×
Log in to StudySoup

Forgot password? Reset password here

Penn State - MICRB 201 - Micro 201 Exam 3 Study Guide - Study Guide

Created by: Swapna Vasudevan Elite Notetaker

Schools > Pennsylvania State University > Microbiology > MICRB 201 > Penn State - MICRB 201 - Micro 201 Exam 3 Study Guide - Study Guide

Penn State - MICRB 201 - Micro 201 Exam 3 Study Guide - Study Guide

School: Pennsylvania State University
Department: Microbiology
Course: Introductory Microbiology
Professor: Olanrewaju Sodeinde
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Name: Micro 201 Exam 3 Study Guide
Description: These notes cover in detail from outside research and in-class notes on the material for exam 3.
Uploaded: 03/26/2018
This preview shows pages 1 - 3 of a 7 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image MICRO 201 EXAM 3 REVIEW I. DNA Replication and DNA Polymerase A. Key Points of DNA Replication 1. DNA replication is  semiconservative. Each strand in the double  helix acts as a template for synthesis of a new, complementary  strand. 2. New DNA is made by enzymes called  DNA polymerases, which  require a template and a  primer (starter) and synthesize DNA in  the 5' to 3' direction. 3. DNA replication requires  DNA polymerase, DNA primase, DNA  helicase, DNA ligase, and topoisomerase. 4. DNA is an antiparallel double helix of phosphodiester­linked  nucleotides paired specifically via hydrogen bonds 5. Key Structures 1. Polynucleotide 2. Double­stranded
3. Base pairing via H bonds
4. Antiparallel helix­ each strand has polarity
5. Phosphodiester backbone on the outside and base pairs on 
the inside of the helix 1. Double helix structure 6. DNA is synthesized in the  5’ to the 3’ direction 7. Hydrogen bonds determine base pairs 1. G:C: stronger, 3 bonds 2. A:T: weaker, 2 bonds B. Nucleotides are monomers that polymerize to make nucleic acids (DNA & RNA) a. N­glycosidic bond to various bases at C1
b. ­OH or ­H: ribose or deoxyribose at C2
c. ­OH phosphate ester to form nucleic acids at C3 (Makes Backbone
w gamma phosphate) d. Link to ring O C4 e. Phosphate ester to alpha, beta, gamma phosphates (mono­, di­, tri­ phosphates) C5 C. Ribose is a 5C monosaccharide
D. Eukaryotic DNA and Replication
a. Linear chromosomes  1. >10^8 bp, must have multiple origins  1. Origin Recognition Complex (ORC)  b. Only a tiny fraction of DNA encodes for protein ( introns vs.  exons) 1. Only about 5% of the human genome encodes for proteins 
background image 3. Packaged in highly organized structures that dramatically differ  throughout the cell cycle 1. Interphase: chromosomes are replicated (S phase) and are  barely visible in powerful microscopes 2. M phase: chromosomes condense so that they can be  delivered to daughter cells after cell division ­  chromosomes are markedly visible in microscope 3. Unique features: telomeres, origins of replication (multiple),  and centromeres 3. Three DNA structures are required for the inheritance of  eukaryotic chromosomes:  telomere, replication origin,  centromere 3. Eukaryotic DNA coils around  histones into nucleosomes which  coil into  chromatin which loop and coil into chromosomes  1. Histones­ major packing proteins that are lysine and  arginine rich (positively charged due to amino groups)    the protein component of chromatin  1. Assemble into octamers with 8 subunits, DNA  wraps around two times  2. H1 (linker), H2A, H2A, H2B (bead) H2B (bead),  H3, H3, H4, H4 1. Octamer formed from the 8 not including  H1 2. Cell doubles the amount of histones during  replication  3. Histone subunits are produced before and during  DNA synthesis 2. Nucleosome: “beads” 1. Histone octamer and 147 bp of DNA wrapped  around 2. ~50 bp linker b/w adjacent nucleosomes (the string)
3. Strong electrostatic attraction causes DNA to 
associate with histones  4. Nucleosomes will dissociate under high salt  concentrations (histones have positive charge) 5. Nucleosomes coil into chromatin, which can exist in different forms that have different levels of gene 
expression
1. Gene expression can be regulated by  covalent modifications to histones that  change the steric accessibility of DNA 2. Chromatin is  equal proportions DNA and protein  (histones) by mass
background image 1. Gene expression can be regulated via covalent  modifications to histones that change the steric  accessibility of DNA 2. Over 3 meters of DNA in each nucleus that is only  5 micrometers across 3. Chromatin, when viewed under EM   looks like  beads on a string  4. Histones = protein component of chromatin c. Vertical gene transfer, no horizontal gene transfer
c. Most of the DNA is in the nucleus­ mitochondria and chloroplast 
DNA is not 1. Mitochondria and chloroplast DNA are circular c. Number and size of Chromosomes varies widely among different  organisms c. Euchromatin: less dense, ready to be replicated and therefore be  expressed more  c. Heterochromatin: more electron dense, inside of the nuclear  lamina, does not undergo replication and therefore is not  expressed/expressed less  E. Prokaryotic DNA and Replication 1. Supercoils  due to DNA binding proteins to form loop domains 1. Allows for compaction to fit into the nucleoid  2. Two types of DNA 1. Chromosomes 1. Circular 1. Covalently closed 
2. ~10^6 bp
3. Only one origin of replication 1. “Ori”­ replication is initiated by  binding  2. 1­3 million bp 2. Plasmids­ much smaller than chromosomes 1. Circular 2. 1000­10,000 bp
3. ~100­1000 of copies
4. There are transporters that can bring outside  plasmids into the cell ii. DNA is in the nucleoid (both the chromosome and plasmids) iii. Only difference from generation to generation is some errors in  replication iv. Horizontal gene transfer can happen in ALL prokaryotes­ allows  for obtaining genetic diversity  F. Steps of DNA Replication

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Pennsylvania State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
7 Pages 52 Views 41 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Pennsylvania State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Pennsylvania State University
Department: Microbiology
Course: Introductory Microbiology
Professor: Olanrewaju Sodeinde
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Name: Micro 201 Exam 3 Study Guide
Description: These notes cover in detail from outside research and in-class notes on the material for exam 3.
Uploaded: 03/26/2018
7 Pages 52 Views 41 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Penn State - MICRB 201 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here