×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to WM - ECON 102 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to WM - ECON 102 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

WM / Math / ECON 102 / How the supply of and demand for loanable funds determine the market e

How the supply of and demand for loanable funds determine the market e

How the supply of and demand for loanable funds determine the market e

Description

School: College of William and Mary
Department: Math
Course: Principles: Macroeconomics
Professor: Mark greer
Term: Spring 2018
Tags: Macroeconomics, Study Guide, midterm 2, Keynesian Perspective, aggregate expenditures, multiplier, MPC, MPS, Income, GDP, consumption, Saving, investment, and loanablefunds
Cost: 50
Name: Econ 102: Study Guide 2
Description: This study guide covers everything that will be on the second macroeconomics test.
Uploaded: 03/24/2018
12 Pages 22 Views 7 Unlocks
Reviews


Principles: Macroeconomics (ECON 102)


How the supply of and demand for loanable funds determines the market equilibrium interest rate?



Study Guide 2 

Exam: 3/27/2018

*Short answers questions will be drawn from starred items

1. The identity, S+NCI = I+(G­T)

∙ Y = GDP, so Y = C + I + G + (X – IM) 

o So, Y – T = C + I + G + (X – IM) – T 

o Yd = C + I + G – T + (X – IM)

o C + S = C + I + (G – T) + (X – IM)

o S = I + (G – T) + (X – IM)

∙ Open Economy Saving­Investment Identity: S + (IM – X) = I + (G – T) or S + NCI = I +  (G – T) 

∙ The left side of the equation is the two sources of financing of the domestic financial  system (saving by households and funding by foreigners), and the right side of the  equation is the two uses of financing (borrowing by firms to finance capital expansion  and borrowing by the government to finance its deficit)


What causes the consumption function to shift and in what direction?



We also discuss several other topics like How does political violence differ from other forms of violence?

o Budget deficit = how much the government will borrow

2. The identity, I = Snational+NCI

∙ With some rearranging of the Open Economy Saving­Investment Identity, we get: o S + NCI = I + (G – T)

o I = S + NCI – (G – T)

o I = S + (T – G) + NCI

o I = Snational + NCI or Investment equals national saving plus Net Capital Inflow

3. The concept of future value and how to use the formula for future value ∙ Basic concept: A sum of money in­hand today will have a greater value because the  money can be used to purchase an interest­bearing financial asset, which will allow the  sum to grow

∙ Future Value (FV) of a present value in­hand (PV) is determined by:


How to do calculations involving the consumption function, the mpc and the mps?



If you want to learn more check out Be able to describe binary fission in bacteria and archaea?

∙ FV = PV(1 + i)n, where i is the nominal interest rate on the financial asset and n is the  number of years in the future that the future some will be obtained

4. The concept of present value and how to use the formula for present value ∙ Basic concept of Present Value (PV)­ A dollar received at some point in the future is  worth less than a dollar today because a person could put some amount less than a dollar  into an interest­bearing financial asset today and receive a full dollar at that point in the  future

∙ PV = FV / (1 + i)n 

∙ If you’re comparing cash flows that occur in different periods of time, you must put them on the same plane of present value Don't forget about the age old question of What is proteomics?
Don't forget about the age old question of Why don’t people vote?

5. Net present value and how to use it to determine whether an investment project is profitable ∙ Net Present Value (NPV) of the project is the sum of cash flows of an investment project, with cash outflows recorded negatively, cash inflows recorded positively, and each cash  flow discounted to its present value We also discuss several other topics like What are the differences that arise when costs of inventory change over time?

∙ NPV = [­(initial cash outflow) + (cash inflow 1 year from now)]/ [(1+i)2 + …] ∙ If and only if NPV is positive is the project profitable because PV inflows exceeds PV  outflows. If NPV is negative, the project is NOT profitable

*6. Sources of supply and sources of demand for loanable funds

∙ Suppliers of loanable funds:

o Households

o The government, if running a budget surplus

o Foreign entities, if the country is running a trade deficit (NCI > 0)

∙ Demanders of loanable funds:

o Firms

o The government, if running a budget deficit

o Foreign entities, if the country is running a trade surplus (NCO > 0)

*7. Why the quantity of loanable funds demanded is negatively related to interest ratesWe also discuss several other topics like What percent of u.s. companies were planning an increase in international business activity in 2017?

∙ If the nominal interest rate decreases, then present values of future cash inflows from  investment projects under consideration by firms increase; therefore, an increasing  number of investment projects have positive NPV and are therefore worth undertaking

∙ So, firms’ borrowings rise as they undertake more investment projects

8. The non­interest rate influences on the demand for loanable funds and what happens to the  demand for loanable funds when one of these influences changes

∙ Budget deficit: if the deficit rises, then there will be more demand for loanable funds at  any given interest rate

∙ Inflationary expectations: if expected inflation increases, then expected real interest rate on a loan goes down at any given nominal interest rate. There is more demand for  loanable funds because in real terms, credit is cheaper

∙ Business optimism: if businesses become more optimistic about future economic  conditions and profits, then NPVs on investment projects go up. Therefore, investment  spending rises and so does the demand for credit

∙ The NCO: if trade surplus rises, then foreign entities borrow even more from the  domestic financial system than before

*9. Why the quantity of loanable funds supplied is positively related to interest rates ∙ The higher is the nominal interest rate, the more attractive it is for households to save  rather than consume; therefore, quantity supplied will increase

10. The non­interest rate influences on the supply of loanable funds and what happens to the  supply of loanable funds when one of these influences changes

∙ Inflationary expectations: if the expected inflation rate rises, then the expected real  interest rate received on a loan falls. So, at any given nominal interest rate, fewer  quantities of loanable funds will be forthcoming 

∙ Households’ preferences regarding consumption vs. spending: if households become  fearful of the future economic conditions, then at whatever interest rate one considers,  they will save more. So, quantity supplied of loanable funds would increase

∙ Government budget surplus (if it has one): if surplus goes up, then government supplies more loanable funds, whatever the interest rate may be

∙ NCI: if trade deficit grows, then foreign entities supply more funding to domestic  financial system, whatever the interest rate may be

11. How the supply of and demand for loanable funds determines the market equilibrium interest rate

∙ More funds are being offered as loans at an interest rate of i than borrowers are willing to  borrow (QSLF1>QDLF1). 

o There is a surplus

∙ Lenders who cannot find a borrower cut interest rate on an offer to attract borrowers ∙ Interest eventually reaches an equilibrium rate

12. Analyze the effects of a change in supply of or change in demand for loanable funds on  interest rates and the dollar volume of loan transactions

∙ Ex. Suppose trade deficit increases, causing an increase in NCI

o Lower interest rates and volume of borrowing and lending:

o Quantity of loanable funds traded, or QeLF, rises

o Graphically shown as a rightward shift of the supply of loanable funds curve, or  SLF 

∙ Ex. Suppose government budget swings from a deficit to a surplus

o The government is no longer a borrower: DLF decreases, shown as a leftward shift of the demand of loanable funds curve

o The government now supplies loanable funds: SLF increases, so the supply of  loanable funds curve shifts right

o The impact on QeLF is ambiguous

13. The investment demand schedule

∙ What will total investment spending be? 

∙ Ex. Suppose that, on average, firms can get financed at a 5.5% interest rate (or that they  Assume that if the rate of return on an 

could buy financial assets yielding 5.5% as an alternative to investing in new physical  investment equals the financing cost, the 

capital) and that economy­wide, total investment expenditures of the following 

magnitudes offer the corresponding profit rates:

Project expenditures (in  millions):

Expected rate of return:

 $100

10%

firm will go ahead and invest.

∙ Total investment spending= 100 + 200 +  150 + 50 + 100 = $600 

∙ Suppose firms could get financed at 4.5%  instead. What would investment spending  be now?

$200

9%

$150

8%

$50

7%

$100

6%

$250

5%

$300

4% and below

∙ Only invest if the return is larger than you would gain from an alternative financial asset

*14. The concept of liquidity

∙ An asset is liquid if it can quickly be turned into cash with relatively little loss of value  and illiquid if it cannot

*15. Crowding out of investment

∙ Crowding out occurs when a government budget deficit drives up the interest rate and  leads to reduced investment spending

∙ However, crowding out may not occur if the economy is depressed

16. The consumption function, including all related concepts, such as autonomous consumption,  the marginal propensity to consume, and the relationship between the MPC and the MPS ∙ The consumption function shows the relationship between total consumption spending in  the economy (C) and total disposable income (Yd), ceteris paribus

∙ Autonomous Consumption (A)­ Component of C that does not depend on disposable  income. This amount of consumption spending would occur if Yd were, hypothetically,  zero. A>0

o Financed through sales of previously accumulated assets to foreigners 

∙ Marginal Propensity to Consume (MPC)­ Amount by which C increases when Yd  increase $1

o MPC = ∆C/∆Yd 

o Or MPC * ∆Yd = ∆C 

o 0 < MPC < 1

∙  (1 – MPC) is Marginal Propensity to Save (MPS), or how much S rises with each $1  increase in Yd

∙ MPC+MPS= 1

17. What causes the consumption function to shift and in what direction

∙ Interest rates: If interest rates rise, saving becomes more attractive and consumption less attractive 

o Consumption function shifts left

∙ Household wealth (Stockpiles of previously accumulated assets): If household wealth  increases, then people will spend more on consumption

o Consumption function shifts right 

∙ Households’ expectations of their future economic prospects: If households become  more confident about the future, they will spend more today

o Consumption function shifts right

18. How to do calculations involving the consumption function, the MPC and the MPS ∙ Ex. Suppose that an increase in Yd from $100 billion to $110 billion causes C to increase  from $90 billion to $98 billion. What is MPC?

o MPC = 8/10 = .8

∙ Ex. Suppose that MPC = .75 and Yd falls by $20 billion. What will be the resulting  change in C? 

o Remember, MPC * ∆Yd =∆C 

o ∆C = .75 * ­20 = ­15 billion

∙ Ex. Suppose that MPC = .9 and C rose by $180 billion. What change in income caused  this?

o ∆Yd = 180/.9 = $200 billion

19. The saving function, including all related concepts, such as the MPS

∙ Remember, (1 – MPC) is Marginal Propensity to Save (MPS), or how much S rises with  each $1 increase in Yd

∙ MPS = ∆S/∆Yd = (1 – MPC) 

∙ Saving Function: S = ­A + (1 – MPC) Yd 

20. What causes the saving function to shift and in what direction

∙ Both the consumption function and the saving function are drawn ceteris paribus, so all  non­income determinants of C and S are being held constant.

∙ If one of these non­income determinants changes, then both C and S functions will shift  in opposite directions

∙ Ex. Suppose that household wealth rises, or households expect future income to rise or  interest rates to fall

o At each level of Yd, S is now lower (indicated by an downward shift)

21. How to do calculations involving the saving function, the MPS and the MPC ∙ MPS = ∆S/∆Yd = (1 – MPC) 

∙ Saving Function: S = ­A + (1 – MPC) Yd 

∙ MPC+MPS= 1

*22. The aggregate expenditure function, its slope, where it is positioned relative to the  consumption function, and the economic reason it slopes up

∙ AE= A+Ip+MPC*Y 

∙ Slope= MPC

∙ Parallel to the consumption function but shifted vertically by Ip 

∙ As Y rises, so does Yd, which causes C to rise, and in turn AE

23. The AE­Y graph and how to use it to find changes in inventories

∙ AE= C+Ip 

∙ GDP – AE = Change in Inventories 

∙ When production exceeds AE, inventories of unsold goods must be growing

∙ Iu = ∆Inventories = GDP – AE > 0

∙ If more is sold than produced, inventories shrink

∙ Iu = ∆Inventories, or unplanned investment

o GDP – AE < 0, meaning here it is negative

24. The equilibrium level of Y on the AE­Y graph and why national income and GDP tend to  gravitate toward equilibrium

∙ Macroeconomic equilibrium occurs on a graph at Ye and GDPe 

∙ At this level of production, total spending equals total production, so firms have no  incentive to change output levels

∙ This equilibrium is also a center of gravity for the economy. If the economy is operating  above it (at Y0), there are contradictory forces which pull Y, GDP and AE toward  equilibrium. The same goes for if the economy is operating below equilibrium

25. How to do calculations involving the AE equation, including how to calculate Ye, unplanned  investment, etc

∙ Ye = (A + Ip) / (1 – MPC) or Ye = AAE / MPS 

∙ Ex. Suppose C = 400 + .8Yd and Ip = $200. If real GDP and Y = 2000 o Ye = (400 + 200) / .2 = $3000

o So, C = 400 + .8Yd and Ip = $200 and Ye = $3000

26. Planned investment, unplanned investment and Gross Private Domestic Investment (I) ∙ Planned Investment (Ip)­ Firms’ purchases of newly produced capital equipment (and new home construction)

o It is a form of spending on firms’ output

∙ Unplanned Investment (Iu)­ Total changes in inventories in the economy

o It is not a form of spending on firms’ output­ in fact, it stems from a lack of  spending

o It is considered unplanned because firms cannot completely control it since it  depends, in part, on sales volumes

∙ Investment, in the sense of Gross Private Domestic Investment (I) = Ip+Iu 

27. What causes investment spending to change and in which direction

∙ Interest rates: if interest rates increase, then Ip decreases

∙ Business peoples’ expectations of the future (Positive expectations tend to increase  investment spending; whereas, negative expectations will do the opposite)

*28. How the circular flow diagram can be used to show the multiplier effect

Financial Sector C

S

Households AE= C + IP 

IP 

Firms (Produce GDP)

Y= C + S

Y GDP=Y

∙ If one component of AE falls by $100, then GDP will fall by $100, so Y will fall by  $100, making C fall by $100, so AE will fall again by $100*spending multiplier, causing  GDP to fall by $100*spending multiplier…etc.

*29. How the AE­Y graph can be used to show the multiplier effect

AE

AE = a + Ip + bY

AE` = a + Ip` + bY

A+Ip 

∆Ip 

A+Ip`

∆Ye

45⁰

Y

Y Y e 

e`

∙ Notice that the fall in Ye is much  larger than the fall in Ip, due to the  multiplier effect

30. How to do calculations involving the spending multiplier

∙ ∆Ye/∆AAE = 1/(1­MPC) = 1/MPS

31. The saving­investment graph

S, Ip 

32. Why the level of income where AE=GDP is the same level of income where S=Ip, ignoring  the macroeconomic impact of government and foreign trade

∙ S=Ip at Ye 

∙ So, S + C = Ip + C at Ye 

∙ Y=AE ; AE=GDP

*33. Why investment is self­financing, according to Keynesian economics, including the relevant graph and all causal connections

AE

AE`=a+Ip`+MPC*Y

AE=a+Ip+MPC*Y

a+Ip`

∙ A rise in investment  spending boosts AE,  which increases GDP,  which boosts Y, 

increasing S

a+Ip 

Y

Ye Ye`

*34. Full analysis of the paradox of thrift, including the relevant graph and all causal connections S, Ip 

S`

S

Ip 

Se=Se`

Y

Ye` Ye 

AE

AE=C+Ip 

∙ The thriftier population now has a  smaller income stream out of which  to save. There is no change in how  much they end up saving

∙ Note: if “induced investment” were  present (Ip rose as the current level of  GDP and Y rose), then saving would  end up falling

∙ Recall that AE = MPC

o New consumption 

denoted C`

AE`=C`+Ip

Y

Ye Ye`

(Some definitions used are derived both from notes taken in class and the required class textbook Krugman and  Wells’ Macroeconomics Fourth Edition)

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here