×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to OU - Communication 2003 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to OU - Communication 2003 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

OU / Communications / COMM 2003 / What are the five factors affecting tempo?

What are the five factors affecting tempo?

What are the five factors affecting tempo?

Description

COMM 2003 EXAM 2 STUDY GUIDE


What are the five factors affecting tempo?



LEVINE BOOK:

∙ CHAPTER 1:

o Definition of tempo: the rate or speed of our activities, refers to the idea of the  pace of life

o Five factors affecting tempo:

 Economic well­being

∙ The faster a place’s economy, the faster its tempo

 Degree of industrialization

∙ The more developed the country, the less free time per day

 Population size

∙ Bigger cities have faster tempos If you want to learn more check out What is the difference between sex and gender?

 Climate

∙ Hotter places are slower

 Cultural values

∙ Individualistic cultures move faster than those that emphasize 


What are the five influences on psychological clock and their characteristics?



collectivism

∙ CHAPTER 2:

o Definition of duration: the speed of the clock itself

 The psychological clock is the one responsible for the perception of  duration

o Accuracy of time estimations:

 We usually underestimate passage of time

 Gender, Personality, Physical & Medical Differences in estimating time ∙ Males are more accurate  Don't forget about the age old question of When is the abbasid empire created?
We also discuss several other topics like What is the ratchet effect?

∙ Higher temperatures lead to slower time perceptions

∙ Extroverts are more accurate time estimators than are introverts

∙ Obese people are more accurate than normal weight people

∙ Heavy drug users tend to be more accurate than light drug users


How does the attention gate model work?



o Distortions:

 Experiences vs. remembered durations

∙ The now experience vs recalling the experience (what affects the 

perception is how the experience was)

o Pleasant things feel more recent (memorable)

o Unpleasant things feel longer (faded away, ex. It was 

unpleasant but it has passed)

o Key issues about time stretching and boredom Don't forget about the age old question of What is amendment ratification?

 Think of time as elastic

 When we are bored time feels slow and stretches

o Five influences on psychological clock and their characteristics We also discuss several other topics like What is export model?

 Pleasantness

∙ Time flies by when you’re having fun

 Degree of urgency

∙ The greater the urgency, the slower time passes

 Amount of activity

∙ Activity makes time seem to pass quicker

 Variety

∙ Greater variety makes time seem to move faster

 Time­free tasks

∙ Type of task and nature of skills involved affects the perceptions of duration Don't forget about the age old question of What is post testing?

∙ CHAPTER 4:

o Event time definition: activities are allowed to occur based on their own schedule (time is measured according to the duration of events)

 Characteristics:

∙ Polychronic time (fluid time/island time)

∙ Activities are allowed to occur based on their own schedule/natural pace

∙ Cyclical time – orientation

o Clock time definition: activities are scheduled based on the hour on the clock (time = money)

 Characteristics:

∙ Monochronic time

∙ Time is valuable

∙ Linear time orientation

∙ Common phrases: “it’s not worth my time” “the early bird gets the  worm” “wasting time”

o Temporal flexibility

 Does M­time (clock) and P­time (event) mix well?

∙ M­time people tend to do better in m­time organizations, whereas 

P­time people tend to do better in P­time organizations

o M­time can undervalue human relations (don’t spend 

enough time getting to know our colleagues)

o P­time can bu unproductive (doing everything but the task 

at hand)

∙ CHAPTER 5:

o The waiting game:

 Increases stress and frustration for monochronic people

o Ten rules of waiting game:

 Rule 1: time is money

 Rule 2: waiting is regulated by the law of supply and demand

 Rule 3: we value what we wait for 

∙ Cognitive dissonance (if we are waiting for a long time, we will 

change our perception of what we are waiting for, before we may 

have not have cared BUT after waiting so long we will add more 

value to whatever we are waiting for) (if our actions don’t match 

our thoughts we will either change our actions or our thoughts)

 Rule 4: status dictates who waits

 Rule 5: the longer people will wait for you, the greater your status

 Rule 6: money buys a place in front

∙ Think Disney fast pass

 Rule 7: the more powerful control who waits

 Rule 8: waiting can be an effective instrument of control

∙ If you control someone else’s time that puts you in power and 

control over them

∙ Using waiting as a strategy to get control in a situation

 Rule 9: time can be given as a gift

∙ Giving your time to others

 Rule 10:  if you break into line, do it at the rear

∙ End of line has least organization

∙ CHAPTER 6:

o Studies on pace of life

 Main results (know the top and bottom 5 countries for overall pace of life) ∙ Fastest pace of life: Switzerland, Ireland, Germany, Japan, Italy

∙ Slowest pace of life: Mexico, Indonesia, Brazil, El Salvador, Syria ∙ Fastest walking speeds: Ireland, Netherlands, Switzerland, 

England, Germany

o Walking speed: the speed with which pedestrians in 

downtown areas walk a distance of 60 feet

 Conditions: major cities, clear summer days, during 

main business hours (morning rush), two locations 

on main downtown streets (two for reliability), flat 

unobstructed locations with broad sidewalks and 

sufficiently uncrowded, pedestrians walking alone, 

minimum of 35 walkers of each sex

∙ Fastest Work Speed: Germany, Switzerland, Ireland, Japan, 

Sweden

o Work speed: how quickly postal clerks complete a standard

request to purchase a stamp

 Note with standard request for a common stamp

 Elapsed time between handing the note and 

completion of the request

∙ Most Accurate clocks: Switzerland, Italy, Austria, Singapore, 

Romania

o Accuracy of public clocks: accuracy of 15 randomly 

selected bank clocks in main downtown areas in each city

 Comparison with the time reported by the phone 

company

 Pace of life in U.S.­ main results and regional differences (know the top  and bottom five cities as well as general findings regarding U.S. regions) ∙ Speedy Northeast: Boston, Buffalo, New York are the top cities

∙ Slowest Places: California cities

∙ “fast East Coast” and “slow West Coast”

∙ CHAPTER 7:

o Physical well­being

 People in faster paced places are more likely to have coronary heart  disease and have higher life satisfaction

 Individualistic nations have higher divorce rates but also higher marital  satisfaction rates

 Individualistic nations have higher suicide but also psychological well being rates

 Type A people

∙ Hurried pace of life defines them

∙ More likely to suffer from heart disease and have a heart attack

 Type A cities

∙ Personality level can be extended to urban/sociological level

∙ Faster places have higher rates of heart diseases deaths

o Psychological well­being

 Economic productivity is related to happiness

∙ Wealthier people are happier

∙ People in wealthier countries are happier

 People in faster places are more likely to be satisfied with their lives ∙ The relationship between economic vitality, individualism, and 

time urgency

o Social well­being

 Levine et al’s studies

∙ Dropped pen (does someone pick it up), hurt leg (does someone 

offer assistance) “blind” person crossing the street (how many are 

willing to help person cross the street)

o No gender differences; economic well­being/productivity 

predicted several helping behaviors negatively

∙ Levine’s results (know the top and bottom 5 helpful places as well 

as general findings regarding U.S. regions.)

o Most helpful: Rio de Janeiro, San Jose, Lilongwe, Calcutta,

Vienna

o Least Helpful: Kuala Lampur, New York, Singapore, 

Amsterdam, Sofia

 Most helpful cities: Rochester, NY; Lansing, MI; 

Nashville, TN

 Least helpful cities: New York, NY; Patterson, NJ; 

Los Angeles, CA

∙ CHAPTER 8:

o Characteristics of Japanese work ethic 

∙ 54 power

distance

46  

individualism

95  

masculinity

92 uncertainty  

avoidance

 Work quickly & a lot; work is life

 Collectivistic value system

∙ Workplace is family

 Obligation to others (Giri)

 Loyalty and devotion to the group

 Identification with one’s company 

 No clear line between time of work and play

 Coworkers as family members or friends

 Social support from coworkers

o The relationship between workload and health, and the term of karoshi  Japan is the exception in terms of heart disease: the fast pace of life does  NOT lead to increased rates of coronary heart disease; fifth lowest rate of  coronary heart disease

 Karoshi: death by overwork

∙ Japan has high suicide rates; approximately 25,000 cases in 2014 

(.02% of total population); most of them were men (wingfield

hayes, 2015); Japan is among the top five countries in this respect

HAMMOND CHAPTER:

∙ What affects our perception of time?

o Attention

o Emotions

o memory

∙ What does it mean to judge time prospectively or retrospectively?

o Prospectively

 Future oriented (ex. From now on, tell me when 10 minutes have passed) o Retrospectively

 Past oriented activity (ex. Come back and ask how long has it been (since  they left))

∙ What is the oddball effect and how does it work?

o When you see something new you end up focusing on it longer (even if it is  displayed for same amount of time)

 When something is new it captures our attention making us pay more  attention so it feels like it went by longer

∙ How does the attention gate model work?

o Theory is that we have a pacemaker which emits an endless series of pulses in the  brain, and a gate that allows our brain to count up every pulse that passes through  of pulses in the brain, and a gate that allows our brain to count up every pulse that passes through

 If you’re feeling anxious the pulses speed up, and so more pulses pass  through the gate within a given period causing you to believe that more 

time has passed than really did; time felt as though it slowed down (paying attention to time slows it down)

∙ What is the holiday paradox and how does it work?

o In the beginning everything goes by fast then when you look back it seems it was  so far away

LATANE & DARLEY:

∙ What is bystander apathy?

o Diffusion of responsibility; group settings affect and individual’s decision making in an emergency situation

∙ What do the results of the various studies presented demonstrate about how bystander  apathy works?

∙ Bystanders are less likely to intervene when there are others present than when they  are by themselves

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here