiasmatic nucleus is in the hypothalamus

 Artificial light messes with your circadian rhythm  If you want to learn more check out How many types of network are there?

∙ Circadian rhythms are slightly different for different ages

 Older people tend to be more alert in the morning

 Younger people tend to be more alert at night

 This shift begins around age 20

∙ Thinking is sharpest and memory most accurate when we are at our daily peak ∙ Adolescence and sleep

 Teenagers experience delayed sleep preference

 Their melatonin levels typically rise a couple of hours after the rest of ours do  Left to their own devices, teens would stay up longer and sleep in longer  School districts who have changed their schedules to accommodate this delay  find:

 Significant increases in test scores and performance

 Decreases in tardiness and missed school days

 Decreases in behavioral problems

 Decreases in traffic accidents involving teen drivers

∙ Sleep stages

 American Academy of Sleep Medicine classifications

 Phases of sleep

 NREM1 ­ lightest sleep

 NREM2 

 NREM3 ­ deepest sleep

 REM ­ phase during which dreaming, and rapid eye movement occurs  As the night wears on, NREM­3 shortens, and disappears

 REM and NREM­2 phases get longer ­ these are phases during which we  think learning and neural connections are strengthened

 NREM­3 is when night terrors, sleep­walking, and bedwetting are most likely to  occur

 Also the phase in which you are most difficult to awaken

 Sleep cycles about every 90 minutes

 Sleep cycles more quickly for older adults, and they experience less of the  deep, NREM­3 sleep

 With each cycle, NREM­3 sleep decreases, and REM sleep increases  You will have more than 100,000 dreams over a typical lifetime

∙ Brain waves

 REM waves

 NREM­1 waves are also called alpha waves

 NREM­2 waves are theta waves

 NREM­3 waves are delta waves; they are slower and bigger

∙ Theories about whey we sleep

 Protects ­ kept our ancestors out of harm's way at night

 Helps us recover ­ restores and repairs brain tissue

 Helps us remember ­ restores and builds fading memories

 Boosts creative thinking ­ ponder a problem just before bed, sleep on it  Supports growth ­ newborn babies need a lot of sleep

 During sleep, the pituitary gland releases growth hormones

∙ Sleep deprivation

 Suppressed immune system

 7 hours or less = 3x more likely than those who got 8 hours or more to  succumb to a cold virus

 Increased irritability ­ poor emotional regulation

 Worse decision making, memory, and reaction time

 Cardiac problems ­ increases inflammation and arthritis

 Overeating, weight gain, obesity

 Poor concentration

 Increased risk of accidents

 Increased risk of depression

 Undermines goals

∙ Learning and sleep

 Sleep helps you consolidate and recall what you learned the day before  You will be more successful if you study and then sleep rather than stay up all  night cramming

 What you study or do in the 5 minutes before you fall asleep is usually forgotten  You can learn basic associations in your sleep (sound with a smell, for instance)  You can't learn a 2nd language, calculus, or other material by playing an audio  recording while you sleep

∙ Sleep disorders

 Insomnia: trouble falling and staying asleep

 1 in 10 people have it (1 in 4 older adults)

 Narcolepsy: sudden bouts of sleepiness, at inopportune times (even when excited)  People fall asleep for 5 minutes or less, usually triggered by strong  emotions (anger, happiness, sex)

 1 in 2,000 people have it

 Sleep apnea: oxygen starved; wake up repeatedly during the night, but are  unaware of the awakenings

 Leaves us sleepy, grumpy, irritable

 Risk factors include being male, overweight

 Snoring, exhaustion are signs of this

 1 in 20 people have it

 Night terrors: distinct from nightmares; happen early in the night (first few hours  of sleep, during NREM­3), mostly in children; appear terrified and awake, but don't  recall it the next day

 Sleep­walking and sleep­talking

 Walking

 Usually occurs in NREM­3 sleep

 Sleep deprivation can increase the likelihood

 Talking

 Can occur in any sleep phase

 Few recall it the next day

 Runs in families (genetic component)

 Developmentally normal (20% walk, 5% repeatedly walk)

 Fades as you age

∙ Natural sleep aids

 Exercise regularly but not in the late evening (late afternoon is best)  Avoid caffeine after early afternoon

 Avoid food and drink near bedtime ­ exception would be a glass of milk  Relax before bedtime, using dimmer light

 Sleep on a regular schedule and avoid long naps

 Hide the time so you aren't tempted to check repeatedly

 Reassure yourself that temporary sleep loss causes no great harm  Focus your mind on nonarousing, engaging thoughts

 If all else fails, settle for less sleep (either going to bed later or getting up earlier) ∙ Dreaming

 Interrupting sleep when dreamers are hitting REM sleep, and memory for newly  learned tasks is worse the next day

 Although memory consolidation may also happen in other phases  Deprive people of REM sleep, and they experience REM rebound: spending much more time than usual in REM sleep when they are finally allowed to sleep unimpaired ∙ Function of dreams

 Freud ­ unconscious wish fulfillment

 Neo­Freudians ­ way for the unconscious to communicate with the conscious  mind

 Information processing theory ­ a way for the mind to sift, sort, and process the  day's activities

 Physiologically ­ dreams stimulate neural pathways

 May function to develop and preserve them

 Cognitive development theory ­ dreaming may aid brain maturation and cognitive development

 Activation­synthesis theory ­ dreams are the brain's attempt to make sense of  random neural activity

­ "Drugs and Consciousness" Video ­

Dependence and Addiction 

∙ Continued use of a psychoactive drug produces tolerance

 With repeated exposure to a drug, the drug's effect lessens

 It takes greater quantities to get the desired effect

∙ Neuroadaptation: brain chemistry adapts to offset the effect of the drug ∙ Addiction: a craving for a chemical substance, despite its adverse consequences (physical and psychological)

∙ Withdrawal: upon stopping use of a drug (after addiction), users may experience the  undesirable effects of withdrawal

∙ Dependence: absence of a drug may lead to a feeling of physical pain, intense cravings  (physical dependence), and negative emotions (psychological dependence) ∙ Misconceptions about addiction

 Addictive drugs quickly corrupt ­ some take a long time

 Addiction cannot be overcome voluntarily ­ many smokers and other addicts quit  on their own

 Addiction is no different than repetitive pleasure­seeking behaviors ­ we use the  term as a metaphor, but a true addiction is both compulsive and dysfunctional ∙ Psychoactive drug: a chemical substance that alters perceptions and mood (affects  consciousness)

 Divided into three groups

1. Depressants: drugs that reduce neural activity and slow body functions  Alcohol ­ affects motor skills, judgment, and memory, and 

increases aggressiveness while reducing self awareness and self­control;  slows nervous system (which includes brain)

 Lowers inhibitions (up to 80% of sexual assaults on college

campuses involve alcohol)

 Can cause blackouts

 Suppresses REM sleep

 Binge drinking during adolescence may be especially 

harmful (changes structure of the brain)

 Alcohol use disorder puts you at risk for lung, brain, and 

liver damage

 Girls and young women become addicted to alcohol more 

quickly because they have less stomach enzymes that digest alcohol

 Barbiturates: drugs that depress the activity of the central nervous  system, reducing anxiety but impairing memory and judgement

 Tranquilizers 

 Nembutal, Seconal, and Amytal are some (often 

prescribed) examples

 Can be lethal when combined with alcohol

 Opiates: depress neural activity, temporarily lessening pain and  anxiety

 Opium, morphine, heroin

 Highly addictive

 Includes narcotics (codeine, morphine, methadone are  prescription forms)

2. Stimulants: drugs that excite neural activity and speed up body functions  Caffeine and nicotine ­ increase heart and breathing rates and other autonomic functions to provide energy

 Cocaine ­ induces immediate euphoria followed by a crash  Crack (form of cocaine that can be smoked), other forms  may be sniffed or injected

 May lead to increased aggression, emotional disturbance,  suspiciousness, convulsions, cardiac arrest, respiratory failure

 Ecstasy (or Methylenedioxymethamphetamine or MDMA) ­ mild  hallucinogen

 Produces a euphoric high but over time can damage  serotonin­producing neurons, which results in a permanent deflation  of mood and impairment of memory

 Meth ­ triggers the release of dopamine, which affects mood and  energy levels

 Over time can reduce the baseline dopamine levels, leaving the use with permanently depressed functioning

 Irritability, insomnia, hypertension, seizures, depression,  social isolation, occasional violent outbursts

 Amphetamines, methamphetamines

3. Hallucinogens: psychedelic (mind­manifesting) drugs that distort  perceptions and evoke sensory images in the absence of sensory input  LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide) ­ powerful hallucinogenic drug  that is also known as acid

 MDMA (Ecstasy)

 THC (delta­9­tetrahydrocannabinol) ­ the major active ingredient  in marijuana that triggers a variety of effects, including mild 

hallucinations

 Marijuana

 Mild hallucinogen, amplifies sensitivity to sounds, tastes,  colors, and smells

 Relaxes, disinhibits, may produce euphoria

 May impair motor coordination, perception, and reaction  time

 Lingers in the body

 Repeated use, especially in adolescence, increases the risk 

of addiction

 Teens who use marijuana are at a higher risk for anxiety 

and depression

 Heavy users (20 years) linked to shrinkage of memory and 

emotional centers in the brain, IQ may also suffer

 Marijuana smoke is toxic, and can cause lung damage, 

cancer, and complications in pregnancy

­ "States of Consciousness" Reading ­

Consciousness: the awareness or deliberate perception of a stimulus

∙ Meant to indicate awareness

Levels of Awareness 

∙ Low awareness

 Cue: a stimulus that has a particular significance to the perceive (e.g., a sight or  sound that has special relevance to the person who saw or heard it)

 Priming: the activation of certain thoughts or feelings that make them easier to  think of and act upon

 Implicit associations test (IAT): a computer reaction time test that measures a  person's automatic associations with concepts

 Very difficult test to fake because it records automatic reactions that occur in milliseconds

 Cost ­ influenced by subtle factors

 Benefit ­ saves mental effort

∙ High awareness

 Includes effortful attention and careful decision making

 Mindfulness: a state of heightened focus on the thoughts passing through one's  head, as well as a more controlled evaluation of those thoughts 

 Research has shown that when you engage in more deliberate consideration, you  are less persuaded by irrelevant yet biasing influences

 Associated with recognizing when you're using a stereotype, rather than fairly  evaluating another person

 Flexible Correction Model: the ability for people to correct or change their beliefs and evaluations if they believe these judgments have been biased 

 Cost ­ uses mental effort

 Benefit ­ can overcome some biases

∙ Note: humans alternate between low and high thinking states

 We have neural networks for both

Other States of Awareness 

∙ Hypnosis: the state of consciousness whereby a person is highly responsive to the  suggestions of another

 An actual, document phenomenon

 Usually involves a dissociation with one's environment and an intense focus on a  single stimulus, which is usually accompanied by a sense of relaxation

 Dissociation: the heightened focus on one stimulus or thought such that  many other things around you are ignored; a disconnect between one's 

awareness of their environment and the one object the person is focusing on  As a consequence of dissociation, a person is less effortful, and less self conscious in consideration of his or her own thoughts and behaviors

 Franz Mesmer is often credited as among the first people to "discover" hypnosis,  which he used to treat members of elite society who were experiencing psychological  distress

 To be hypnotized, you must first want to be hypnotized (i.e., you can't be  hypnotized against your will)

 Once you are hypnotized, you won't do anything you wouldn't also do  while in a more natural state of consciousness

 Hypnotherapy: the use of hypnotic techniques such as relaxation and suggestion  to help engineer desirable change such as lower pain or quitting smoking  Still used in a variety of formats

 Modern hypnotherapy often uses a combination of relaxation, suggestion,  motivation, and expectancies to create a desired mental or behavioral state  Trance states: a state of consciousness characterized by the experience of "out­of body possession," or an acute dissociation between one's self and the current, physical environment surrounding them

 People in this state are said to have less voluntary control over their  behaviors and actions

 Often occur in religious ceremonies, where the person believes he or she is "possessed" by an otherworldly being or force

 The body of research investigating this phenomenon tends to reject the  claim that these experiences constitute an "altered state of consciousness" ∙ Sleep 

 Unique state of consciousness ­ lacks full awareness but the brain is still active  Melatonin: a hormone associated with increased drowsiness and sleep  Circadian rhythm: the physiological sleep­wake cycle

 Influenced by exposure to sunlight as well as daily schedule and activity  Biologically, it includes changes in body temperature, blood pressure and  blood sugar

 Jet lag: the state of being fatigued and/or having difficulty adjusting to a  new time zone after traveling a long distance

 Stages

 NREM­1: ­ falling asleep stage marked by theta waves 

 NREM­2 ­ considered light sleep; occasional high intensity brain waves;  makes up about 55% of all sleep

 NREM­3 ­ marked by greater muscle relaxation and the appearance of  delta waves; makes up between 20­25% of all sleep

 REM ­ marked by rapid eye movement; similar to wakefulness in terms of brain activity; accounts for 20% of all sleep; associated with dreaming

 Dreams

 All humans dream

 We dream at every stage, but dreams during REM sleep are especially  vivid

∙ Psychoactive drugs

 Hallucinogens: substances that, when ingested, alter a person's perceptions, often  by creating hallucinations that are not real or distorting their perceptions of time  Marijuana, LSD, MDMA, etc.

 Euphoria: an intense feeling of pleasure, excitement or happiness  Depressants: a class of drugs that slow down the body's physiological and mental  processes

 Alcohol is the most widely used depressant

 Blood alcohol content (BAC): a measure of the percentage of alcohol  found in a person's blood

 Measure is typically the standard used to determine the extent to  which a person is intoxicated

 At .3 ­ .4%, there is a serious risk of death

 Opiates: stimulate endorphin production in the brain; often used as pain  killers by medical professionals

 Highly addictive

 Stimulants: a class of drugs that speed up the body's physiological and mental  processes

 Caffeine ­ the drug found in coffee and tea

 Nicotine ­ the active drug in cigarettes and other tobacco products

­ "Cognitive Development I ­ Children's Brains" Video ­

Cognitive Development 

∙ How does the brain change during infancy and childhood?

 Synaptogenesis: the production of new synapses or connections

 Happens fastest during infancy

 Young children have several times the number of synaptic connections  that adults do

 Synaptic pruning: unused or unnecessary connections are pruned away, or lost  Follows synaptogenesis

 Period of synaptogenesis and synaptic pruning are also seen during  puberty

 Synaptogenesis and pruning happen throughout life, but the biggest, most  explosive period is in early childhood

 Myelination: the process of covering neural axons with fatty tissue  Speeds neural communication markedly

 Different parts of the brain are myelinating at different times

 Sensory cortex happens during the first year

 Motor cortex happens during the second year

 Higher brain areas, association areas, are myelinating into 

adulthood

 Sometimes you can see how slow young children are to react

 They fall down, but don't instantly cry

 Experience

 Can account for 10­20% of differences in myelination

 Give your child experience ­ move, explore, experiment, talk to them, play with them, encourage them, etc.

∙ Experience matters

 Experience­expectant process

 Species come pre­wired to interpret their environments

 If the environment is species­typical, then development proceeds  "normally" across individual members

 Ex. we are pre­wired to learn language, but we need the 

environmental input in order to develop language

 Experience­dependent process

 Some experiences are not species ­typical

 Exposure to these experiences will create individual differences in  brain structure (and function)

 Ex. learning to play an instrument (an experience that only some  children get ­ it changes neural connections)

∙ Abuse and neglect

 Chronic abuse and neglect leave changes in brain functioning

 Abused children are more reactive to hearing angry speech

 They detect signs of anger in faces faster than non­abused children  Changes in serotonin functioning may pre­dispose them to be aggressive  They are at increased risk for substance abuse disorder; depression and  anxiety with particular gene alleles

 "It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men," ­ Frederick  Douglass

∙ Comparing adult and child brains

 Synaptic plasticity is greatest in infancy

 When unused neurons die, we lost potential connections

 With age, ability to form new synapses decreases, but it is still there  Degree to which experience can change the brain

 Intensity (or repetition) of the experience needed to produce  change also increases

 Flexibility 

 Plasticity ensures that we can continue to adapt to different environments  over time (infant environment doesn't have to be the same as adult environment)  We are inefficient thinkers and processers as infants ­ takes more effort,  slower, and less complex

 Specialization and efficiency

 (Commitment) of neurons to a specific activity decreases plasticity, but  increases efficiency 

 Babies' brains are more flexible, but less efficient than adults'

 Ex. face recognition of lemurs

 Babies can recognize lemurs by their faces, adults can't ­ babies  lose this ability sometime around the end of the first year

∙ Children's minds vs. adult minds

 We no longer assume that children's brains are just immature versions of adult  brains

 Critical question ­ how are children's brains specifically adapted to the child's (not the adult's) environment?

 Early learning

 When exposure to stimuli is species­atypical, patterns of development are  affected (there are both gains and losses)

 In many cases, starting training too early looks like it actually delays  learning and harms performance (animal models)

 Ex. baby monkeys who are trained too early can begin to do a task, but they do not master it as quickly as baby monkeys that are trained on 

that same task when they are a few months older

 Children are less motivated and less interested in tasks than those  who are trained when they are older

 Chronotopic constraints on brain development

 The way early developing regions process information "filters" or  constrains the ways in which later developing regions can process information

­ "Cognitive Development II ­ Children's Minds" Video ­

Jean Piaget (1986­1980) 

∙ Swiss epistemologist

 Studied how we acquire knowledge

∙ Developed the most comprehensive and influential theory of children's cognitive  development

∙ Development of children's minds

 We develop by trying to makes sense of our experiences

 We build conceptual schemas

 We assimilate new information into existing schemas

 We accommodate schemas (adjust them, build new ones) when new information  doesn't fit

∙ Four stages of cognitive development

 Sensorimotor stage (birth­2 years)

 Understands world/learn through senses and "motor" operations  (movements)

 Explore the world with fingers, mouth, etc.

 Object permanence (at about 6 months)

 Violation of expectation procedures and math, physics, etc.

 Pre­operational stage (2­7 years)

 Magical thinking

 Ego­centrism

 Cannot conserve or reverse operations

 Development of symbolic thought, language, and pretend play

 Understands the world through language and mental images

 Theory of mind

 Concrete operational stage (7­12 years)

 Understands the world through logical thinking and categories

 Kids can think logically, but not hypothetically

 Children know that if you cut a sandwich in half, you still has as  much sandwich as a whole

 Can mentally reverse operations in a way that younger children can't  Can concentrate on more than one dimension

 They know that a (1) shorter and (2) wider container can hold as  much liquid as a (1) taller and (2) thinner one

 They can do conservation (decentration, reversibility)

 Kids can do seriations: order items along a continuum

 Can also do this mentally with transitive inference (if A is bigger  than B, and B is bigger than C, which is bigger, A or C?)

 Spatial reasoning improves (map drawing, direction giving, mentally  rotating for perspective, etc.)

 Formal operational (12+ years)

 Understands world through hypothetical thinking and scientific reasoning  Abstract thinking, including higher moral reasoning

 Hypothetic­deductive reasoning

 Given a problem, can isolate variables to solve

 Can deduce specific applications, given a general rule

 Can inductively reason 

Lev Vygotsky  

∙ Born in 1896, contemporary of Piaget's 

∙ Russian born during the Soviet era

 World didn't discover him until the late 1900s

∙ Died young in 1934

∙ Socio­cultural developmental theory

 Children's thinking abilities develop through a process of being scaffolded by  parents (and others)

 Everything is learned first on the social plane (between parent and child), and then on the psychological plane (internal)

 Importance of speech

 Mom directs through speech

 Later the child directs himself through speech

 Then speech goes internal ­ you have thinking

­ "Cognitive Development III ­ Children's Social Development" Video ­ John Bowlby, M.D. 

∙ British psychoanalyst

∙ Said that children have an innate propensity to seek and maintain proximity to their  caregiver to ensure survival

 This is the attachment bond ­ goes one way (child ­­> parent)

∙ Attachment theory ­ says that a child's relationship with their primary caregiver is the  template, or foundation, on which social understanding, development, and close  relationships are built

 Attachment: an enduring emotional bond, characterized by the tendency to seek  and maintain proximity to a specific person, particularly under stress

∙ Quality of attachment

 Secure (65%)

 Relates to…

 Better social skills in preschoolers

 Better relationship with parents

 Less trouble in adolescence

 Better relationships with romantic partners in young adulthood  Internal working model: a set of expectations about interactions  Anxious/avoidant (20%)

 Anxious/ambivalent (resistant) (10­15%)

 Disorganized (5­10%)

∙ Stability of attachment style

 Attachment style is resistant to change

 Roughly 85% of adults have the same attachment style as when they were infants  What predicts change?

 Changes in the relationship with the caregiver

 Intimate relationship with a romantic partner

 A person can have an "earned secure" style by working at it

∙ Father care

 Mothers get studied more often than fathers

 Father's involvement predicts better outcomes for children (high school  achievement, fewer behavioral problems)

 Fathers add a unique component (e.g., play styles)

∙ Temperament

 Precursor to personality

 There is a strong genetic component

 Shyness is one component of temperament that has been well studied  Children who are extremely shy or extremely outgoing tend to stay that  way

 Children in the middle of the shy spectrum tend to move around a bit  With shy kids especially, there are psychological differences in reactivity  to a new situation

 Some kids have difficult temperaments, some have easy ones

 The trick is "goodness of fit," meaning that it is the interaction of caregiving and  temperament that matters

­ "Social and Personality Development in Childhood" Reading ­

Note: childhood social and personality development emerges through the interaction of social  influences, biological maturation, and the child’s representations of the social world and the self ∙ Understanding social and personality development requires looking at children from three perspectives that interact to shape development

1. The social context in which each child lives, especially the relationships that  provide security, guidance, and knowledge

2. Biological maturation that supports developing social and emotional  competencies and underlies temperamental individuality

3. Children’s developing representations of themselves and the social world.

Relationships 

∙ Virtually all infants living in normal circumstances develop strong emotional attachments to those who care for them

∙ Attachments have evolved in humans because they promote children’s motivation to stay  close to those who care for them and, as a consequence, to benefit from the learning,  security, guidance, warmth, and affirmation that close relationships provide

∙ Infants become securely attached when their parents respond sensitively to them,  reinforcing the infants’ confidence that their parents will provide support when needed  Infants become insecurely attached when care is inconsistent or neglectful  These infants tend to respond avoidantly, resistantly, or in a disorganized  manner

 Such insecure attachments are not necessarily the result of deliberately bad  parenting but are often a byproduct of circumstances

∙ To assess the nature of attachment, researchers use a standard laboratory procedure called the “Strange Situation,” which involves brief separations from the caregiver (e.g., mother) ∙ Security of attachment: an infant’s confidence in the sensitivity and responsiveness of a  caregiver, especially when he or she is needed

 An important cornerstone of social and personality development

 Infants and young children who are securely attached have been found to develop  stronger friendships with peers, more advanced emotional understanding and early  conscience development, and more positive self­concepts, compared with insecurely  attached children

∙ Authoritative: a parenting style characterized by high (but reasonable) expectations for  children’s behavior, good communication, warmth and nurturance, and the use of reasoning (rather than coercion) as preferred responses to children’s misbehavior

 By contrast, some less­constructive parent­child relationships result from  authoritarian (high expectations/control, low warmth/responsiveness), uninvolved  (low expectations/control, low warmth/responsiveness), or permissive parenting  styles (low expectations/control, high warmth/responsiveness)

∙ Family Stress Model: a description of the negative effects of family financial difficulty  on child adjustment through the effects of economic stress on parents’ depressed mood,  increased marital problems, and poor parenting

∙ Peer relationships

 Social interaction with another child who is similar in age, skills, and knowledge  provokes the development of many social skills that are valuable for the rest of life  Children learn how to initiate and maintain social interactions with other children  Being accepted by other children is an important source of affirmation and self esteem, but peer rejection can foreshadow later behavior problems (especially when  children are rejected due to aggressive behavior)

Social Understanding 

∙ Young children begin developing social understanding very early in life  Before the end of the first year, infants are aware that other people have  perceptions, feelings, and other mental states that affect their behavior, and which are  different from the child’s own mental states

∙ Social referencing: the process by which one individual (child) consults another’s  (mother's) emotional expressions to determine how to evaluate and respond to  circumstances that are ambiguous or uncertain

 If the mother looks calm and reassuring, the infant responds positively as if the  situation is safe

 If the mother looks fearful or distressed, the infant is likely to respond with  wariness or distress because the mother’s expression signals danger

∙ Theory of mind: children’s growing understanding of the mental states that affect  people’s behavior

Personality 

∙ Temperament: early emerging differences in reactivity and self­regulation, which  constitutes a foundation for personality development

 Although temperament is biologically based, it interacts with the influence of  experience from the moment of birth (if not before) to shape personality

∙ More generally, personality is shaped by the goodness of fit between the child’s  temperamental qualities and characteristics of the environment

 Goodness of fit: the match or synchrony between a child’s temperament and  characteristics of parental care that contributes to positive or negative personality  development

 A good “fit” means that parents have accommodated to the child’s temperamental attributes, and this contributes to positive personality growth and better adjustment ∙ As children mature biologically, temperamental characteristics emerge and change over  time

Social and Emotional Competence 

∙ Conscience: the cognitive, emotional, and social influences that cause young children to  create and act consistently with internal standards of conduct

 Emerges from young children’s experiences with parents, particularly in the  development of a mutually responsive relationship that motivates young children to  respond constructively to the parents’ requests and expectations

∙ Effortful control: a temperament quality that enables children to be more successful in  motivated self­regulation

∙ Conscience development grows through a good fit between the child’s temperamental  qualities and how parents communicate and reinforce behavioral expectations ∙ By the end of the preschool years, for example, young children develop a “moral self” by  which they think of themselves as people who want to do the right thing, who feel badly  after misbehaving, and who feel uncomfortable when others misbehave

∙ Gender schemas: organized beliefs and expectations about maleness and femaleness that  guide children’s thinking about gender

­ "Adolescent Development" Video ­

Development 

∙ Physical (puberty)

 HPG kicks off puberty

 HPG axis may respond to

 Physical maturity

 Time (an alarm clock)

 Presence of mature sexual partners

 Nutritional resources

 Leptin (body fat >11%)

 Stress (extreme stress or no stress delays the onset of puberty ­ mid­range  stress speeds it up)

 Affected by context

 Timing of physical changes in adolescence varies by

 Regions of the world

 Socioeconomic class

 Ethnic group

 Historical era 

 Ex. first menstruation ­ U.S. average = 12­13 years old, Lumi  (New Guinea) average = 18 years old

 Growth spurt 

 Rapid acceleration in growth (height and weight)

 Simultaneous release of growth hormones, thyroid hormones, and  androgens

 Peak height velocity ­ time that adolescent is growing most quickly  Note: average female growth spurt is 2 years earlier than the average male growth spurt

 Peak height velocity ­ 4 in./year in boys, 3.5 in./year in girls (same  as toddlers)

 Physical changes

 Nearly 1/2 of adult body weight is gained during adolescence

 Extremities growth spurt first (hands, feet, head), then arms and legs, torso last

 Boys and girls enter puberty with about the same amount of muscle:fat  ratio

 Boys exit with 3:1 (muscle:fat) ratio, while girls exist with 5:4  (muscle:fat) ratio

 Adolescents need food and sleep to fuel this massive growth spurt (1.5­2  times as many calories as adults)

∙ Cognitive ("remodeling")

 Brain growth

 Limbic system comes online in early adolescence

 Front cortex (inhibitory functions, moral reasoning, decision making)  continues to develop throughout adolescence

 Miss­matched development may occur for risk of taking during  adolescence

 Piaget's stage 4 ­ formal operational thought

 Abstract, systematic, scientific thinking

 Induction and deduction

 Hypothetical­deductive reasoning (isolate variables, test and revise  hypotheses)

 Propositional thought 

 Advanced perspective taking skills ­ thinking about what others think of  me (self­consciousness)

 Better at arguing (can see multiple perspectives, anticipate 

arguments, etc.)

 Can think about the ideal and criticize

 Increased social awareness and activism

 Increased criticism, can see the gap between actual and 

idea;

 Realization that knowledge is relative ­ adults can be wrong

∙ Social (assumption of adult roles and responsibilities)

 Forming a sense of self

 This is the task of adolescence because of the formal operational thinking  capacity

 Able to induce personality traits from watching people in a variety  of situations

 Begin to understand how past experiences shape personality

 Think about the stability of traits differently than children do  Difficult to integrate different selves from different contexts

 Family relationships

 Teens who get along and are close with their parents tend to get along and  have better relationships with their friends and romantic partners

 Teens fight more with parents about mundane things than they did when  they were younger

 Fight more with moms than with dads

 Firstborns fight more than 2nd borns

 Boys tend to fight about hygiene and behavior

 Girls tend to fight about dating and friendships

 Adolescents grow increasingly more influenced by peers, and less  influenced by parents ­ still they tend to share

 Parents' political viewpoints, manners and customs, values and  ethics, and friends' fashions

 Parents report being more stressed about these disagreements than  teens

Emerging adulthood: the period between the teenage years and assuming full adult roles ∙ In wealthy countries, this time period is longer than ever before (it is a luxury of those  who can afford it)

∙ Note: in 1890, there was a 7.2­year gap/interval between menarche (first menstruation)  and marriage

 In 2006, there was a 14.2­year gap/interval

­ "Adult Development" Video ­

Changes of Adulthood 

∙ Physical changes

 Menopause: the loss of fertility in women around age 50

 Sensory abilities decline

 Vision ­ 65 year olds need 3x the light that 20 years olds need to see  (changes in the pupil, retina)

 Hearing

 Smell

 Slower reaction times, muscle strength, and stamina in older adulthood (65+)  Immune system weakens with age, but we also accumulate lots of antibodies with  ago (less short­term illness)

∙ Cognitive changes

 Brains

 Processing/reaction time speed slows ­ implications for driving, memory  Loss of brain mass, especially in the frontal lobes (loss of inhibitory  function), but physical exercise can slow down these losses

 Exercise

 Increased oxygen and nutrient flow

 Stimulates neural connections and promotes neurogenesis in the  hippocampus

 Increases cellular mitochondria

 Helps maintain telomeres

 Enhances memory and judgment

 Lowers risk of significant cognitive decline

 Cognitive changes in the brain

 Risk of Alzheimer's and Dementia increase dramatically as we age  Memory gradually declines

 Recall gets worse for new material, steady for meaningful material  Recognition memory is steady

 Prospective memory declines

 Intelligence

 Fluid intelligence (abstract, fact reasoning) declines

 Crystallized intelligence (accumulated knowledge) holds

 Wisdom increases with age

 Brain training exercises world ­ but the skills don't generalize far  Take home message = practice what you want to maintain

∙ Social changes

 Erikson ­ the world of adulthood is:

 Intimacy (young adulthood)

 Human beings tend to pair­bond; these bonds tend to last when  partners:

 Share similar interests and values

 Share emotional and financial support

 Enjoy intimate disclosure

 Take a vow (marriage)

 Marry after age 20 

 Are well education

 Don't live together before they get married

 Marriage predicts (is correlated with higher rates of):

 Sexual satisfaction

 Income

 Physical health

 Mental health

 Marriage tends to last when couples maintain a 5:1 ratio of positive to negative interactions (Gottman)

 This principle actually generalizes to other relationships as  well

 Generativity (middle adulthood) ­ caring for the rising generation  Integration (older adulthood) ­ feeling a sense of satisfaction as you look  back on life

 Emotions later in life

 Self esteem remains stable

 Emotional experiences become more complex

 Positive feelings grow

 Negative feelings subside

 Older adults attend to positive information more than negative information  Enhanced emotional control (less drama)

 Smaller social networks, fewer friendships, although they tend to be deep  Less attachment anxiety, stress, and anger

 More stable and accepting

­ "Aging" Reading ­

Note: Contemporary theories and research recognizes that biogenetic and psychological  processes of aging are complex and lifelong

Note: because of increases in average life expectancy, each new generation can expect to live  longer than their parents’ generation and certainly longer than their grandparents’ generation

Life span theory: theory of development that emphasizes the patterning of lifelong within­ and  between­person differences in the shape, level, and rate of change trajectories

Life Span and Life Course Perspectives on Aging 

∙ In each decade of adulthood, we observe substantial heterogeneity in cognitive  functioning, personality, social relationships, lifestyle, beliefs, and satisfaction with life  Heterogeneity: inter­individual and subgroup differences in level and rate of  change over time

∙ Life course theory: theory of development that highlights the effects of social  expectations of age­related life events and social roles

 Additionally, considers the lifelong cumulative effects of membership in specific  cohorts and sociocultural subgroups and exposure to historical events

 Cohort: group of people typically born in the same year or historical  period, who share common experiences over time; sometimes called a 

generation

 Complement the life­course perspective with a greater focus on processes within  the individual (e.g., the aging brain)

 Approach emphasizes the patterning of lifelong change in intra­ and inter individual differences: different patterns of development observed within an  individual (intra­) or between individuals (inter­)

 Both life course and life span researchers generally rely on longitudinal studies to  examine hypotheses about different patterns of aging associated with the effects of  biogenetic, life history, social, and personal factors

 Cross­sectional studies provide information about age­group differences,  but these are confounded with cohort, time of study, and historical effects

Cognitive Aging 

∙ Researchers have identified areas of both losses and gains in cognition in older age ∙ Cognitive ability and intelligence are often measured using standardized tests and  validated measures ­ psychometric approach: approach to studying intelligence that  examines performance on tests of intellectual functioning

 Has identified two categories of intelligence that show different rates of change  across the life span

1. Fluid intelligence: type of intelligence that relies on the ability to use  information processing resources to reason logically and solve novel problems  (ex. logical reasoning, remembering lists, spatial ability, and reaction time)

2. Crystallized intelligence: type of intellectual ability that relies on the  application of knowledge, experience, and learned information

 Measures of crystallized intelligence include vocabulary tests,  solving number problems, and understanding texts

∙ With age, systematic declines are observed on cognitive tasks requiring self­initiated,  effortful processing, without the aid of supportive memory cues

∙ Older adults tend to perform poorer than young adults on memory tasks that involve  recall: type of memory task where individuals are asked to remember previously learned  information without the help of external cues

 As we age, the following becomes less efficient ­ working memory: memory  system that allows for information to be simultaneously stored and utilized or  manipulated

 The ability to process information quickly also decreases with age ­ slowing of  processing speed: the time it takes individuals to perform cognitive operations § May explain age differences on many different cognitive tasks

 Inhibitory function: ability to focus on a subset of information while suppressing  attention to less relevant information

§ Some researchers have argued declines with age and may explain age  differences in performance on cognitive tasks

 Longitudinal research has proposed that deficits in sensory functioning explain  age differences in a variety of cognitive abilities

§ Ex. hearing, vision

Fewer age differences are observed when memory cues are available, such as for  recognition: type of memory task where individuals are asked to remember previously  learned information with the assistance of cues

Personality and Self­Related Processes 

∙ Research on adult personality examines normative age­related increases and decreases in  the expression of the so­called "Big Five" traits

1. Extraversion

2. Neuroticism

3. Conscientiousness

4. Agreeableness 

5. Openness to new experience

§ Note: longitudinal studies reveal average changes during adulthood in the  expression of some traits (e.g., neuroticism and openness decrease with age and  conscientiousness increases) and individual differences in these patterns due to  idiosyncratic life events (e.g., divorce, illness)

In contrast to the relative stability of personality traits, theories about the aging self propose changes in self­related knowledge, beliefs, and autobiographical narratives: a 

qualitative research method used to understand characteristics and life themes that an  individual considers to uniquely distinguish him­ or herself from others

§ Theory suggests that as we age, themes that were relatively unimportant in young  and middle adulthood gain in salience (e.g., generativity, health) and that people view themselves as improving over time

§ Reorganizing personal life narratives and self­descriptions are the major tasks of  midlife and young­old age due to transformations in professional and family roles and obligations

 In advanced old age, self­descriptions are often characterized by a life  review and reflections about having lived a long life

Subjective age: a multidimensional construct that indicates how old (or young) a person  feels and into which age group a person categorizes him­ or herself

§ One aspect of the self that particularly interests life span and life course  psychologists

§ After early adulthood, most people say that they feel younger than their  chronological age and the gap between subjective age and actual age generally  increases

§ Asking people how satisfied they are with their own aging assesses an evaluative  component of age identity: how old or young people feel compared to their  chronological age; after early adulthood, most people feel younger than their  chronological age

§ Feeling younger and being satisfied with one’s own aging are expressions of  positive self­perceptions of aging: an individual’s perceptions of their own aging  process

 Positive perceptions of aging have been shown to be associated with  greater longevity and health

Social Relationships 

∙ Social ties to family, friends, mentors, and peers are primary resources of information,  support, and comfort

∙ Across the life course, social ties are accumulated, lost, and transformed  Already in early life, there are multiple sources of heterogeneity in the  characteristics of each person's social network: network of people with whom an  individual is closely connected

 Social networks provide emotional, informational, and material support  and offer opportunities for social engagement

∙ Convoy model of social relations: theory that proposes that the frequency, types, and  reciprocity of social exchanges change with age

 These social exchanges impact the health and well­being of the givers and  receivers in the convoy

 Social connections that people accumulate are held together by exchanges in  social support (e.g., tangible and emotional)

 In many relationships, it is not the actual objective exchange of support that is  critical but instead the perception that support is available if needed

∙ Socioemotional selective theory: theory proposed to explain the reduction of social  partners in older adulthood ­ posits that older adults focus on meeting emotional over  information­gathering goals, and adaptively select social partners who meet this need

 To optimize the experience of positive affect, older adults actively restrict their  social life to prioritize time spent with emotionally close significant others

Emotion and Well­Being 

∙ Global subjective well­being: assesses individuals’ perceptions of and satisfaction with  their lives as a whole

 Can include questions about life satisfaction or judgments of whether individuals  are currently living the best life possible

 Age, health, personality, social support, and life experiences have been shown to  influence judgments of global well­being

 It is important to note that predictors of well­being may change as we age  What is important to life satisfaction in young adulthood can be different  in later adulthood

 Different life events influence well­being in different ways, and individuals do not often adapt back to baseline levels of well­being

 Research suggests that global well­being is highest in early and later adulthood  and lowest in midlife

∙ Hedonic well­being: component of well­being that refers to emotional experiences, often  including measures of positive (e.g., happiness, contentment) and negative affect (e.g.,  stress, sadness)

 The pattern of positive affect across the adult life span is similar to that of global  well­being

 Experiences of positive emotions such as happiness and enjoyment being  highest in young and older adulthood

 Experiences of negative affect, particularly stress and anger, tend to decrease with age

∙ Ryff’s model of psychological well­being ­ core dimensions of positive well­being  Older adults tend to report:

 Higher environmental mastery (feelings of competence and control in  managing everyday life) 

 Higher autonomy (independence)

 Lower personal growth 

 Lower purpose in life

 Similar levels of positive relations with others as younger individuals ∙ Links between health and interpersonal flourishing, or having high­quality connections  with others, may be important in understanding how to optimize quality of life in old age

Successful Aging and Longevity 

∙ Average life expectancy: mean number of years that 50% of people in a specific birth  cohort are expected to survive

 Typically calculated from birth but is also sometimes re­calculated for people  who have already reached a particular age (e.g., 65)

∙ Evidence from twin studies that suggests that genes account for only 25% of the variance  in human life spans ­ has opened new questions about implications for individuals and  society

∙ Suggestions that pathological change (e.g., dementia) is not an inevitable component of  aging and that pathology could at least be delayed until the very end of life led to theories  about successful aging: Includes three components 

 The relative avoidance of disease, disability, and risk factors like high blood  pressure, smoking, or obesity

 The maintenance of high levels of cognitive and physical functioning  Active engagement in social and productive activities 

 Note: it is recognized, however, that societal and environmental factors also play  a role and that there is much room for social change and technical innovation

­ "Sensation and Perception" Video ­

Sensation: the process of detecting physical energy (a stimulus) from the environment and  converting it into neural signals

∙ Perception: when we select, organize, and interpret our sensations

Bottom­up processing: analysis of the stimulus begins with the sense receptors and works up to  the level of the brain and mind

Top­down processing: information processing guided by higher­level mental processes as we  construct perception, drawing on our experience and expectations

∙ Involves making sense of what we are seeing

∙ Imposing meaning on the stimuli

Note: while viewing a picture of horses and riders…

∙ Bottom­up processing means we take in the lines, angles, and colors to construct an  image

∙ Top­down processing means we notice the title, the apprehension of the horses and rider,  and we "construct" additional visual images

Sensing the World 

∙ Senses are nature's gift that suit an organism's needs

∙ Exploring the senses

 What stimuli cross our threshold for conscious awareness?

 Absolute threshold: minimum stimulation needed to detect a particular stimulus  50% of the time

 Subliminal threshold: when stimuli are below one's absolute threshold for  conscious awareness

 Do subliminal message influence us?

 Yes (priming effects)

 No (no lasting change of behavior)

∙ Signal detection theory

 Whether or not we perceive a stimulus depends on:

 Experience

 Expectations 

 Motivations

 Alertness

 Signal detection theory predicts when we will perceive a signal, and when we  won't 

∙ Weber's Law

 Two stimuli must differ by a constant minimum percentage (rather than a constant amount), to be perceived as different

∙ Sensory adaptation: the idea that we have diminished sensitivity to constant stimulation  Ex. puts a band aid on your arm and after awhile you don't sense it  Helps us not become crazy ­ the world would be overwhelming if we were  constantly aware of everything

 Helps us focus on important stuff

 Functional because it allows us to focus on changes in stimuli (on our  environment)

 Why don't eyes adapt to images in front of you, leaving you blind?  Eyes are constantly moving, even when you are taking in a single scene,  your eyes jump around over the scene

∙ Perceptual set

 A mental predisposition to perceive one thing and not another

 What you perceive is directly influenced by what you've been looking at or  thinking about previously

∙ Context effects

 In addition to perceptual set, context can radically alter perception (what is going  on around the stimuli)

 Cultural context ­ context instilled by culture also alters perception ∙ Emotions and motivation

 Alter perception

 Examples

 A hill looks steeper when you are wearing a heavy backpack

 Destinations seem farther when you are fatigued

 Baseballs look bigger when you're on a hitting streak

­ "Vision" Video ­

Vision 

∙ Stimulus input = light energy

∙ Physical characteristics of light

 Wavelength (hue/color)

 Intensity (brightness)

∙ Hue (color): the dimension of color determined by the wavelength of the light

 Wavelength: the distance from the peak of one wave to the peak of the next  Short wavelength = high frequency (bluish colors, high­pitched sounds)  Long wavelength = low frequency (reddish colors, low­pitched sounds)

 Short wavelengths (400 nm) <­­ violent ­­ indigo ­­ blue ­­ green ­­ yellow ­­  orange ­­ red ­­> (700 nm) long wavelengths 

 Different wavelengths of light result in different colors

∙ Intensity: amount of energy in a wave determined by the amplitude (height of  wavelengths)

 Related to perceived brightness

 As the intensity of a color, like blue, increases or decreases, the color  looks more "washed out" or "darkened"

 Great amplitude = bright colors, loud sounds

 Small amplitude = dull colors, soft sounds

The Eye 

∙ Parts of the eye

 Cornea: transparent tissue where light enters the eye

 Iris: muscle that expands and contracts to change the size of the opening (pupil)  for light

 Lens: focuses the light rays on the retina

 Transparent structure behind the pupil that changes shape to focus images  on the retina

 Accommodation: the process by which the eye's lens changes shape to  help focus near or far objects on the retina

 Retina: contains sensory receptors that process visual information and sends it to  the brain

 The light­sensitive inner surface of the eye, containing receptor rods and  cones in additional layers of other neurons (bipolar, ganglion cells) that process  visual information

 Steps

1. Light entering eye triggers photochemical reaction in rods and  cones at back of retina

2. Chemical reaction in turn activates bipolar cells

3. Bipolar cells then activate the ganglion cells, the axons of which  converge to form the optic nerve

 Optic nerve: carries neural impulses, transmitting information to the visual cortex (via the thalamus), from the eye to the brain

§ Blind spot: point where the optic nerve leaves the eye because  there are no receptor cells located there

 Fovea: central point in the retina around which the eye's cones cluster   Photoreceptors

 Cones

§ Number ­ 6 million

§ Center of the retina

§ Low sensitivity in dim light

§ Color and detail sensitive

 Rods

§ Number ­ 120 million

§ Periphery in retina

§ High sensitivity in dim light

§ No color or detail sensitivity

 Bipolar cells: receive messages from photoreceptors and transmit them to  ganglion cells, which converge to form the optic nerve

Visual information processing

 Optic nerves connect to the thalamus in the middle of the brain, and the thalamus  connects to the visual cortex

 Parallel processing: processing of several aspects of the stimulus simultaneously   The brain divides a visual scene into subdivisions such as color, depth,  form, movement, etc.

Feature detection

 Nerve cells in the visual cortex respond to specific features, such as edges, angles, and movement

 Supercell clusters

 Some individual cells are specifically designated to perceive angles and  forms, or also a specific gaze, posture, or body movement

 We also have clusters of supercells that integrate information and fire only when various pieces of information indicate the direction of attention and  approach of another person (e.g., goalies and strikers)

 Shape detection

 Specific combinations of temporal lobe activity occur as people look at  shoes, faces, chairs, and houses

­ "Perceptual Organization" Video ­

Note: how do we form meaningful perceptions from sensory information? ∙ We organize it

∙ Gestalt psychologists showed that a figure formed a "whole" different than its  surroundings

Perceptual Organization 

∙ Form perception (ex. figure and ground)

∙ After distinguishing the figure from the ground, our perceptions need to organize the  figure into a meaningful form using grouping rules

 The brain puts stuff together and fills in the gaps to create meaning ∙ Grouping rules

 Proximity

 Similarity

 Continuity

 Connectedness 

 Note: although grouping principles usually help us construct reality, they may  occasionally lead us astray

∙ Depth perception

 Enables us to judge distances

 Gibson and Walk (1960) suggested that human infants (crawling age) have depth  perception

 Even newborn animals show depth perception

 Ex. babies and visual cliffs

 Binocular cues

 Retinal disparity: images from the two eyes differ

 Monocular cues

 Relative size: if two objects are similar in size, we perceive the one that  casts a smaller retinal image to be farther away

 Interposition: objects that occlude (block) other objects tend to be  perceived as closer

 Relative height: we perceive objects that are higher in our field of vision  to be farther away than those that are lower

 Linear perspective: parallel lines, such as railroad tracks, appear to  converge in the distance

 The more the lines converge, the greater their perceived distance ∙ Motion perception

 Mostly perceive shrinking objects as retreating

 Enlarging objects as getting closer

 Large stuff looks like it moves more slowly than small stuff (despite same speed)  Stroboscopic effect: 24 still framers per second looks like motion (a motion  picture)

∙ Types of constancy

 Perceptual constancy: perceiving objects as unchanging even as illumination and  retinal images change

 Size­distance relationship

 Color constancy: perceiving familiar objects as having consistent color even when changing illumination filters the light reflected by the object

 Contextual cues help our brains interpret color based on light reflected  relative to objects that surround it

 Lightness constancy

 Shape constancy

∙ Perceptual interpretation

 Immanuel Kant (1724­1804) maintained that knowledge comes from our inborn  ways of organizing sensory experiences

 John Locke (1632­1704) argued that we learn to perceive the world through our  experiences

 How important is experience in shaping our perceptual interpretation? ∙ Critical periods

 After cataract surgery, blind adults were able to regain sight

 These individuals could differentiate figure and ground relationships, yet  they had difficulty distinguishing a circle and a triangle

 Adults with normal vision who developed cataracts and then had them removed  had no problem

 There is a critical period

 Once you've got the brain tissue dedicated to visual stimuli, it seems you  do not lose it, even if you late lose vision

∙ Perceptual adaptation: visual ability to adjust to an artificially displaced visual field (e.g.,  prism glasses)

­ "Sensation and Perception" Reading ­

Sensation: the physical processing of environmental stimuli by the sense organs ∙ During sensation, our sense organs are engaging in transduction: the conversion of one  form of energy into another

 Physical energy (ex. light, sound) is converted into a form the brain can  understand ­ electrical stimulation

Perception: the psychological process of interpreting sensory information

Absolute threshold: the smallest amount of stimulation needed for detection by a sense ∙ Measure by using signal detection: method for studying the ability to correctly identify  sensory stimuli

 Process involves presenting stimuli of varying intensities to a research participant  in order to determine the level at which he or she can reliably detect stimulation in a  given sense

Differential threshold: the smallest difference needed in order to differentiate two stimuli ∙ Also known as just noticeable difference (JND)

∙ Weber's law: states that just noticeable difference is proportional to the magnitude of the  initial stimulus

Bottom­up processing: building up to perceptual experience from individual pieces Top­down processing: experience influencing the perception of stimuli

Sensory adaptation: decrease in sensitivity of a receptor to a stimulus after constant stimulation

Vision 

∙ How it works

1. Light enters the eye through the pupil, a tiny opening behind the cornea 2. The pupil regulates the amount of light entering the eye by contracting (getting  smaller) in bright light and dilating (getting larger) in dimmer light

3. Once past the pupil, light passes through the lens, which focuses an image on a  thin layer of cells in the back of the eye, called the retina: cell layer in the back of the  eye containing photoreceptors

 Two main kinds of photoreceptors:

1. Rods: sensitive to low levels of light; located around the fovea 2. Cones: sensitive to color; located primarily in the fovea

1. Electrical signal is sent through a layer of cells in the retina, eventually traveling  down the optic nerve

2. After passing through the thalamus, this signal makes it to the primary visual  cortex: area of the cortex involved in processing visual stimuli

3. Information is then sent to a variety of different areas of the cortex for more  complex processing

 Some of these cortical regions are fairly specialized (ex. for processing  faces ­ fusiform face area) 

§ Damage to these areas of the cortex can potentially result in a  specific kind of agnosia: loss of the ability to perceive stimuli

 These specialized regions for visual recognition comprise the ventral  pathway: the "what" pathway

 Other areas involved in processing location and movement make up the  dorsal pathway: the "where" pathway

 Phenomena we often refer to as optical illusions provide misleading  information to these "higher" areas of visual processing

 Binocular disparity: difference is images processed by the left and right eyes  Binocular vision: our ability to perceive 3D and depth because of the difference  between the images on each of our retinas

Dark and light adaptation

 Rods are primarily involved in our ability to see in dim light  Dark adaptation: adjustment of eye to low levels of light

 Night vision ability takes around 10 minutes to turn on ­ our rods become  bleached in normal light conditions and require time to recover

 Light adaptation: adjustment of eye to high levels of light

 When we leave some place dark and head out into the light, a large  number of rods and cones are bleached at once, causing us to be blinded for a  few seconds

 Happens almost instantly compared with dark adaptation

Color vision

 Our cones allow us to see details in normal light conditions, as well as color  We have cones that respond preferentially, not exclusively, for red, green and  blue

 Trichromatic theory: theory proposing color vision as influenced by three  different cones responding preferentially to red, green and blue; dates back to  the early 19th century

§ Doesn't explain afterimage 

 Opponent­process theory: theory proposing color vision as influenced by cells  responsive to pairs of colors

 states that our cones send information to retinal ganglion cells that respond to pairs of colors

§ Red­green, blue­yellow, black­white

 These specialized cells take information from the cones and compute the  difference between the two colors—a process that explains why we cannot see  reddish­green or bluish­yellow, as well as why we see afterimages

 Color blindness can result from issues with the cones or retinal ganglion cells  involved in color vision

Hearing 

∙ Sound waves: changes in air pressure

 The physical stimulus for audition: ability to process auditory stimuli; also called  hearing

∙ The amplitude (or intensity) of a sound wave codes for the loudness of a stimulus  Higher amplitude sound waves result in louder sounds

∙ The pitch of a stimulus is coded in the frequency of a sound wave

 Higher frequency sounds are higher pitched

∙ Can gauge the quality, or timbre, of a sound by the complexity of the sound wave  Allows us to tell the difference between bright and dull sounds, as well as natural  and synthesized instruments

∙ In order to us to sense sound waves from our environment they must reach our inner ear  Sound waves are funneled by our pinna: outermost portion of the ear that you can  actually see

 Funneled into the auditory canal: tube running from the outer ear to the middle ear  Sound waves eventually the tympanic membrane: thin, stretched membrane in the middle ear that vibrates in response to sound; also called the eardrum

 Ossicles: a collection of three small bones in the middle ear (malleus ­  hammer, incus ­ anvil), stapes ­stirrup) that vibrate against the tympanic 

membrane

 Both the tympanic membrane and the ossicles amplify the sound waves before  they enter the fluid­filled cochlea: spiral bone structure in the inner ear containing  auditory hair cells: receptors in the cochlea that transduce sound into electrical  potentials

 Depending on age, humans can normally detect sounds between 20 Hz and 20 kHz

 After being processed by auditory hair cells, electrical signals are sent through the cochlear nerve (a division of the vestibulocochlear nerve) to the thalamus, and then  the primary auditory cortex: area of the cortex involved in processing auditory stimuli

∙ Because we have an ear on each side of our head, we are capable of localizing sound in  3D space pretty well

∙ Balance and the vestibular system

 Inner ear is also associated with our ability to balance and detect where we are in  space

 Vestibular system: parts of the inner ear involved in balance

 Comprised of three semicircular canals ­ fluid­filled bone structures  containing cells that respond to changes in the head's orientation in space

 Information from the vestibular system is sent through the vestibular nerve (the  other division of the vestibulocochlear nerve) to muscles involved in the movement of our eyes, neck, and other parts of our body

 This information allows us to maintain our gaze on an object while we are  in motion

 Disturbances in the vestibular system can result in issues with balance, including  vertigo

Touch 

∙ Somatosensation: ability to sense touch, pain and temperature

∙ Tactile sensation

 Those that are associated with texture ­ are transduced by special receptors in the  skin called mechanoreceptors: mechanical sensory receptors in the skin that response  to tactile stimulation

 After tactile stimuli are converted by mechanoreceptors, information is sent  through the thalamus to the primary somatosensory cortex: area of the cortex  involved in processing somatosensory stimuli

 This region of the cortex is organized in a somatotopic map: organization  of the primary somatosensory cortex maintaining a representation of the 

arrangement of the body

 Different regions are sized based on the sensitivity of specific pars  on the opposite side of the body

∙ Pain

 Nociception: our ability to sense pain

 The perception of pain is our body’s way of sending us a signal that something is  wrong and needs our attention

 Phantom limbs: the perception that a missing limb still exists

 Can involve phantom limb pain: pain in a limb that no longer exists  There is an interesting treatment for the alleviation of phantom limb pain  that works by tricking the brain ­ using a special mirror box to create a visual  representation of the missing limb

Smell and Taste 

∙ Chemical senses: our ability to process the environmental stimuli of smell and taste  Both olfaction (smell) and gustation (taste) require the transduction of chemical  stimuli into electrical potentials

 The receptors involved in our perception of both smell and taste bind directly with the stimuli they transduce

∙ Olfaction (smell)

 Odorants: chemicals transduced by olfactory receptors

 Bind with olfactory receptors found in the olfactory epithelium: organ  containing olfactory receptors

 Shape theory of olfaction: theory proposing that odorants of different size  and shape correspond to different smells

 Is not universally accepted, and alternative theories exist (ex. 

vibrations of odorant molecules correspond to their subjective smells)

 Regardless of how odorants bind with receptors, the result is a pattern of  neural activity

 Because olfactory receptors send projections to the brain through the cribriform  plate of the skull, head trauma has the potential to cause anosmia: loss of the ability to smell

∙ Gustation (taste)

 Taste receptor cells: receptors that transduce gustatory information  Taste buds are not the bumps on your tongue (papillae), but are located in  small divots around these bumps

 Receptors also respond to chemicals from the outside environment  (contained in the foods we eat)

 Tastants: chemicals transduced by taste receptor cells

 The binding of tastant chemicals with taste receptor cells result in our perception  of the five basic tastes:

 Sweet

 Sour

 Bitter

 Salty

 Umami (savory)

 All areas of the tongue with taste receptor cells are capable of responding to every taste

 During the process of eating, we are not limited to our sense of taste alone  While we are chewing, food odorants are forced back up to areas that  contain olfactory receptors

 This combination of taste and smell gives us the perception of flavor: the  combination of smell and taste

Multimodal perception: the effects that concurrent stimulation in more than one sensory modality has on the perception of events and objects in the world

∙ Superadditive effect of multisensory: the finding that responses to multimodal stimuli are  typically greater than the sum of the independent responses to each unimodal component if  it were presented on its own

∙ Principle of inverse effectiveness: the finding that, in general, for a multimodal stimulus,  if the response to each unimodal component (on its own) is weak, then the opportunity for  multisensory enhancement is very large

 However, if one component ­ by itself ­ is sufficient to evoke a strong response,  then the effect on the response gained by simultaneously processing the other  components of the stimulus will be relatively small

∙ Note: while there is simplicity in covering each sensory modality independently, we are  organisms that have evolved the ability to process multiple modalities as a unified  experience

­ "Conditioning," Video ­

Conditioning 

∙ Classical conditioning = pairing the uncontrolled stimulus with the controlled stimulus to  get the controlled response

 Before conditioning

1. Unconditioned stimulus [food] ­­> unconditioned response [salivation] 2. Neutral stimulus [sound] ­­> no conditioned response [salivation]  During conditioning

1. Sound + food ­­> unconditioned response [salivation]

2. Conditioned stimulus [sound] ­­> conditioned response [salivation]  Note: we are all classically conditioned

 Big names in classical conditioning

§ Ivan Pavlov

§ Jon Watson

Operant conditioning = the pattern of reinforcement facilitates behavior

 Learning by association ­ learning is about how my behavior can produce  consequences that I enjoy or do not enjoy

 B.F. Skinner built on Thorndike's Law of Effect

§ Law of Effect: says that behavior that produces satisfying effect in a  situation are more likely to occur again in that situation; whereas behaviors that  that produce a "discomforting effect" in a situation are less likely to re­occur § We repeat what is rewarding, and tend to not repeat what isn't 

 Skinner box: a box in which a rat can push a lever to get food

§ Rat learns to push the lever to get food

§ You can teach the rat to push the lever only when the light comes on, or  you can mess with how often the rat has to push the lever in order to get the  food

§ Electric grid on the bottom so that the rat can also be punished for pushing the lever at the wrong time

§ Box has lights and speaker so that you can use reinforcement or  punishment to get the rat to respond to light and sound cues Basic idea ­ rats,  like humans, learn quickly what behaviors get them what they want

§ Note: Skinner and his followers did many experiments showing how  behavior can be shaped, when reinforcement is most effective, etc.

 Big names in operant conditioning

§ Edward Thorndike

§ B.F. Skinner

Reinforcement

 Reinforces

§ Anything likely to increase a behavior

§ Positive reinforcers = something given (e.g., treat)

§ Negative reinforcers = something taken away (e.g., headache)  Punishers

§ Anything likely to decrease the behavior

§ Positive punishers = something given (e.g., extra chores)

§ Negative punishers = something taken away (e.g., video games)  Note: negative reinforcement is not punishment

§ The key difference between positive and negative is whether something  was presented (positive) or removed (negative)

§ Other key is whether the consequence is designed to increase (reward) or  decrease (punish) the behavior

Classical versus operant conditioning

 Classical conditioning

§ We associate a stimulus with an event

§ A response is elicited by a stimulus

§ The sequence is mostly voluntary

 Operant conditioning 

§ We associate a behavior with an event

§ A response is emitted

§ The sequence is voluntary 

Reinforcement schedules: refers to the frequency to which a behavior is reinforced  Depending on the reinforcement schedule, the future desired or undesired  behavior will be affected

 Extinction: refers to the behavior stopping after the reinforcement stops § Because learning was so rapid, extinction is also very useful  Spontaneous recovery: refers to the reappearance of the behavior after extinction  but not due to reinforcement

 Continuous reinforcement: refers to a schedule of reinforcing the behavior every  single time it occurs

§ Very useful for learning new behaviors

 Partial (intermittent) reinforcement: refers to a schedule of reinforcing the  behavior occasionally and not reinforcing the behavior other times; learning takes  longer

§ Highly resistant to extinction because of the unpredictability of when the  reward will come (ex. gambling)

§ Variable­ratio results in a high rate of responding

§ Behavior is reinforced after unpredictable number of responses  § Hard to extinguish

Applications in real life

 Personal context

 Professional context

 Clinical settings

§ Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA)

 Become aware of the pattern of reinforcement I give to others

Intrinsic motivation

 Beware of over­reinforcing that undermines intrinsic motivation

 Smiling, happiness, positive social interactions = huge rewards

­ "Social Learning Theory," Video ­

Social Learning Theory 

∙ Al Bandura

 Did not believe that learning is limited to what we've personally experienced by  classical, or even operant, conditioning

 Said that we can learn not only from our own experiences, but by observing the  experiences of others

 Social cognitive learning theory

∙ Social cognitive learning theory

 Observational learning: learning that occurs by watching and imitating others; no  direct experience needed

 Modeling: an individual provides an example for us to follow; something to  imitate

 Imitation

 We imitate both pro­social and anti­social models

 Children and adults are prone to imitate the behaviors (and attitudes) of  people around them

 Vicarious reinforcement or punishment

 We experience probably via mirror neurons

 Mirror neurons

 Presence means that we construct internal mental images (mirrors) of  actions that we observe in others

 Fire in the brain when we watch others doing something that we are  capable of doing

 Motor and sensory neurons do not fire, but other neurons 

associated with that action do

 Appears to be the biological basis for both imitation and for 

empathy

 Empathy and mental images may be about neural networks, rather than  mirror neurons (the debate continues…) 

 Contagion

 Our brains let us vicariously experience the emotions of others

 We can do this by observation, or even by reading accounts of others'  experiences

 We naturally mirror the emotions in others

 We imitate others' experiences in our brains (MRI scans), faces, and  bodies

∙ Violence and media

 Children spend more time watching TV than in school (in developed countries;  including the US)

 Teens average 4 hours a day (365 days a year) of use

 Adults average 3 hours a day (365 days a year) of use

 When TV was introduced in the US, and in South Africa, homicide rates doubled  Watching violence breeds intolerance and aggression

 In a study of over 400 elementary school children, aggression increases in  those heavily exposed to violent TV, videos, and video games, after controlling  for existing differences in hostility and aggression

 Experimental data: show attractive people committing justified, realistic violence  that goes unpunished and causes no visible harm or pain ­­> viewers respond with  more cruelty to other

 Imitation of anti­social acts desensitization to violence and cruelty  Watching murder may not make you a murderer; but think about the  exposure for those who are mentally ill/unstable

 The shape of our fantasies/dreams have changed

 We are putting violence in our subconscious library of alternative  responses

 You literally watch an avatar of yourself drive aggressively, engage in fist  fights, steal, kill, assassinate, and stab, other characters, and you get rewarded  for doing it

 The video game gives you a reward. You get a dopamine hit in your brain  for completing a task, for meeting a goal

­ "Cognitive and Learning," Reading ­

Two Types of Conditioning 

1. Classical conditioning: the procedure in which an initially neutral stimulus (the  conditioned stimulus, or CS) is paired with an unconditioned stimulus (or US)  The result is that the conditioned stimulus begins to elicit a conditioned response  (CR)

 Nowadays considered important as both a behavioral phenomenon and as a  method to study simple associative learning

 Same as Pavlovian conditioning

 Dog + bell + salivation experiment

 Straightforward test of associative learning that can be used to study other, more  complex behaviors

 Always occurring in our lives

 Unconditioned response (UR): an innate response that is elicited by a stimulus  before (or in the absence of) conditioning

 Unconditioned stimulus (US): stimulus that elicits the response before  conditioning occurs

 Conditioned response (CR): response that is elicited by the conditioned stimulus  after classical conditioning has taken place

 Conditioned stimulus (CS): an initially neutral stimulus (like a bell, light, or tone)  that elicits a conditioned response after it has been associated with an unconditioned  stimulus

 Animal behaves as if it has learned to associate a stimulus with a significant event  Response is elicited by a stimulus that comes before it

2. Instrumental conditioning: process in which animals learn about the relationship between  their behaviors and their consequences

 Also known as operant conditioning

 Occurs when a behavior (as opposed to a stimulus) is associated with the  occurrence of a significant event

 First studied by Edward Thorndike, and later extended by B.F. Skinner  Rat and Skinner box experiment

 Studies how the effects of a behavior influence the probability that it will occur  again

 Law of Effect: he idea that instrumental or operant responses are  influenced by their effects (Thorndike)

 Responses that are followed by a pleasant state of affairs will be  strengthened and those that are followed by discomfort will be weakened

 Provides a method for studying how consequences influence “voluntary” behavior  One of the lessons of operant conditioning research ­ voluntary behavior is strongly influenced by its consequences

 Operant: a behavior that is controlled by its consequences

 Simplest example is the rat's lever­pressing, which is controlled by the  presentation of the reinforcer

 Reinforcer: any consequence of a behavior that strengthens the behavior or  increases the likelihood that it will be performed it again

 Punisher: a stimulus that decreases the strength of an operant behavior when it is  made a consequence of the behavior

 Animal behaves as if it has learned to associate a behavior with a significant event  Response is not elicited by any particular stimulus

Useful Things to Know 

∙ Classical conditioning

 Has many effects on behavior

 Taste aversion learning: the phenomenon in which a taste is paired with  sickness, and this causes the organism to reject ­ and dislike ­ that taste in the  future

 Occurs with a variety of significant events

 Fear conditioning: a type of classical or Pavlovian conditioning in which  the conditioned stimulus (CS) is associated with an aversive unconditioned  stimulus (US), such as a foot shock. 

 As a consequence of learning, the CS comes to evoke fear

 The phenomenon is thought to be involved in the development of  anxiety disorders in humans

 Conditioned compensatory response: conditioned response that opposes,  rather than is the same as, the unconditioned response

 Functions to reduce the strength of the unconditioned response  Often seen in conditioning when drugs are used as unconditioned  stimuli

 Classical cues motivate ongoing operant behavior

 The learning process

 Studies show that pairing a controlled stimulus with an uncontrolled  stimulus together is not sufficient for an association to be learned between them  Blocking: the finding that no conditioning occurs to a stimulus if it  is combined with a previously conditioned stimulus during conditioning  trials

 Suggests that surprise value, or prediction error is 

important in conditioning

 Prediction error: when the outcome of a conditioning trial is  different from that which is predicted by the conditioned stimuli that are  present on the trial (i.e., when the US is surprising)

 Necessary to create Pavlovian conditioning (and associative learning generally)

 Tends to take in the most valid predictors of significant events and ignore  the less useful ones

 Classical conditioning is strongest if the conditioned stimulus and  unconditioned stimulus are intense of salient

 It is also best if the CS and US are relatively new and the organism hasn’t been frequently exposed to them before

 It is especially strong if the organism’s biology has prepared it to  associate a particular CS and US

 Preparedness: he idea that an organism’s evolutionary  history can make it easy to learn a particular association (ex. 

associating a particular food, instead of its surrounding environment, with illness)

 Erasing classical learning

 After conditioning, the response to the CS can be eliminated if the CS is  presented repeatedly without the US

 Extinction: decrease in the strength of a learned behavior that  occurs when the conditioned stimulus is presented without the 

unconditioned stimulus (in classical conditioning) or when the behavior is  no longer reinforced (in instrumental conditioning)

 Behaviors that have been reduced in strength through 

extinction are said to be "extinguished"

 Does not necessarily destroy the original learning 

(spontaneous recovery)

 Spontaneous recovery: recovery of an extinguished response that occurs  with the passage of time after extinction

 Can occur after extinction in either classical or instrumental  conditioning

 Renewal effect: recovery of an extinguished response that occurs when the context is changed after extinction

 Especially strong when the change of context involves return to the context in which conditioning originally occurred

 Can occur after extinction in either classical or instrumental  conditioning

 These effects have been interpreted to suggest that extinction  inhibits rather than erases the learned behavior, and this inhibition is 

mainly expressed in the context in which it is learned

 Context: stimuli that are in the background whenever learning  occurs

 Can also be provided by internal stimuli, such as the 

sensory effects of drug and mood states

 Can also be provided by a specific period in time ­ the 

passage of time is said to change the "temporal context" 

∙ Instrumental conditioning

 Instrumental responses come under stimulus control

 Stimulus control: when an operant behavior is controlled by a stimulus  that precedes it

 Discriminative stimulus: a stimulus that signals whether the response will  be reinforced

 Usually does not elicit the response the way a classical conditioned stimulus does

 Said to "set the occasion/stage for" the operant response

 Stimulus­control techniques are widely used in the laboratory to study  perception and other psychological processes in animals

 These methods can also be used to study "higher" cognitive processes  Categorize: to sort or arrange different items into classes or 

categories

 Operant conditioning involves choice

 The tendency to perform a particular action depends on both the  reinforcers earned for it and the reinforcers earned for its alternatives

 Quantitative law of effect: a mathematical rule that states that the  effectiveness of a reinforcer at strengthening an operant response depends on  the amount of reinforcement earned for all alternative behaviors

 A reinforcer is less effective if there is a lot of reinforcement in the environment for other behaviors

 Cognition in instrumental learning

 Animals learn about the specific consequences of each behavior, and will  perform a behavior depending on how much they currently want—or “value”— its consequence

 Reinforcer devaluation effect: the finding that an animal will stop  performing an instrumental response that once led to a reinforcer if the 

reinforcer is separately made aversive or undesirable

 Behavior is said to be goal­directed: instrumental behavior that is  influenced by the animal’s knowledge of the association between the behavior  and its consequence and the current value of the consequence

 Sensitive to the reinforcer devaluation effect

 Habit: instrumental behavior that occurs automatically in the presence of a stimulus and is no longer influenced by the animal’s knowledge of the value of  the reinforcer

 Insensitive to the reinforcer devaluation effect

Note: classical and operant conditioning are usually studied separately, but outside of the  laboratory they almost always occur at the same time

Observational learning: learning by observing the behavior of others

∙ Component of Albert Bandura's Social Learning Theory: the theory that people can learn  new responses and behaviors by observing the behavior of others

 Bobo doll experiment

∙ Observational learning does not necessarily require reinforcement, but instead hinges on  the presence of others

 Social models: authorities that are the targets for observation and who model  behaviors

∙ Bandura theorizes that the observational learning process consists of 4 parts:  Attention ­ one must pay attention to what they are observing in order to learn  Retention ­ to learn one must be able to retain the behavior s/he is observing in  memory

 Initiation ­ the learned must be able to execute (or initiate) the learned behavior  Motivation ­ observer must possess the motivation to engage in observational  learning

∙ Vicarious reinforcement: learning that occurs by observing the reinforcement or  punishment of another person

­­­

PSY 1010 – Exam II Study Guide

Definitions Key Concepts 

­ "Consciousness" Video ­

Consciousness: our awareness of ourselves and our environment

∙ Different states of consciousness

 Occur spontaneously ­ daydreaming, drowsiness, dreaming

 Physiologically induced ­ hallucinations, orgasm, food, oxygen, starvation  Psychologically induced ­ sensory deprivation, hypnosis, meditation

Note: the mind and the brain are not the same thing

∙ The mind arises from the brain, but is not reducible to biology

∙ The brain creates and controls the mind

∙ Our mental states can influence our physical states

Dual Processing 

∙ Our minds simultaneously operate in two ways

1. Unconscious ­ implicit

 We intuitively make use of information we are not consciously aware of 2. Conscious ­ explicit

 We process only a small part of all that we experience

∙ Not the same thing as multi­tasking

§ In multi­tasking, you are consciously switching attention between tasks § There is a delay when switching attention to complex tasks (don't text and drive)

Note: we can only consciously process a fraction of all the bits of information we can perceive at any moment

∙ Selective attention

∙ Cocktail party effect: your ability to attend to only one voice among many, and you can  hear someone say your name in a nearby conversation

∙ Non­conscious processing

Inattentional blindness: failing to perceive visible objects when our attention is directed  elsewhere

∙ Daniel Simons is famous for researching and showing people failures of attention Change blindness: failing to notice a change in the environment

Split Consciousness in Vision 

∙ Visual perception track ­ recognizes the world

∙ Visual action track ­ guides actions

∙ Blindsight ­ no conscious awareness of obstacles

 People who are perceptually blind in a certain area of their visual field  demonstrate some responses to visual stimuli; caused by injury to the occipital lobe  They may avoid an obstacle they cannot "see"

 Can predict location or type of movement of a stimulus in a forced­choice  test

­ "Sleep" Video ­

Biological Rhythms and Sleep 

∙ Circadian rhythms occur on a 24­hour cycle and include sleep and wakefulness  Body temperature begins to rise in the morning, peaks during the day, then falls at night

 Light triggers the suprachiasmatic nuclease to decrease (morning) melatonin from the pineal gland in the morning, when there is more light, and increase (evening) it at  nightfall, when light is decreasing

 Suprachiasmatic nucleus is in the hypothalamus

 Artificial light messes with your circadian rhythm 

∙ Circadian rhythms are slightly different for different ages

 Older people tend to be more alert in the morning

 Younger people tend to be more alert at night

 This shift begins around age 20

∙ Thinking is sharpest and memory most accurate when we are at our daily peak ∙ Adolescence and sleep

 Teenagers experience delayed sleep preference

 Their melatonin levels typically rise a couple of hours after the rest of ours do  Left to their own devices, teens would stay up longer and sleep in longer  School districts who have changed their schedules to accommodate this delay  find:

 Significant increases in test scores and performance

 Decreases in tardiness and missed school days

 Decreases in behavioral problems

 Decreases in traffic accidents involving teen drivers

∙ Sleep stages

 American Academy of Sleep Medicine classifications

 Phases of sleep

 NREM1 ­ lightest sleep

 NREM2 

 NREM3 ­ deepest sleep

 REM ­ phase during which dreaming, and rapid eye movement occurs  As the night wears on, NREM­3 shortens, and disappears

 REM and NREM­2 phases get longer ­ these are phases during which we  think learning and neural connections are strengthened

 NREM­3 is when night terrors, sleep­walking, and bedwetting are most likely to  occur

 Also the phase in which you are most difficult to awaken

 Sleep cycles about every 90 minutes

 Sleep cycles more quickly for older adults, and they experience less of the  deep, NREM­3 sleep

 With each cycle, NREM­3 sleep decreases, and REM sleep increases  You will have more than 100,000 dreams over a typical lifetime

∙ Brain waves

 REM waves

 NREM­1 waves are also called alpha waves

 NREM­2 waves are theta waves

 NREM­3 waves are delta waves; they are slower and bigger

∙ Theories about whey we sleep

 Protects ­ kept our ancestors out of harm's way at night

 Helps us recover ­ restores and repairs brain tissue

 Helps us remember ­ restores and builds fading memories

 Boosts creative thinking ­ ponder a problem just before bed, sleep on it  Supports growth ­ newborn babies need a lot of sleep

 During sleep, the pituitary gland releases growth hormones

∙ Sleep deprivation

 Suppressed immune system

 7 hours or less = 3x more likely than those who got 8 hours or more to  succumb to a cold virus

 Increased irritability ­ poor emotional regulation

 Worse decision making, memory, and reaction time

 Cardiac problems ­ increases inflammation and arthritis

 Overeating, weight gain, obesity

 Poor concentration

 Increased risk of accidents

 Increased risk of depression

 Undermines goals

∙ Learning and sleep

 Sleep helps you consolidate and recall what you learned the day before  You will be more successful if you study and then sleep rather than stay up all  night cramming

 What you study or do in the 5 minutes before you fall asleep is usually forgotten  You can learn basic associations in your sleep (sound with a smell, for instance)  You can't learn a 2nd language, calculus, or other material by playing an audio  recording while you sleep

∙ Sleep disorders

 Insomnia: trouble falling and staying asleep

 1 in 10 people have it (1 in 4 older adults)

 Narcolepsy: sudden bouts of sleepiness, at inopportune times (even when excited)  People fall asleep for 5 minutes or less, usually triggered by strong  emotions (anger, happiness, sex)

 1 in 2,000 people have it

 Sleep apnea: oxygen starved; wake up repeatedly during the night, but are  unaware of the awakenings

 Leaves us sleepy, grumpy, irritable

 Risk factors include being male, overweight

 Snoring, exhaustion are signs of this

 1 in 20 people have it

 Night terrors: distinct from nightmares; happen early in the night (first few hours  of sleep, during NREM­3), mostly in children; appear terrified and awake, but don't  recall it the next day

 Sleep­walking and sleep­talking

 Walking

 Usually occurs in NREM­3 sleep

 Sleep deprivation can increase the likelihood

 Talking

 Can occur in any sleep phase

 Few recall it the next day

 Runs in families (genetic component)

 Developmentally normal (20% walk, 5% repeatedly walk)

 Fades as you age

∙ Natural sleep aids

 Exercise regularly but not in the late evening (late afternoon is best)  Avoid caffeine after early afternoon

 Avoid food and drink near bedtime ­ exception would be a glass of milk  Relax before bedtime, using dimmer light

 Sleep on a regular schedule and avoid long naps

 Hide the time so you aren't tempted to check repeatedly

 Reassure yourself that temporary sleep loss causes no great harm  Focus your mind on nonarousing, engaging thoughts

 If all else fails, settle for less sleep (either going to bed later or getting up earlier) ∙ Dreaming

 Interrupting sleep when dreamers are hitting REM sleep, and memory for newly  learned tasks is worse the next day

 Although memory consolidation may also happen in other phases  Deprive people of REM sleep, and they experience REM rebound: spending much more time than usual in REM sleep when they are finally allowed to sleep unimpaired ∙ Function of dreams

 Freud ­ unconscious wish fulfillment

 Neo­Freudians ­ way for the unconscious to communicate with the conscious  mind

 Information processing theory ­ a way for the mind to sift, sort, and process the  day's activities

 Physiologically ­ dreams stimulate neural pathways

 May function to develop and preserve them

 Cognitive development theory ­ dreaming may aid brain maturation and cognitive development

 Activation­synthesis theory ­ dreams are the brain's attempt to make sense of  random neural activity

­ "Drugs and Consciousness" Video ­

Dependence and Addiction 

∙ Continued use of a psychoactive drug produces tolerance

 With repeated exposure to a drug, the drug's effect lessens

 It takes greater quantities to get the desired effect

∙ Neuroadaptation: brain chemistry adapts to offset the effect of the drug ∙ Addiction: a craving for a chemical substance, despite its adverse consequences (physical and psychological)

∙ Withdrawal: upon stopping use of a drug (after addiction), users may experience the  undesirable effects of withdrawal

∙ Dependence: absence of a drug may lead to a feeling of physical pain, intense cravings  (physical dependence), and negative emotions (psychological dependence) ∙ Misconceptions about addiction

 Addictive drugs quickly corrupt ­ some take a long time

 Addiction cannot be overcome voluntarily ­ many smokers and other addicts quit  on their own

 Addiction is no different than repetitive pleasure­seeking behaviors ­ we use the  term as a metaphor, but a true addiction is both compulsive and dysfunctional ∙ Psychoactive drug: a chemical substance that alters perceptions and mood (affects  consciousness)

 Divided into three groups

1. Depressants: drugs that reduce neural activity and slow body functions  Alcohol ­ affects motor skills, judgment, and memory, and 

increases aggressiveness while reducing self awareness and self­control;  slows nervous system (which includes brain)

 Lowers inhibitions (up to 80% of sexual assaults on college

campuses involve alcohol)

 Can cause blackouts

 Suppresses REM sleep

 Binge drinking during adolescence may be especially 

harmful (changes structure of the brain)

 Alcohol use disorder puts you at risk for lung, brain, and 

liver damage

 Girls and young women become addicted to alcohol more 

quickly because they have less stomach enzymes that digest alcohol

 Barbiturates: drugs that depress the activity of the central nervous  system, reducing anxiety but impairing memory and judgement

 Tranquilizers 

 Nembutal, Seconal, and Amytal are some (often 

prescribed) examples

 Can be lethal when combined with alcohol

 Opiates: depress neural activity, temporarily lessening pain and  anxiety

 Opium, morphine, heroin

 Highly addictive

 Includes narcotics (codeine, morphine, methadone are  prescription forms)

2. Stimulants: drugs that excite neural activity and speed up body functions  Caffeine and nicotine ­ increase heart and breathing rates and other autonomic functions to provide energy

 Cocaine ­ induces immediate euphoria followed by a crash  Crack (form of cocaine that can be smoked), other forms  may be sniffed or injected

 May lead to increased aggression, emotional disturbance,  suspiciousness, convulsions, cardiac arrest, respiratory failure

 Ecstasy (or Methylenedioxymethamphetamine or MDMA) ­ mild  hallucinogen

 Produces a euphoric high but over time can damage  serotonin­producing neurons, which results in a permanent deflation  of mood and impairment of memory

 Meth ­ triggers the release of dopamine, which affects mood and  energy levels

 Over time can reduce the baseline dopamine levels, leaving the use with permanently depressed functioning

 Irritability, insomnia, hypertension, seizures, depression,  social isolation, occasional violent outbursts

 Amphetamines, methamphetamines

3. Hallucinogens: psychedelic (mind­manifesting) drugs that distort  perceptions and evoke sensory images in the absence of sensory input  LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide) ­ powerful hallucinogenic drug  that is also known as acid

 MDMA (Ecstasy)

 THC (delta­9­tetrahydrocannabinol) ­ the major active ingredient  in marijuana that triggers a variety of effects, including mild 

hallucinations

 Marijuana

 Mild hallucinogen, amplifies sensitivity to sounds, tastes,  colors, and smells

 Relaxes, disinhibits, may produce euphoria

 May impair motor coordination, perception, and reaction  time

 Lingers in the body

 Repeated use, especially in adolescence, increases the risk 

of addiction

 Teens who use marijuana are at a higher risk for anxiety 

and depression

 Heavy users (20 years) linked to shrinkage of memory and 

emotional centers in the brain, IQ may also suffer

 Marijuana smoke is toxic, and can cause lung damage, 

cancer, and complications in pregnancy

­ "States of Consciousness" Reading ­

Consciousness: the awareness or deliberate perception of a stimulus

∙ Meant to indicate awareness

Levels of Awareness 

∙ Low awareness

 Cue: a stimulus that has a particular significance to the perceive (e.g., a sight or  sound that has special relevance to the person who saw or heard it)

 Priming: the activation of certain thoughts or feelings that make them easier to  think of and act upon

 Implicit associations test (IAT): a computer reaction time test that measures a  person's automatic associations with concepts

 Very difficult test to fake because it records automatic reactions that occur in milliseconds

 Cost ­ influenced by subtle factors

 Benefit ­ saves mental effort

∙ High awareness

 Includes effortful attention and careful decision making

 Mindfulness: a state of heightened focus on the thoughts passing through one's  head, as well as a more controlled evaluation of those thoughts 

 Research has shown that when you engage in more deliberate consideration, you  are less persuaded by irrelevant yet biasing influences

 Associated with recognizing when you're using a stereotype, rather than fairly  evaluating another person

 Flexible Correction Model: the ability for people to correct or change their beliefs and evaluations if they believe these judgments have been biased 

 Cost ­ uses mental effort

 Benefit ­ can overcome some biases

∙ Note: humans alternate between low and high thinking states

 We have neural networks for both

Other States of Awareness 

∙ Hypnosis: the state of consciousness whereby a person is highly responsive to the  suggestions of another

 An actual, document phenomenon

 Usually involves a dissociation with one's environment and an intense focus on a  single stimulus, which is usually accompanied by a sense of relaxation

 Dissociation: the heightened focus on one stimulus or thought such that  many other things around you are ignored; a disconnect between one's 

awareness of their environment and the one object the person is focusing on  As a consequence of dissociation, a person is less effortful, and less self conscious in consideration of his or her own thoughts and behaviors

 Franz Mesmer is often credited as among the first people to "discover" hypnosis,  which he used to treat members of elite society who were experiencing psychological  distress

 To be hypnotized, you must first want to be hypnotized (i.e., you can't be  hypnotized against your will)

 Once you are hypnotized, you won't do anything you wouldn't also do  while in a more natural state of consciousness

 Hypnotherapy: the use of hypnotic techniques such as relaxation and suggestion  to help engineer desirable change such as lower pain or quitting smoking  Still used in a variety of formats

 Modern hypnotherapy often uses a combination of relaxation, suggestion,  motivation, and expectancies to create a desired mental or behavioral state  Trance states: a state of consciousness characterized by the experience of "out­of body possession," or an acute dissociation between one's self and the current, physical environment surrounding them

 People in this state are said to have less voluntary control over their  behaviors and actions

 Often occur in religious ceremonies, where the person believes he or she is "possessed" by an otherworldly being or force

 The body of research investigating this phenomenon tends to reject the  claim that these experiences constitute an "altered state of consciousness" ∙ Sleep 

 Unique state of consciousness ­ lacks full awareness but the brain is still active  Melatonin: a hormone associated with increased drowsiness and sleep  Circadian rhythm: the physiological sleep­wake cycle

 Influenced by exposure to sunlight as well as daily schedule and activity  Biologically, it includes changes in body temperature, blood pressure and  blood sugar

 Jet lag: the state of being fatigued and/or having difficulty adjusting to a  new time zone after traveling a long distance

 Stages

 NREM­1: ­ falling asleep stage marked by theta waves 

 NREM­2 ­ considered light sleep; occasional high intensity brain waves;  makes up about 55% of all sleep

 NREM­3 ­ marked by greater muscle relaxation and the appearance of  delta waves; makes up between 20­25% of all sleep

 REM ­ marked by rapid eye movement; similar to wakefulness in terms of brain activity; accounts for 20% of all sleep; associated with dreaming

 Dreams

 All humans dream

 We dream at every stage, but dreams during REM sleep are especially  vivid

∙ Psychoactive drugs

 Hallucinogens: substances that, when ingested, alter a person's perceptions, often  by creating hallucinations that are not real or distorting their perceptions of time  Marijuana, LSD, MDMA, etc.

 Euphoria: an intense feeling of pleasure, excitement or happiness  Depressants: a class of drugs that slow down the body's physiological and mental  processes

 Alcohol is the most widely used depressant

 Blood alcohol content (BAC): a measure of the percentage of alcohol  found in a person's blood

 Measure is typically the standard used to determine the extent to  which a person is intoxicated

 At .3 ­ .4%, there is a serious risk of death

 Opiates: stimulate endorphin production in the brain; often used as pain  killers by medical professionals

 Highly addictive

 Stimulants: a class of drugs that speed up the body's physiological and mental  processes

 Caffeine ­ the drug found in coffee and tea

 Nicotine ­ the active drug in cigarettes and other tobacco products

­ "Cognitive Development I ­ Children's Brains" Video ­

Cognitive Development 

∙ How does the brain change during infancy and childhood?

 Synaptogenesis: the production of new synapses or connections

 Happens fastest during infancy

 Young children have several times the number of synaptic connections  that adults do

 Synaptic pruning: unused or unnecessary connections are pruned away, or lost  Follows synaptogenesis

 Period of synaptogenesis and synaptic pruning are also seen during  puberty

 Synaptogenesis and pruning happen throughout life, but the biggest, most  explosive period is in early childhood

 Myelination: the process of covering neural axons with fatty tissue  Speeds neural communication markedly

 Different parts of the brain are myelinating at different times

 Sensory cortex happens during the first year

 Motor cortex happens during the second year

 Higher brain areas, association areas, are myelinating into 

adulthood

 Sometimes you can see how slow young children are to react

 They fall down, but don't instantly cry

 Experience

 Can account for 10­20% of differences in myelination

 Give your child experience ­ move, explore, experiment, talk to them, play with them, encourage them, etc.

∙ Experience matters

 Experience­expectant process

 Species come pre­wired to interpret their environments

 If the environment is species­typical, then development proceeds  "normally" across individual members

 Ex. we are pre­wired to learn language, but we need the 

environmental input in order to develop language

 Experience­dependent process

 Some experiences are not species ­typical

 Exposure to these experiences will create individual differences in  brain structure (and function)

 Ex. learning to play an instrument (an experience that only some  children get ­ it changes neural connections)

∙ Abuse and neglect

 Chronic abuse and neglect leave changes in brain functioning

 Abused children are more reactive to hearing angry speech

 They detect signs of anger in faces faster than non­abused children  Changes in serotonin functioning may pre­dispose them to be aggressive  They are at increased risk for substance abuse disorder; depression and  anxiety with particular gene alleles

 "It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men," ­ Frederick  Douglass

∙ Comparing adult and child brains

 Synaptic plasticity is greatest in infancy

 When unused neurons die, we lost potential connections

 With age, ability to form new synapses decreases, but it is still there  Degree to which experience can change the brain

 Intensity (or repetition) of the experience needed to produce  change also increases

 Flexibility 

 Plasticity ensures that we can continue to adapt to different environments  over time (infant environment doesn't have to be the same as adult environment)  We are inefficient thinkers and processers as infants ­ takes more effort,  slower, and less complex

 Specialization and efficiency

 (Commitment) of neurons to a specific activity decreases plasticity, but  increases efficiency 

 Babies' brains are more flexible, but less efficient than adults'

 Ex. face recognition of lemurs

 Babies can recognize lemurs by their faces, adults can't ­ babies  lose this ability sometime around the end of the first year

∙ Children's minds vs. adult minds

 We no longer assume that children's brains are just immature versions of adult  brains

 Critical question ­ how are children's brains specifically adapted to the child's (not the adult's) environment?

 Early learning

 When exposure to stimuli is species­atypical, patterns of development are  affected (there are both gains and losses)

 In many cases, starting training too early looks like it actually delays  learning and harms performance (animal models)

 Ex. baby monkeys who are trained too early can begin to do a task, but they do not master it as quickly as baby monkeys that are trained on 

that same task when they are a few months older

 Children are less motivated and less interested in tasks than those  who are trained when they are older

 Chronotopic constraints on brain development

 The way early developing regions process information "filters" or  constrains the ways in which later developing regions can process information

­ "Cognitive Development II ­ Children's Minds" Video ­

Jean Piaget (1986­1980) 

∙ Swiss epistemologist

 Studied how we acquire knowledge

∙ Developed the most comprehensive and influential theory of children's cognitive  development

∙ Development of children's minds

 We develop by trying to makes sense of our experiences

 We build conceptual schemas

 We assimilate new information into existing schemas

 We accommodate schemas (adjust them, build new ones) when new information  doesn't fit

∙ Four stages of cognitive development

 Sensorimotor stage (birth­2 years)

 Understands world/learn through senses and "motor" operations  (movements)

 Explore the world with fingers, mouth, etc.

 Object permanence (at about 6 months)

 Violation of expectation procedures and math, physics, etc.

 Pre­operational stage (2­7 years)

 Magical thinking

 Ego­centrism

 Cannot conserve or reverse operations

 Development of symbolic thought, language, and pretend play

 Understands the world through language and mental images

 Theory of mind

 Concrete operational stage (7­12 years)

 Understands the world through logical thinking and categories

 Kids can think logically, but not hypothetically

 Children know that if you cut a sandwich in half, you still has as  much sandwich as a whole

 Can mentally reverse operations in a way that younger children can't  Can concentrate on more than one dimension

 They know that a (1) shorter and (2) wider container can hold as  much liquid as a (1) taller and (2) thinner one

 They can do conservation (decentration, reversibility)

 Kids can do seriations: order items along a continuum

 Can also do this mentally with transitive inference (if A is bigger  than B, and B is bigger than C, which is bigger, A or C?)

 Spatial reasoning improves (map drawing, direction giving, mentally  rotating for perspective, etc.)

 Formal operational (12+ years)

 Understands world through hypothetical thinking and scientific reasoning  Abstract thinking, including higher moral reasoning

 Hypothetic­deductive reasoning

 Given a problem, can isolate variables to solve

 Can deduce specific applications, given a general rule

 Can inductively reason 

Lev Vygotsky  

∙ Born in 1896, contemporary of Piaget's 

∙ Russian born during the Soviet era

 World didn't discover him until the late 1900s

∙ Died young in 1934

∙ Socio­cultural developmental theory

 Children's thinking abilities develop through a process of being scaffolded by  parents (and others)

 Everything is learned first on the social plane (between parent and child), and then on the psychological plane (internal)

 Importance of speech

 Mom directs through speech

 Later the child directs himself through speech

 Then speech goes internal ­ you have thinking

­ "Cognitive Development III ­ Children's Social Development" Video ­ John Bowlby, M.D. 

∙ British psychoanalyst

∙ Said that children have an innate propensity to seek and maintain proximity to their  caregiver to ensure survival

 This is the attachment bond ­ goes one way (child ­­> parent)

∙ Attachment theory ­ says that a child's relationship with their primary caregiver is the  template, or foundation, on which social understanding, development, and close  relationships are built

 Attachment: an enduring emotional bond, characterized by the tendency to seek  and maintain proximity to a specific person, particularly under stress

∙ Quality of attachment

 Secure (65%)

 Relates to…

 Better social skills in preschoolers

 Better relationship with parents

 Less trouble in adolescence

 Better relationships with romantic partners in young adulthood  Internal working model: a set of expectations about interactions  Anxious/avoidant (20%)

 Anxious/ambivalent (resistant) (10­15%)

 Disorganized (5­10%)

∙ Stability of attachment style

 Attachment style is resistant to change

 Roughly 85% of adults have the same attachment style as when they were infants  What predicts change?

 Changes in the relationship with the caregiver

 Intimate relationship with a romantic partner

 A person can have an "earned secure" style by working at it

∙ Father care

 Mothers get studied more often than fathers

 Father's involvement predicts better outcomes for children (high school  achievement, fewer behavioral problems)

 Fathers add a unique component (e.g., play styles)

∙ Temperament

 Precursor to personality

 There is a strong genetic component

 Shyness is one component of temperament that has been well studied  Children who are extremely shy or extremely outgoing tend to stay that  way

 Children in the middle of the shy spectrum tend to move around a bit  With shy kids especially, there are psychological differences in reactivity  to a new situation

 Some kids have difficult temperaments, some have easy ones

 The trick is "goodness of fit," meaning that it is the interaction of caregiving and  temperament that matters

­ "Social and Personality Development in Childhood" Reading ­

Note: childhood social and personality development emerges through the interaction of social  influences, biological maturation, and the child’s representations of the social world and the self ∙ Understanding social and personality development requires looking at children from three perspectives that interact to shape development

1. The social context in which each child lives, especially the relationships that  provide security, guidance, and knowledge

2. Biological maturation that supports developing social and emotional  competencies and underlies temperamental individuality

3. Children’s developing representations of themselves and the social world.

Relationships 

∙ Virtually all infants living in normal circumstances develop strong emotional attachments to those who care for them

∙ Attachments have evolved in humans because they promote children’s motivation to stay  close to those who care for them and, as a consequence, to benefit from the learning,  security, guidance, warmth, and affirmation that close relationships provide

∙ Infants become securely attached when their parents respond sensitively to them,  reinforcing the infants’ confidence that their parents will provide support when needed  Infants become insecurely attached when care is inconsistent or neglectful  These infants tend to respond avoidantly, resistantly, or in a disorganized  manner

 Such insecure attachments are not necessarily the result of deliberately bad  parenting but are often a byproduct of circumstances

∙ To assess the nature of attachment, researchers use a standard laboratory procedure called the “Strange Situation,” which involves brief separations from the caregiver (e.g., mother) ∙ Security of attachment: an infant’s confidence in the sensitivity and responsiveness of a  caregiver, especially when he or she is needed

 An important cornerstone of social and personality development

 Infants and young children who are securely attached have been found to develop  stronger friendships with peers, more advanced emotional understanding and early  conscience development, and more positive self­concepts, compared with insecurely  attached children

∙ Authoritative: a parenting style characterized by high (but reasonable) expectations for  children’s behavior, good communication, warmth and nurturance, and the use of reasoning (rather than coercion) as preferred responses to children’s misbehavior

 By contrast, some less­constructive parent­child relationships result from  authoritarian (high expectations/control, low warmth/responsiveness), uninvolved  (low expectations/control, low warmth/responsiveness), or permissive parenting  styles (low expectations/control, high warmth/responsiveness)

∙ Family Stress Model: a description of the negative effects of family financial difficulty  on child adjustment through the effects of economic stress on parents’ depressed mood,  increased marital problems, and poor parenting

∙ Peer relationships

 Social interaction with another child who is similar in age, skills, and knowledge  provokes the development of many social skills that are valuable for the rest of life  Children learn how to initiate and maintain social interactions with other children  Being accepted by other children is an important source of affirmation and self esteem, but peer rejection can foreshadow later behavior problems (especially when  children are rejected due to aggressive behavior)

Social Understanding 

∙ Young children begin developing social understanding very early in life  Before the end of the first year, infants are aware that other people have  perceptions, feelings, and other mental states that affect their behavior, and which are  different from the child’s own mental states

∙ Social referencing: the process by which one individual (child) consults another’s  (mother's) emotional expressions to determine how to evaluate and respond to  circumstances that are ambiguous or uncertain

 If the mother looks calm and reassuring, the infant responds positively as if the  situation is safe

 If the mother looks fearful or distressed, the infant is likely to respond with  wariness or distress because the mother’s expression signals danger

∙ Theory of mind: children’s growing understanding of the mental states that affect  people’s behavior

Personality 

∙ Temperament: early emerging differences in reactivity and self­regulation, which  constitutes a foundation for personality development

 Although temperament is biologically based, it interacts with the influence of  experience from the moment of birth (if not before) to shape personality

∙ More generally, personality is shaped by the goodness of fit between the child’s  temperamental qualities and characteristics of the environment

 Goodness of fit: the match or synchrony between a child’s temperament and  characteristics of parental care that contributes to positive or negative personality  development

 A good “fit” means that parents have accommodated to the child’s temperamental attributes, and this contributes to positive personality growth and better adjustment ∙ As children mature biologically, temperamental characteristics emerge and change over  time

Social and Emotional Competence 

∙ Conscience: the cognitive, emotional, and social influences that cause young children to  create and act consistently with internal standards of conduct

 Emerges from young children’s experiences with parents, particularly in the  development of a mutually responsive relationship that motivates young children to  respond constructively to the parents’ requests and expectations

∙ Effortful control: a temperament quality that enables children to be more successful in  motivated self­regulation

∙ Conscience development grows through a good fit between the child’s temperamental  qualities and how parents communicate and reinforce behavioral expectations ∙ By the end of the preschool years, for example, young children develop a “moral self” by  which they think of themselves as people who want to do the right thing, who feel badly  after misbehaving, and who feel uncomfortable when others misbehave

∙ Gender schemas: organized beliefs and expectations about maleness and femaleness that  guide children’s thinking about gender

­ "Adolescent Development" Video ­

Development 

∙ Physical (puberty)

 HPG kicks off puberty

 HPG axis may respond to

 Physical maturity

 Time (an alarm clock)

 Presence of mature sexual partners

 Nutritional resources

 Leptin (body fat >11%)

 Stress (extreme stress or no stress delays the onset of puberty ­ mid­range  stress speeds it up)

 Affected by context

 Timing of physical changes in adolescence varies by

 Regions of the world

 Socioeconomic class

 Ethnic group

 Historical era 

 Ex. first menstruation ­ U.S. average = 12­13 years old, Lumi  (New Guinea) average = 18 years old

 Growth spurt 

 Rapid acceleration in growth (height and weight)

 Simultaneous release of growth hormones, thyroid hormones, and  androgens

 Peak height velocity ­ time that adolescent is growing most quickly  Note: average female growth spurt is 2 years earlier than the average male growth spurt

 Peak height velocity ­ 4 in./year in boys, 3.5 in./year in girls (same  as toddlers)

 Physical changes

 Nearly 1/2 of adult body weight is gained during adolescence

 Extremities growth spurt first (hands, feet, head), then arms and legs, torso last

 Boys and girls enter puberty with about the same amount of muscle:fat  ratio

 Boys exit with 3:1 (muscle:fat) ratio, while girls exist with 5:4  (muscle:fat) ratio

 Adolescents need food and sleep to fuel this massive growth spurt (1.5­2  times as many calories as adults)

∙ Cognitive ("remodeling")

 Brain growth

 Limbic system comes online in early adolescence

 Front cortex (inhibitory functions, moral reasoning, decision making)  continues to develop throughout adolescence

 Miss­matched development may occur for risk of taking during  adolescence

 Piaget's stage 4 ­ formal operational thought

 Abstract, systematic, scientific thinking

 Induction and deduction

 Hypothetical­deductive reasoning (isolate variables, test and revise  hypotheses)

 Propositional thought 

 Advanced perspective taking skills ­ thinking about what others think of  me (self­consciousness)

 Better at arguing (can see multiple perspectives, anticipate 

arguments, etc.)

 Can think about the ideal and criticize

 Increased social awareness and activism

 Increased criticism, can see the gap between actual and 

idea;

 Realization that knowledge is relative ­ adults can be wrong

∙ Social (assumption of adult roles and responsibilities)

 Forming a sense of self

 This is the task of adolescence because of the formal operational thinking  capacity

 Able to induce personality traits from watching people in a variety  of situations

 Begin to understand how past experiences shape personality

 Think about the stability of traits differently than children do  Difficult to integrate different selves from different contexts

 Family relationships

 Teens who get along and are close with their parents tend to get along and  have better relationships with their friends and romantic partners

 Teens fight more with parents about mundane things than they did when  they were younger

 Fight more with moms than with dads

 Firstborns fight more than 2nd borns

 Boys tend to fight about hygiene and behavior

 Girls tend to fight about dating and friendships

 Adolescents grow increasingly more influenced by peers, and less  influenced by parents ­ still they tend to share

 Parents' political viewpoints, manners and customs, values and  ethics, and friends' fashions

 Parents report being more stressed about these disagreements than  teens

Emerging adulthood: the period between the teenage years and assuming full adult roles ∙ In wealthy countries, this time period is longer than ever before (it is a luxury of those  who can afford it)

∙ Note: in 1890, there was a 7.2­year gap/interval between menarche (first menstruation)  and marriage

 In 2006, there was a 14.2­year gap/interval

­ "Adult Development" Video ­

Changes of Adulthood 

∙ Physical changes

 Menopause: the loss of fertility in women around age 50

 Sensory abilities decline

 Vision ­ 65 year olds need 3x the light that 20 years olds need to see  (changes in the pupil, retina)

 Hearing

 Smell

 Slower reaction times, muscle strength, and stamina in older adulthood (65+)  Immune system weakens with age, but we also accumulate lots of antibodies with  ago (less short­term illness)

∙ Cognitive changes

 Brains

 Processing/reaction time speed slows ­ implications for driving, memory  Loss of brain mass, especially in the frontal lobes (loss of inhibitory  function), but physical exercise can slow down these losses

 Exercise

 Increased oxygen and nutrient flow

 Stimulates neural connections and promotes neurogenesis in the  hippocampus

 Increases cellular mitochondria

 Helps maintain telomeres

 Enhances memory and judgment

 Lowers risk of significant cognitive decline

 Cognitive changes in the brain

 Risk of Alzheimer's and Dementia increase dramatically as we age  Memory gradually declines

 Recall gets worse for new material, steady for meaningful material  Recognition memory is steady

 Prospective memory declines

 Intelligence

 Fluid intelligence (abstract, fact reasoning) declines

 Crystallized intelligence (accumulated knowledge) holds

 Wisdom increases with age

 Brain training exercises world ­ but the skills don't generalize far  Take home message = practice what you want to maintain

∙ Social changes

 Erikson ­ the world of adulthood is:

 Intimacy (young adulthood)

 Human beings tend to pair­bond; these bonds tend to last when  partners:

 Share similar interests and values

 Share emotional and financial support

 Enjoy intimate disclosure

 Take a vow (marriage)

 Marry after age 20 

 Are well education

 Don't live together before they get married

 Marriage predicts (is correlated with higher rates of):

 Sexual satisfaction

 Income

 Physical health

 Mental health

 Marriage tends to last when couples maintain a 5:1 ratio of positive to negative interactions (Gottman)

 This principle actually generalizes to other relationships as  well

 Generativity (middle adulthood) ­ caring for the rising generation  Integration (older adulthood) ­ feeling a sense of satisfaction as you look  back on life

 Emotions later in life

 Self esteem remains stable

 Emotional experiences become more complex

 Positive feelings grow

 Negative feelings subside

 Older adults attend to positive information more than negative information  Enhanced emotional control (less drama)

 Smaller social networks, fewer friendships, although they tend to be deep  Less attachment anxiety, stress, and anger

 More stable and accepting

­ "Aging" Reading ­

Note: Contemporary theories and research recognizes that biogenetic and psychological  processes of aging are complex and lifelong

Note: because of increases in average life expectancy, each new generation can expect to live  longer than their parents’ generation and certainly longer than their grandparents’ generation

Life span theory: theory of development that emphasizes the patterning of lifelong within­ and  between­person differences in the shape, level, and rate of change trajectories

Life Span and Life Course Perspectives on Aging 

∙ In each decade of adulthood, we observe substantial heterogeneity in cognitive  functioning, personality, social relationships, lifestyle, beliefs, and satisfaction with life  Heterogeneity: inter­individual and subgroup differences in level and rate of  change over time

∙ Life course theory: theory of development that highlights the effects of social  expectations of age­related life events and social roles

 Additionally, considers the lifelong cumulative effects of membership in specific  cohorts and sociocultural subgroups and exposure to historical events

 Cohort: group of people typically born in the same year or historical  period, who share common experiences over time; sometimes called a 

generation

 Complement the life­course perspective with a greater focus on processes within  the individual (e.g., the aging brain)

 Approach emphasizes the patterning of lifelong change in intra­ and inter individual differences: different patterns of development observed within an  individual (intra­) or between individuals (inter­)

 Both life course and life span researchers generally rely on longitudinal studies to  examine hypotheses about different patterns of aging associated with the effects of  biogenetic, life history, social, and personal factors

 Cross­sectional studies provide information about age­group differences,  but these are confounded with cohort, time of study, and historical effects

Cognitive Aging 

∙ Researchers have identified areas of both losses and gains in cognition in older age ∙ Cognitive ability and intelligence are often measured using standardized tests and  validated measures ­ psychometric approach: approach to studying intelligence that  examines performance on tests of intellectual functioning

 Has identified two categories of intelligence that show different rates of change  across the life span

1. Fluid intelligence: type of intelligence that relies on the ability to use  information processing resources to reason logically and solve novel problems  (ex. logical reasoning, remembering lists, spatial ability, and reaction time)

2. Crystallized intelligence: type of intellectual ability that relies on the  application of knowledge, experience, and learned information

 Measures of crystallized intelligence include vocabulary tests,  solving number problems, and understanding texts

∙ With age, systematic declines are observed on cognitive tasks requiring self­initiated,  effortful processing, without the aid of supportive memory cues

∙ Older adults tend to perform poorer than young adults on memory tasks that involve  recall: type of memory task where individuals are asked to remember previously learned  information without the help of external cues

 As we age, the following becomes less efficient ­ working memory: memory  system that allows for information to be simultaneously stored and utilized or  manipulated

 The ability to process information quickly also decreases with age ­ slowing of  processing speed: the time it takes individuals to perform cognitive operations § May explain age differences on many different cognitive tasks

 Inhibitory function: ability to focus on a subset of information while suppressing  attention to less relevant information

§ Some researchers have argued declines with age and may explain age  differences in performance on cognitive tasks

 Longitudinal research has proposed that deficits in sensory functioning explain  age differences in a variety of cognitive abilities

§ Ex. hearing, vision

Fewer age differences are observed when memory cues are available, such as for  recognition: type of memory task where individuals are asked to remember previously  learned information with the assistance of cues

Personality and Self­Related Processes 

∙ Research on adult personality examines normative age­related increases and decreases in  the expression of the so­called "Big Five" traits

1. Extraversion

2. Neuroticism

3. Conscientiousness

4. Agreeableness 

5. Openness to new experience

§ Note: longitudinal studies reveal average changes during adulthood in the  expression of some traits (e.g., neuroticism and openness decrease with age and  conscientiousness increases) and individual differences in these patterns due to  idiosyncratic life events (e.g., divorce, illness)

In contrast to the relative stability of personality traits, theories about the aging self propose changes in self­related knowledge, beliefs, and autobiographical narratives: a 

qualitative research method used to understand characteristics and life themes that an  individual considers to uniquely distinguish him­ or herself from others

§ Theory suggests that as we age, themes that were relatively unimportant in young  and middle adulthood gain in salience (e.g., generativity, health) and that people view themselves as improving over time

§ Reorganizing personal life narratives and self­descriptions are the major tasks of  midlife and young­old age due to transformations in professional and family roles and obligations

 In advanced old age, self­descriptions are often characterized by a life  review and reflections about having lived a long life

Subjective age: a multidimensional construct that indicates how old (or young) a person  feels and into which age group a person categorizes him­ or herself

§ One aspect of the self that particularly interests life span and life course  psychologists

§ After early adulthood, most people say that they feel younger than their  chronological age and the gap between subjective age and actual age generally  increases

§ Asking people how satisfied they are with their own aging assesses an evaluative  component of age identity: how old or young people feel compared to their  chronological age; after early adulthood, most people feel younger than their  chronological age

§ Feeling younger and being satisfied with one’s own aging are expressions of  positive self­perceptions of aging: an individual’s perceptions of their own aging  process

 Positive perceptions of aging have been shown to be associated with  greater longevity and health

Social Relationships 

∙ Social ties to family, friends, mentors, and peers are primary resources of information,  support, and comfort

∙ Across the life course, social ties are accumulated, lost, and transformed  Already in early life, there are multiple sources of heterogeneity in the  characteristics of each person's social network: network of people with whom an  individual is closely connected

 Social networks provide emotional, informational, and material support  and offer opportunities for social engagement

∙ Convoy model of social relations: theory that proposes that the frequency, types, and  reciprocity of social exchanges change with age

 These social exchanges impact the health and well­being of the givers and  receivers in the convoy

 Social connections that people accumulate are held together by exchanges in  social support (e.g., tangible and emotional)

 In many relationships, it is not the actual objective exchange of support that is  critical but instead the perception that support is available if needed

∙ Socioemotional selective theory: theory proposed to explain the reduction of social  partners in older adulthood ­ posits that older adults focus on meeting emotional over  information­gathering goals, and adaptively select social partners who meet this need

 To optimize the experience of positive affect, older adults actively restrict their  social life to prioritize time spent with emotionally close significant others

Emotion and Well­Being 

∙ Global subjective well­being: assesses individuals’ perceptions of and satisfaction with  their lives as a whole

 Can include questions about life satisfaction or judgments of whether individuals  are currently living the best life possible

 Age, health, personality, social support, and life experiences have been shown to  influence judgments of global well­being

 It is important to note that predictors of well­being may change as we age  What is important to life satisfaction in young adulthood can be different  in later adulthood

 Different life events influence well­being in different ways, and individuals do not often adapt back to baseline levels of well­being

 Research suggests that global well­being is highest in early and later adulthood  and lowest in midlife

∙ Hedonic well­being: component of well­being that refers to emotional experiences, often  including measures of positive (e.g., happiness, contentment) and negative affect (e.g.,  stress, sadness)

 The pattern of positive affect across the adult life span is similar to that of global  well­being

 Experiences of positive emotions such as happiness and enjoyment being  highest in young and older adulthood

 Experiences of negative affect, particularly stress and anger, tend to decrease with age

∙ Ryff’s model of psychological well­being ­ core dimensions of positive well­being  Older adults tend to report:

 Higher environmental mastery (feelings of competence and control in  managing everyday life) 

 Higher autonomy (independence)

 Lower personal growth 

 Lower purpose in life

 Similar levels of positive relations with others as younger individuals ∙ Links between health and interpersonal flourishing, or having high­quality connections  with others, may be important in understanding how to optimize quality of life in old age

Successful Aging and Longevity 

∙ Average life expectancy: mean number of years that 50% of people in a specific birth  cohort are expected to survive

 Typically calculated from birth but is also sometimes re­calculated for people  who have already reached a particular age (e.g., 65)

∙ Evidence from twin studies that suggests that genes account for only 25% of the variance  in human life spans ­ has opened new questions about implications for individuals and  society

∙ Suggestions that pathological change (e.g., dementia) is not an inevitable component of  aging and that pathology could at least be delayed until the very end of life led to theories  about successful aging: Includes three components 

 The relative avoidance of disease, disability, and risk factors like high blood  pressure, smoking, or obesity

 The maintenance of high levels of cognitive and physical functioning  Active engagement in social and productive activities 

 Note: it is recognized, however, that societal and environmental factors also play  a role and that there is much room for social change and technical innovation

­ "Sensation and Perception" Video ­

Sensation: the process of detecting physical energy (a stimulus) from the environment and  converting it into neural signals

∙ Perception: when we select, organize, and interpret our sensations

Bottom­up processing: analysis of the stimulus begins with the sense receptors and works up to  the level of the brain and mind

Top­down processing: information processing guided by higher­level mental processes as we  construct perception, drawing on our experience and expectations

∙ Involves making sense of what we are seeing

∙ Imposing meaning on the stimuli

Note: while viewing a picture of horses and riders…

∙ Bottom­up processing means we take in the lines, angles, and colors to construct an  image

∙ Top­down processing means we notice the title, the apprehension of the horses and rider,  and we "construct" additional visual images

Sensing the World 

∙ Senses are nature's gift that suit an organism's needs

∙ Exploring the senses

 What stimuli cross our threshold for conscious awareness?

 Absolute threshold: minimum stimulation needed to detect a particular stimulus  50% of the time

 Subliminal threshold: when stimuli are below one's absolute threshold for  conscious awareness

 Do subliminal message influence us?

 Yes (priming effects)

 No (no lasting change of behavior)

∙ Signal detection theory

 Whether or not we perceive a stimulus depends on:

 Experience

 Expectations 

 Motivations

 Alertness

 Signal detection theory predicts when we will perceive a signal, and when we  won't 

∙ Weber's Law

 Two stimuli must differ by a constant minimum percentage (rather than a constant amount), to be perceived as different

∙ Sensory adaptation: the idea that we have diminished sensitivity to constant stimulation  Ex. puts a band aid on your arm and after awhile you don't sense it  Helps us not become crazy ­ the world would be overwhelming if we were  constantly aware of everything

 Helps us focus on important stuff

 Functional because it allows us to focus on changes in stimuli (on our  environment)

 Why don't eyes adapt to images in front of you, leaving you blind?  Eyes are constantly moving, even when you are taking in a single scene,  your eyes jump around over the scene

∙ Perceptual set

 A mental predisposition to perceive one thing and not another

 What you perceive is directly influenced by what you've been looking at or  thinking about previously

∙ Context effects

 In addition to perceptual set, context can radically alter perception (what is going  on around the stimuli)

 Cultural context ­ context instilled by culture also alters perception ∙ Emotions and motivation

 Alter perception

 Examples

 A hill looks steeper when you are wearing a heavy backpack

 Destinations seem farther when you are fatigued

 Baseballs look bigger when you're on a hitting streak

­ "Vision" Video ­

Vision 

∙ Stimulus input = light energy

∙ Physical characteristics of light

 Wavelength (hue/color)

 Intensity (brightness)

∙ Hue (color): the dimension of color determined by the wavelength of the light

 Wavelength: the distance from the peak of one wave to the peak of the next  Short wavelength = high frequency (bluish colors, high­pitched sounds)  Long wavelength = low frequency (reddish colors, low­pitched sounds)

 Short wavelengths (400 nm) <­­ violent ­­ indigo ­­ blue ­­ green ­­ yellow ­­  orange ­­ red ­­> (700 nm) long wavelengths 

 Different wavelengths of light result in different colors

∙ Intensity: amount of energy in a wave determined by the amplitude (height of  wavelengths)

 Related to perceived brightness

 As the intensity of a color, like blue, increases or decreases, the color  looks more "washed out" or "darkened"

 Great amplitude = bright colors, loud sounds

 Small amplitude = dull colors, soft sounds

The Eye 

∙ Parts of the eye

 Cornea: transparent tissue where light enters the eye

 Iris: muscle that expands and contracts to change the size of the opening (pupil)  for light

 Lens: focuses the light rays on the retina

 Transparent structure behind the pupil that changes shape to focus images  on the retina

 Accommodation: the process by which the eye's lens changes shape to  help focus near or far objects on the retina

 Retina: contains sensory receptors that process visual information and sends it to  the brain

 The light­sensitive inner surface of the eye, containing receptor rods and  cones in additional layers of other neurons (bipolar, ganglion cells) that process  visual information

 Steps

1. Light entering eye triggers photochemical reaction in rods and  cones at back of retina

2. Chemical reaction in turn activates bipolar cells

3. Bipolar cells then activate the ganglion cells, the axons of which  converge to form the optic nerve

 Optic nerve: carries neural impulses, transmitting information to the visual cortex (via the thalamus), from the eye to the brain

§ Blind spot: point where the optic nerve leaves the eye because  there are no receptor cells located there

 Fovea: central point in the retina around which the eye's cones cluster   Photoreceptors

 Cones

§ Number ­ 6 million

§ Center of the retina

§ Low sensitivity in dim light

§ Color and detail sensitive

 Rods

§ Number ­ 120 million

§ Periphery in retina

§ High sensitivity in dim light

§ No color or detail sensitivity

 Bipolar cells: receive messages from photoreceptors and transmit them to  ganglion cells, which converge to form the optic nerve

Visual information processing

 Optic nerves connect to the thalamus in the middle of the brain, and the thalamus  connects to the visual cortex

 Parallel processing: processing of several aspects of the stimulus simultaneously   The brain divides a visual scene into subdivisions such as color, depth,  form, movement, etc.

Feature detection

 Nerve cells in the visual cortex respond to specific features, such as edges, angles, and movement

 Supercell clusters

 Some individual cells are specifically designated to perceive angles and  forms, or also a specific gaze, posture, or body movement

 We also have clusters of supercells that integrate information and fire only when various pieces of information indicate the direction of attention and  approach of another person (e.g., goalies and strikers)

 Shape detection

 Specific combinations of temporal lobe activity occur as people look at  shoes, faces, chairs, and houses

­ "Perceptual Organization" Video ­

Note: how do we form meaningful perceptions from sensory information? ∙ We organize it

∙ Gestalt psychologists showed that a figure formed a "whole" different than its  surroundings

Perceptual Organization 

∙ Form perception (ex. figure and ground)

∙ After distinguishing the figure from the ground, our perceptions need to organize the  figure into a meaningful form using grouping rules

 The brain puts stuff together and fills in the gaps to create meaning ∙ Grouping rules

 Proximity

 Similarity

 Continuity

 Connectedness 

 Note: although grouping principles usually help us construct reality, they may  occasionally lead us astray

∙ Depth perception

 Enables us to judge distances

 Gibson and Walk (1960) suggested that human infants (crawling age) have depth  perception

 Even newborn animals show depth perception

 Ex. babies and visual cliffs

 Binocular cues

 Retinal disparity: images from the two eyes differ

 Monocular cues

 Relative size: if two objects are similar in size, we perceive the one that  casts a smaller retinal image to be farther away

 Interposition: objects that occlude (block) other objects tend to be  perceived as closer

 Relative height: we perceive objects that are higher in our field of vision  to be farther away than those that are lower

 Linear perspective: parallel lines, such as railroad tracks, appear to  converge in the distance

 The more the lines converge, the greater their perceived distance ∙ Motion perception

 Mostly perceive shrinking objects as retreating

 Enlarging objects as getting closer

 Large stuff looks like it moves more slowly than small stuff (despite same speed)  Stroboscopic effect: 24 still framers per second looks like motion (a motion  picture)

∙ Types of constancy

 Perceptual constancy: perceiving objects as unchanging even as illumination and  retinal images change

 Size­distance relationship

 Color constancy: perceiving familiar objects as having consistent color even when changing illumination filters the light reflected by the object

 Contextual cues help our brains interpret color based on light reflected  relative to objects that surround it

 Lightness constancy

 Shape constancy

∙ Perceptual interpretation

 Immanuel Kant (1724­1804) maintained that knowledge comes from our inborn  ways of organizing sensory experiences

 John Locke (1632­1704) argued that we learn to perceive the world through our  experiences

 How important is experience in shaping our perceptual interpretation? ∙ Critical periods

 After cataract surgery, blind adults were able to regain sight

 These individuals could differentiate figure and ground relationships, yet  they had difficulty distinguishing a circle and a triangle

 Adults with normal vision who developed cataracts and then had them removed  had no problem

 There is a critical period

 Once you've got the brain tissue dedicated to visual stimuli, it seems you  do not lose it, even if you late lose vision

∙ Perceptual adaptation: visual ability to adjust to an artificially displaced visual field (e.g.,  prism glasses)

­ "Sensation and Perception" Reading ­

Sensation: the physical processing of environmental stimuli by the sense organs ∙ During sensation, our sense organs are engaging in transduction: the conversion of one  form of energy into another

 Physical energy (ex. light, sound) is converted into a form the brain can  understand ­ electrical stimulation

Perception: the psychological process of interpreting sensory information

Absolute threshold: the smallest amount of stimulation needed for detection by a sense ∙ Measure by using signal detection: method for studying the ability to correctly identify  sensory stimuli

 Process involves presenting stimuli of varying intensities to a research participant  in order to determine the level at which he or she can reliably detect stimulation in a  given sense

Differential threshold: the smallest difference needed in order to differentiate two stimuli ∙ Also known as just noticeable difference (JND)

∙ Weber's law: states that just noticeable difference is proportional to the magnitude of the  initial stimulus

Bottom­up processing: building up to perceptual experience from individual pieces Top­down processing: experience influencing the perception of stimuli

Sensory adaptation: decrease in sensitivity of a receptor to a stimulus after constant stimulation

Vision 

∙ How it works

1. Light enters the eye through the pupil, a tiny opening behind the cornea 2. The pupil regulates the amount of light entering the eye by contracting (getting  smaller) in bright light and dilating (getting larger) in dimmer light

3. Once past the pupil, light passes through the lens, which focuses an image on a  thin layer of cells in the back of the eye, called the retina: cell layer in the back of the  eye containing photoreceptors

 Two main kinds of photoreceptors:

1. Rods: sensitive to low levels of light; located around the fovea 2. Cones: sensitive to color; located primarily in the fovea

1. Electrical signal is sent through a layer of cells in the retina, eventually traveling  down the optic nerve

2. After passing through the thalamus, this signal makes it to the primary visual  cortex: area of the cortex involved in processing visual stimuli

3. Information is then sent to a variety of different areas of the cortex for more  complex processing

 Some of these cortical regions are fairly specialized (ex. for processing  faces ­ fusiform face area) 

§ Damage to these areas of the cortex can potentially result in a  specific kind of agnosia: loss of the ability to perceive stimuli

 These specialized regions for visual recognition comprise the ventral  pathway: the "what" pathway

 Other areas involved in processing location and movement make up the  dorsal pathway: the "where" pathway

 Phenomena we often refer to as optical illusions provide misleading  information to these "higher" areas of visual processing

 Binocular disparity: difference is images processed by the left and right eyes  Binocular vision: our ability to perceive 3D and depth because of the difference  between the images on each of our retinas

Dark and light adaptation

 Rods are primarily involved in our ability to see in dim light  Dark adaptation: adjustment of eye to low levels of light

 Night vision ability takes around 10 minutes to turn on ­ our rods become  bleached in normal light conditions and require time to recover

 Light adaptation: adjustment of eye to high levels of light

 When we leave some place dark and head out into the light, a large  number of rods and cones are bleached at once, causing us to be blinded for a  few seconds

 Happens almost instantly compared with dark adaptation

Color vision

 Our cones allow us to see details in normal light conditions, as well as color  We have cones that respond preferentially, not exclusively, for red, green and  blue

 Trichromatic theory: theory proposing color vision as influenced by three  different cones responding preferentially to red, green and blue; dates back to  the early 19th century

§ Doesn't explain afterimage 

 Opponent­process theory: theory proposing color vision as influenced by cells  responsive to pairs of colors

 states that our cones send information to retinal ganglion cells that respond to pairs of colors

§ Red­green, blue­yellow, black­white

 These specialized cells take information from the cones and compute the  difference between the two colors—a process that explains why we cannot see  reddish­green or bluish­yellow, as well as why we see afterimages

 Color blindness can result from issues with the cones or retinal ganglion cells  involved in color vision

Hearing 

∙ Sound waves: changes in air pressure

 The physical stimulus for audition: ability to process auditory stimuli; also called  hearing

∙ The amplitude (or intensity) of a sound wave codes for the loudness of a stimulus  Higher amplitude sound waves result in louder sounds

∙ The pitch of a stimulus is coded in the frequency of a sound wave

 Higher frequency sounds are higher pitched

∙ Can gauge the quality, or timbre, of a sound by the complexity of the sound wave  Allows us to tell the difference between bright and dull sounds, as well as natural  and synthesized instruments

∙ In order to us to sense sound waves from our environment they must reach our inner ear  Sound waves are funneled by our pinna: outermost portion of the ear that you can  actually see

 Funneled into the auditory canal: tube running from the outer ear to the middle ear  Sound waves eventually the tympanic membrane: thin, stretched membrane in the middle ear that vibrates in response to sound; also called the eardrum

 Ossicles: a collection of three small bones in the middle ear (malleus ­  hammer, incus ­ anvil), stapes ­stirrup) that vibrate against the tympanic 

membrane

 Both the tympanic membrane and the ossicles amplify the sound waves before  they enter the fluid­filled cochlea: spiral bone structure in the inner ear containing  auditory hair cells: receptors in the cochlea that transduce sound into electrical  potentials

 Depending on age, humans can normally detect sounds between 20 Hz and 20 kHz

 After being processed by auditory hair cells, electrical signals are sent through the cochlear nerve (a division of the vestibulocochlear nerve) to the thalamus, and then  the primary auditory cortex: area of the cortex involved in processing auditory stimuli

∙ Because we have an ear on each side of our head, we are capable of localizing sound in  3D space pretty well

∙ Balance and the vestibular system

 Inner ear is also associated with our ability to balance and detect where we are in  space

 Vestibular system: parts of the inner ear involved in balance

 Comprised of three semicircular canals ­ fluid­filled bone structures  containing cells that respond to changes in the head's orientation in space

 Information from the vestibular system is sent through the vestibular nerve (the  other division of the vestibulocochlear nerve) to muscles involved in the movement of our eyes, neck, and other parts of our body

 This information allows us to maintain our gaze on an object while we are  in motion

 Disturbances in the vestibular system can result in issues with balance, including  vertigo

Touch 

∙ Somatosensation: ability to sense touch, pain and temperature

∙ Tactile sensation

 Those that are associated with texture ­ are transduced by special receptors in the  skin called mechanoreceptors: mechanical sensory receptors in the skin that response  to tactile stimulation

 After tactile stimuli are converted by mechanoreceptors, information is sent  through the thalamus to the primary somatosensory cortex: area of the cortex  involved in processing somatosensory stimuli

 This region of the cortex is organized in a somatotopic map: organization  of the primary somatosensory cortex maintaining a representation of the 

arrangement of the body

 Different regions are sized based on the sensitivity of specific pars  on the opposite side of the body

∙ Pain

 Nociception: our ability to sense pain

 The perception of pain is our body’s way of sending us a signal that something is  wrong and needs our attention

 Phantom limbs: the perception that a missing limb still exists

 Can involve phantom limb pain: pain in a limb that no longer exists  There is an interesting treatment for the alleviation of phantom limb pain  that works by tricking the brain ­ using a special mirror box to create a visual  representation of the missing limb

Smell and Taste 

∙ Chemical senses: our ability to process the environmental stimuli of smell and taste  Both olfaction (smell) and gustation (taste) require the transduction of chemical  stimuli into electrical potentials

 The receptors involved in our perception of both smell and taste bind directly with the stimuli they transduce

∙ Olfaction (smell)

 Odorants: chemicals transduced by olfactory receptors

 Bind with olfactory receptors found in the olfactory epithelium: organ  containing olfactory receptors

 Shape theory of olfaction: theory proposing that odorants of different size  and shape correspond to different smells

 Is not universally accepted, and alternative theories exist (ex. 

vibrations of odorant molecules correspond to their subjective smells)

 Regardless of how odorants bind with receptors, the result is a pattern of  neural activity

 Because olfactory receptors send projections to the brain through the cribriform  plate of the skull, head trauma has the potential to cause anosmia: loss of the ability to smell

∙ Gustation (taste)

 Taste receptor cells: receptors that transduce gustatory information  Taste buds are not the bumps on your tongue (papillae), but are located in  small divots around these bumps

 Receptors also respond to chemicals from the outside environment  (contained in the foods we eat)

 Tastants: chemicals transduced by taste receptor cells

 The binding of tastant chemicals with taste receptor cells result in our perception  of the five basic tastes:

 Sweet

 Sour

 Bitter

 Salty

 Umami (savory)

 All areas of the tongue with taste receptor cells are capable of responding to every taste

 During the process of eating, we are not limited to our sense of taste alone  While we are chewing, food odorants are forced back up to areas that  contain olfactory receptors

 This combination of taste and smell gives us the perception of flavor: the  combination of smell and taste

Multimodal perception: the effects that concurrent stimulation in more than one sensory modality has on the perception of events and objects in the world

∙ Superadditive effect of multisensory: the finding that responses to multimodal stimuli are  typically greater than the sum of the independent responses to each unimodal component if  it were presented on its own

∙ Principle of inverse effectiveness: the finding that, in general, for a multimodal stimulus,  if the response to each unimodal component (on its own) is weak, then the opportunity for  multisensory enhancement is very large

 However, if one component ­ by itself ­ is sufficient to evoke a strong response,  then the effect on the response gained by simultaneously processing the other  components of the stimulus will be relatively small

∙ Note: while there is simplicity in covering each sensory modality independently, we are  organisms that have evolved the ability to process multiple modalities as a unified  experience

­ "Conditioning," Video ­

Conditioning 

∙ Classical conditioning = pairing the uncontrolled stimulus with the controlled stimulus to  get the controlled response

 Before conditioning

1. Unconditioned stimulus [food] ­­> unconditioned response [salivation] 2. Neutral stimulus [sound] ­­> no conditioned response [salivation]  During conditioning

1. Sound + food ­­> unconditioned response [salivation]

2. Conditioned stimulus [sound] ­­> conditioned response [salivation]  Note: we are all classically conditioned

 Big names in classical conditioning

§ Ivan Pavlov

§ Jon Watson

Operant conditioning = the pattern of reinforcement facilitates behavior

 Learning by association ­ learning is about how my behavior can produce  consequences that I enjoy or do not enjoy

 B.F. Skinner built on Thorndike's Law of Effect

§ Law of Effect: says that behavior that produces satisfying effect in a  situation are more likely to occur again in that situation; whereas behaviors that  that produce a "discomforting effect" in a situation are less likely to re­occur § We repeat what is rewarding, and tend to not repeat what isn't 

 Skinner box: a box in which a rat can push a lever to get food

§ Rat learns to push the lever to get food

§ You can teach the rat to push the lever only when the light comes on, or  you can mess with how often the rat has to push the lever in order to get the  food

§ Electric grid on the bottom so that the rat can also be punished for pushing the lever at the wrong time

§ Box has lights and speaker so that you can use reinforcement or  punishment to get the rat to respond to light and sound cues Basic idea ­ rats,  like humans, learn quickly what behaviors get them what they want

§ Note: Skinner and his followers did many experiments showing how  behavior can be shaped, when reinforcement is most effective, etc.

 Big names in operant conditioning

§ Edward Thorndike

§ B.F. Skinner

Reinforcement

 Reinforces

§ Anything likely to increase a behavior

§ Positive reinforcers = something given (e.g., treat)

§ Negative reinforcers = something taken away (e.g., headache)  Punishers

§ Anything likely to decrease the behavior

§ Positive punishers = something given (e.g., extra chores)

§ Negative punishers = something taken away (e.g., video games)  Note: negative reinforcement is not punishment

§ The key difference between positive and negative is whether something  was presented (positive) or removed (negative)

§ Other key is whether the consequence is designed to increase (reward) or  decrease (punish) the behavior

Classical versus operant conditioning

 Classical conditioning

§ We associate a stimulus with an event

§ A response is elicited by a stimulus

§ The sequence is mostly voluntary

 Operant conditioning 

§ We associate a behavior with an event

§ A response is emitted

§ The sequence is voluntary 

Reinforcement schedules: refers to the frequency to which a behavior is reinforced  Depending on the reinforcement schedule, the future desired or undesired  behavior will be affected

 Extinction: refers to the behavior stopping after the reinforcement stops § Because learning was so rapid, extinction is also very useful  Spontaneous recovery: refers to the reappearance of the behavior after extinction  but not due to reinforcement

 Continuous reinforcement: refers to a schedule of reinforcing the behavior every  single time it occurs

§ Very useful for learning new behaviors

 Partial (intermittent) reinforcement: refers to a schedule of reinforcing the  behavior occasionally and not reinforcing the behavior other times; learning takes  longer

§ Highly resistant to extinction because of the unpredictability of when the  reward will come (ex. gambling)

§ Variable­ratio results in a high rate of responding

§ Behavior is reinforced after unpredictable number of responses  § Hard to extinguish

Applications in real life

 Personal context

 Professional context

 Clinical settings

§ Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA)

 Become aware of the pattern of reinforcement I give to others

Intrinsic motivation

 Beware of over­reinforcing that undermines intrinsic motivation

 Smiling, happiness, positive social interactions = huge rewards

­ "Social Learning Theory," Video ­

Social Learning Theory 

∙ Al Bandura

 Did not believe that learning is limited to what we've personally experienced by  classical, or even operant, conditioning

 Said that we can learn not only from our own experiences, but by observing the  experiences of others

 Social cognitive learning theory

∙ Social cognitive learning theory

 Observational learning: learning that occurs by watching and imitating others; no  direct experience needed

 Modeling: an individual provides an example for us to follow; something to  imitate

 Imitation

 We imitate both pro­social and anti­social models

 Children and adults are prone to imitate the behaviors (and attitudes) of  people around them

 Vicarious reinforcement or punishment

 We experience probably via mirror neurons

 Mirror neurons

 Presence means that we construct internal mental images (mirrors) of  actions that we observe in others

 Fire in the brain when we watch others doing something that we are  capable of doing

 Motor and sensory neurons do not fire, but other neurons 

associated with that action do

 Appears to be the biological basis for both imitation and for 

empathy

 Empathy and mental images may be about neural networks, rather than  mirror neurons (the debate continues…) 

 Contagion

 Our brains let us vicariously experience the emotions of others

 We can do this by observation, or even by reading accounts of others'  experiences

 We naturally mirror the emotions in others

 We imitate others' experiences in our brains (MRI scans), faces, and  bodies

∙ Violence and media

 Children spend more time watching TV than in school (in developed countries;  including the US)

 Teens average 4 hours a day (365 days a year) of use

 Adults average 3 hours a day (365 days a year) of use

 When TV was introduced in the US, and in South Africa, homicide rates doubled  Watching violence breeds intolerance and aggression

 In a study of over 400 elementary school children, aggression increases in  those heavily exposed to violent TV, videos, and video games, after controlling  for existing differences in hostility and aggression

 Experimental data: show attractive people committing justified, realistic violence  that goes unpunished and causes no visible harm or pain ­­> viewers respond with  more cruelty to other

 Imitation of anti­social acts desensitization to violence and cruelty  Watching murder may not make you a murderer; but think about the  exposure for those who are mentally ill/unstable

 The shape of our fantasies/dreams have changed

 We are putting violence in our subconscious library of alternative  responses

 You literally watch an avatar of yourself drive aggressively, engage in fist  fights, steal, kill, assassinate, and stab, other characters, and you get rewarded  for doing it

 The video game gives you a reward. You get a dopamine hit in your brain  for completing a task, for meeting a goal

­ "Cognitive and Learning," Reading ­

Two Types of Conditioning 

1. Classical conditioning: the procedure in which an initially neutral stimulus (the  conditioned stimulus, or CS) is paired with an unconditioned stimulus (or US)  The result is that the conditioned stimulus begins to elicit a conditioned response  (CR)

 Nowadays considered important as both a behavioral phenomenon and as a  method to study simple associative learning

 Same as Pavlovian conditioning

 Dog + bell + salivation experiment

 Straightforward test of associative learning that can be used to study other, more  complex behaviors

 Always occurring in our lives

 Unconditioned response (UR): an innate response that is elicited by a stimulus  before (or in the absence of) conditioning

 Unconditioned stimulus (US): stimulus that elicits the response before  conditioning occurs

 Conditioned response (CR): response that is elicited by the conditioned stimulus  after classical conditioning has taken place

 Conditioned stimulus (CS): an initially neutral stimulus (like a bell, light, or tone)  that elicits a conditioned response after it has been associated with an unconditioned  stimulus

 Animal behaves as if it has learned to associate a stimulus with a significant event  Response is elicited by a stimulus that comes before it

2. Instrumental conditioning: process in which animals learn about the relationship between  their behaviors and their consequences

 Also known as operant conditioning

 Occurs when a behavior (as opposed to a stimulus) is associated with the  occurrence of a significant event

 First studied by Edward Thorndike, and later extended by B.F. Skinner  Rat and Skinner box experiment

 Studies how the effects of a behavior influence the probability that it will occur  again

 Law of Effect: he idea that instrumental or operant responses are  influenced by their effects (Thorndike)

 Responses that are followed by a pleasant state of affairs will be  strengthened and those that are followed by discomfort will be weakened

 Provides a method for studying how consequences influence “voluntary” behavior  One of the lessons of operant conditioning research ­ voluntary behavior is strongly influenced by its consequences

 Operant: a behavior that is controlled by its consequences

 Simplest example is the rat's lever­pressing, which is controlled by the  presentation of the reinforcer

 Reinforcer: any consequence of a behavior that strengthens the behavior or  increases the likelihood that it will be performed it again

 Punisher: a stimulus that decreases the strength of an operant behavior when it is  made a consequence of the behavior

 Animal behaves as if it has learned to associate a behavior with a significant event  Response is not elicited by any particular stimulus

Useful Things to Know 

∙ Classical conditioning

 Has many effects on behavior

 Taste aversion learning: the phenomenon in which a taste is paired with  sickness, and this causes the organism to reject ­ and dislike ­ that taste in the  future

 Occurs with a variety of significant events

 Fear conditioning: a type of classical or Pavlovian conditioning in which  the conditioned stimulus (CS) is associated with an aversive unconditioned  stimulus (US), such as a foot shock. 

 As a consequence of learning, the CS comes to evoke fear

 The phenomenon is thought to be involved in the development of  anxiety disorders in humans

 Conditioned compensatory response: conditioned response that opposes,  rather than is the same as, the unconditioned response

 Functions to reduce the strength of the unconditioned response  Often seen in conditioning when drugs are used as unconditioned  stimuli

 Classical cues motivate ongoing operant behavior

 The learning process

 Studies show that pairing a controlled stimulus with an uncontrolled  stimulus together is not sufficient for an association to be learned between them  Blocking: the finding that no conditioning occurs to a stimulus if it  is combined with a previously conditioned stimulus during conditioning  trials

 Suggests that surprise value, or prediction error is 

important in conditioning

 Prediction error: when the outcome of a conditioning trial is  different from that which is predicted by the conditioned stimuli that are  present on the trial (i.e., when the US is surprising)

 Necessary to create Pavlovian conditioning (and associative learning generally)

 Tends to take in the most valid predictors of significant events and ignore  the less useful ones

 Classical conditioning is strongest if the conditioned stimulus and  unconditioned stimulus are intense of salient

 It is also best if the CS and US are relatively new and the organism hasn’t been frequently exposed to them before

 It is especially strong if the organism’s biology has prepared it to  associate a particular CS and US

 Preparedness: he idea that an organism’s evolutionary  history can make it easy to learn a particular association (ex. 

associating a particular food, instead of its surrounding environment, with illness)

 Erasing classical learning

 After conditioning, the response to the CS can be eliminated if the CS is  presented repeatedly without the US

 Extinction: decrease in the strength of a learned behavior that  occurs when the conditioned stimulus is presented without the 

unconditioned stimulus (in classical conditioning) or when the behavior is  no longer reinforced (in instrumental conditioning)

 Behaviors that have been reduced in strength through 

extinction are said to be "extinguished"

 Does not necessarily destroy the original learning 

(spontaneous recovery)

 Spontaneous recovery: recovery of an extinguished response that occurs  with the passage of time after extinction

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here