×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to AU - MKTG 3310 - Study Guide - Final
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to AU - MKTG 3310 - Study Guide - Final

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

AU / Marketing / MKTG 3310 / What is the importance of pricing?

What is the importance of pricing?

What is the importance of pricing?

Description

School: Auburn University
Department: Marketing
Course: Principles of Marketing
Professor: Jeremy wolter
Term: Fall 2015
Tags: MKTG, Marketing, Auburn University, business, and Wolter
Cost: 50
Name: MKTG 3310 Test 5 Study guide
Description: Study guide covering the 5th test in Wolter's mktg 3310. Includes demand curves, pricing strategies, and physcho pricing.
Uploaded: 04/13/2018
12 Pages 13 Views 17 Unlocks
Reviews


MKTG3310 - SECTION 5 IN REVIEW


What is the importance of pricing?



Value acquisition through pricing

“The moment you make a mistake in pricing, you're eating into your reputation or your profits.” ­  Katharine Paine 

“If you’ve got the power to raise prices without losing business to a competitor, you’ve got a very good  business. And if you have to have a prayer session before raising the price by 10 percent, then you’ve got  a terrible business.” – Warren Buffett, CEO Berkshire Hathaway, Inc.

April 10th: Demand Curves (Appendix 1)

∙ What is a price?

∙ The money charged for a product, or the sum of all the values that 

customers exchange for the benefits of having or using the product

o Why is pricing so important? (think the value equation)


What are the four types of markets?



∙ Pricing is the reflection of everything you do as a business

∙ What are the 4 types of markets we discussed and how do they relate to a firm’s pricing power?  ∙ Pure competition 

o the market consists of many buyers and sellers trading in a 

uniform commodity, such as wheat, copper, or financial  Don't forget about the age old question of who argued that women's subjugation coincided with the rise of private property during industrialization?

securities. No single buyer or seller has much effect on the going

market price. Thus, sellers in these markets do not spend much 

time on marketing strategy

o Good example is farmers. They have no specific control over the

price they can charge for their harvest, there is just a market 

price they have to meet

∙ Monopolistic competition


How does price elasticity affect a demand curve?



o the market consists of many buyers and sellers who trade over a 

range of prices because sellers can differentiate their offers to 

buyers.

o Good example of this is bars or nightclubs, dry cleaners, coffee 

shops, hotels, etc..

∙ Oligopolistic competition

o  the market consists of only a few large sellers. For example, 

only four companies—Verizon, AT&T, Sprint, and T­Mobile—

control more than 90 percent of the U.S. wireless service 

provider market. Each seller is alert and responsive to 

competitors’ pricing strategies and marketing moves.

∙ Pure monopoly We also discuss several other topics like econ 2013 mc

o the market is dominated by one seller. The seller may be a 

government monopoly (the U.S. Postal Service), a private 

regulated monopoly (a power company), or a private unregulated

monopoly (De Beers and diamonds). Pricing is handled 

differently in each case.

∙ (This information is near the end of chapter 10).

∙ What is a demand curve?

∙ Curve that shows the relationship between the price of a product and the 

quantity of the product demanded

o What are the assumptions of the demand curve?

∙ Ceteris paribus (“all else equal” condition)

o Requirement that when analyzing the relationship between 2 

variables—such as price and quantity demanded—other 

variables must be held constant

∙ Law of demand

o The rule that, holding everything else constant, when the price of

product falls, the quantity demanded of the product will increase,

and when the price of the product rises, the quantity demanded 

of the product will decrease

∙ What is price elasticity? If you want to learn more check out cf 450 class notes

∙ Elasticity measures the responsiveness of demand to changes in price

o How does price elasticity affect a demand curve?

∙ Where the % change in demand is GREATER than the % change in price

—demand is elastic

∙ When the %change in demand is LESS than the % change in price— If you want to learn more check out What is paleozoic?

demand is inelastic

o What factors influence price elasticity?

∙ Substitutes

o Organ juice to apple juice. Demand becomes more elastic

∙ Necessities

o More elastic. Can’t do without it.

∙ % of disposable income Don't forget about the age old question of fwgw

o High then its elastic. Lower then its inelastic

o If I gave you a product and described the market, could you tell me whether it was most  likely elastic or not? 

o If I gave you an elasticity coefficient, could you tell me whether it was most likely elastic or not? 

∙ What is the difference between movement along a demand curve and moving (i.e., shifting) the  demand curve?

∙ As the price changes, a product moves along the demand curve, but a 

change in something other than price that affects the demand curve is 

shifting it.

o What are the aspects we discussed that shift a demand curve?

∙ Consumer income

o Normal goods will increase as income increases (clothing, 

vacation)

o Inferior goods will decrease as income increases (ramen noodles)

∙ Price of related goods

o Goods and services used together 

 Ex. Price of hot dog buns go up, then demand for hot  We also discuss several other topics like r___iiia___x

dog weenies will go down

∙ Consumer tastes

o If consumers’ tastes change, then they may buy more or less of a 

product

 Ex. Healthy eating trends

∙ Population and demographics

o Increase in # of people buying something will increase amount 

demanded

 Increase in elderly people will increase in purchase in 

health care.

∙ Expectations

o If consumers’ expect prices to change, they may buy more or 

less of the product

 Ex. Cash for clunkers­when the program started, the 

demand for cars went up because people were getting 

money for their old cars. After the program, demand 

went down to national lows. Ex.—rumor that we were 

going to run out of gas—prices and demand went up.

∙ Marketing

o Marketing always wants to shift demand curve to right

 It does this by participating in value creation, 

differentiation, brand equity, scaricity, etc.

o If I gave you a situation with a certain type of product or trend, could you tell me which  way a demand curve would shift? 

April 12th: Pricing Strategies (Chpt 10)

∙ Why is pricing so important when considering profitability?

∙ If you have the ability to increase your price, it is more profitable than 

any other element

o Pricing floor

 No profits below this price

o Pricing ceiling

 No demand above this price

∙ Stuff in the middle that affects pricing

o Competition and other external factors

 Competitors strategies and prices, marketing strategy, 

objective and mix. Nature of the market and demand.

∙ What is demand­based, cost­based, and competition­based pricing?

∙ Cost based pricing 

o Setting prices based on the costs of producing, distributing and 

selling the product plus a fair rate of return for the company’s 

effort and risk

 Ex. Construction workers and lawyers

∙ Value based pricing

o Using buyer’s perceptions of value as the key to pricing

 More of a market oriented (market concept) type of 

pricing. Part of the info you are gathering is taking into 

consideration what your customers would like to pay.

∙ Competition based pricing

o Setting prices based on competitor’s strategies, costs, prices, and 

market offerings

 We look at competitors and match it or try to make 

ourselves look better.

o What are the considerations in setting the price between a cost­based pricing versus a  value­based pricing (see Figure 10.1)?

∙ Cost based pricing approaches

o Markup (cost­plus)

 Adding a standard increase to the cost of a product

∙ Stores like publix or Walmart: they have too 

much inventory to try and figure out a demand 

curve for every product.

∙ Also is way too expensive for the vast types of 

products they sell.

o Experience curve

 Planned reduction of price for increased production

∙ Demand pricing

o Good value pricing

 Right combination of quality and good service at a fair 

price

o value added

 attaching services and features to a product to support 

higher prices

o EDLP pricing/ Hi­Low pricing

 Keeping prices at a standard low rate vs. discounting

o What is the sequence of steps for demand­based vs cost­based pricing? ∙ Cost based

o Design a good product

o Determine product cost

o Set prices based on cost

o Convince buyers of product value

∙ Value based pricing

o Access customers’ needs and value perception

o Set prices at to match customers’ perceived value

o Determine costs that can be incurred

o Design product to deliver desired value at target price

o What are the types of cost­based pricing and value­based pricing?

∙ Fixed costs

o Cost that do not vary with production or sales level

∙ Variable costs

o Vary directly with the level of production

∙ Total costs

o Sum of fixed and variable cost for any given level of production

∙ What is price discrimination?

∙ Charging different groups of customers different prices

o What is the purpose of price discrimination?

∙ To gain the most amount of revenue based on customer’s willingness to 

pay

o Know the three methods of price discrimination well. 

1. Allow customers at the bottom of demand curve pay less

a. Ex. Discounts, rebates, specials

b. K­marts bluelight special

2. Charging customers at the top of the demand curve more

a. Ex. Amazon, value­added pricing, freemium. 

3. Allows customers to pay exactly what they are willing

a. Radiohead’s rainbow album­ 60% of U.S. downloaded for free. But 

they made more money in digitals than their previous album because 

they weren’t pay a label.

b. Sidetracks coffee

o Why must firms be careful when price discriminating?

∙ Unfairness=attribution

o Are they just trying to make money? That’s it?

 Aka, attribution can be function of reputation

∙ Ex. Coke­ they were looking to increase prices 

based on the temp outside

o People found this to be shady and unfair

 What are the three determinants of negative attributions?

∙ Perceptions of excessive profit 

o in comparison to estimated costs or reference price

∙ Perceived immorality

o Deception. 

o Taking advantage of situation

∙ Inability to understand pricing strategy

o Inability to understand price changes

o Inability to estimate costs

o Inability to assess real value

 What does reputation have to do with this?

∙ If people believe that the pricing strategies are unfair, the company’s 

reputation will suffer

March 30th: Psychological Pricing (Lecture only)

∙ Be familiar with how consumers react to the following pricing phenomenon: o Odd/even

∙ odd vs. even number in pricing

o when we look at prices we are generally lazy

∙ We process the number to the left and ignore the

rest Ex. $24.99 looks $1 cheaper than $25

∙ Ex. $24.99 looks $1 cheaper than $25

o Decoys

∙ When given options, if you give people a slightly less attractive version  of an option, the original option looks significantly better.

o Ex. 3 options: option 1, 2, and 3. Option three is a more 

expensive/worse version of option 2, so it’s a decoy. Now the 

less expensive version of option 2 looks significantly better.

o Price placement

∙ Placing the price higher on the page. 

o we view it as higher in price. We naturally associate up as more. 

Higher magnitude. 

o We associate smaller with things positioned to the left, so the 

bottom left is the best placement of price.

o Price preciseness

∙ We associate preciseness with smaller numbers

o Thing sell better when prices are taken all the way to the decimal

o Priming

∙ When a stimulus object influences reactions to a post­stimulus object o Different social identities in different situations can be affected 

by products

o Pain of payment

∙ It is painful to give money away

o Companies try to distance themselves from the act of giving 

away money

 Ex. Removing the $ sign from receipts

MKTG3310 - SECTION 5 IN REVIEW

Value acquisition through pricing

“The moment you make a mistake in pricing, you're eating into your reputation or your profits.” ­  Katharine Paine 

“If you’ve got the power to raise prices without losing business to a competitor, you’ve got a very good  business. And if you have to have a prayer session before raising the price by 10 percent, then you’ve got  a terrible business.” – Warren Buffett, CEO Berkshire Hathaway, Inc.

April 10th: Demand Curves (Appendix 1)

∙ What is a price?

∙ The money charged for a product, or the sum of all the values that 

customers exchange for the benefits of having or using the product

o Why is pricing so important? (think the value equation)

∙ Pricing is the reflection of everything you do as a business

∙ What are the 4 types of markets we discussed and how do they relate to a firm’s pricing power?  ∙ Pure competition 

o the market consists of many buyers and sellers trading in a 

uniform commodity, such as wheat, copper, or financial 

securities. No single buyer or seller has much effect on the going

market price. Thus, sellers in these markets do not spend much 

time on marketing strategy

o Good example is farmers. They have no specific control over the

price they can charge for their harvest, there is just a market 

price they have to meet

∙ Monopolistic competition

o the market consists of many buyers and sellers who trade over a 

range of prices because sellers can differentiate their offers to 

buyers.

o Good example of this is bars or nightclubs, dry cleaners, coffee 

shops, hotels, etc..

∙ Oligopolistic competition

o  the market consists of only a few large sellers. For example, 

only four companies—Verizon, AT&T, Sprint, and T­Mobile—

control more than 90 percent of the U.S. wireless service 

provider market. Each seller is alert and responsive to 

competitors’ pricing strategies and marketing moves.

∙ Pure monopoly

o the market is dominated by one seller. The seller may be a 

government monopoly (the U.S. Postal Service), a private 

regulated monopoly (a power company), or a private unregulated

monopoly (De Beers and diamonds). Pricing is handled 

differently in each case.

∙ (This information is near the end of chapter 10).

∙ What is a demand curve?

∙ Curve that shows the relationship between the price of a product and the 

quantity of the product demanded

o What are the assumptions of the demand curve?

∙ Ceteris paribus (“all else equal” condition)

o Requirement that when analyzing the relationship between 2 

variables—such as price and quantity demanded—other 

variables must be held constant

∙ Law of demand

o The rule that, holding everything else constant, when the price of

product falls, the quantity demanded of the product will increase,

and when the price of the product rises, the quantity demanded 

of the product will decrease

∙ What is price elasticity?

∙ Elasticity measures the responsiveness of demand to changes in price

o How does price elasticity affect a demand curve?

∙ Where the % change in demand is GREATER than the % change in price

—demand is elastic

∙ When the %change in demand is LESS than the % change in price—

demand is inelastic

o What factors influence price elasticity?

∙ Substitutes

o Organ juice to apple juice. Demand becomes more elastic

∙ Necessities

o More elastic. Can’t do without it.

∙ % of disposable income

o High then its elastic. Lower then its inelastic

o If I gave you a product and described the market, could you tell me whether it was most  likely elastic or not? 

o If I gave you an elasticity coefficient, could you tell me whether it was most likely elastic or not? 

∙ What is the difference between movement along a demand curve and moving (i.e., shifting) the  demand curve?

∙ As the price changes, a product moves along the demand curve, but a 

change in something other than price that affects the demand curve is 

shifting it.

o What are the aspects we discussed that shift a demand curve?

∙ Consumer income

o Normal goods will increase as income increases (clothing, 

vacation)

o Inferior goods will decrease as income increases (ramen noodles)

∙ Price of related goods

o Goods and services used together 

 Ex. Price of hot dog buns go up, then demand for hot 

dog weenies will go down

∙ Consumer tastes

o If consumers’ tastes change, then they may buy more or less of a 

product

 Ex. Healthy eating trends

∙ Population and demographics

o Increase in # of people buying something will increase amount 

demanded

 Increase in elderly people will increase in purchase in 

health care.

∙ Expectations

o If consumers’ expect prices to change, they may buy more or 

less of the product

 Ex. Cash for clunkers­when the program started, the 

demand for cars went up because people were getting 

money for their old cars. After the program, demand 

went down to national lows. Ex.—rumor that we were 

going to run out of gas—prices and demand went up.

∙ Marketing

o Marketing always wants to shift demand curve to right

 It does this by participating in value creation, 

differentiation, brand equity, scaricity, etc.

o If I gave you a situation with a certain type of product or trend, could you tell me which  way a demand curve would shift? 

April 12th: Pricing Strategies (Chpt 10)

∙ Why is pricing so important when considering profitability?

∙ If you have the ability to increase your price, it is more profitable than 

any other element

o Pricing floor

 No profits below this price

o Pricing ceiling

 No demand above this price

∙ Stuff in the middle that affects pricing

o Competition and other external factors

 Competitors strategies and prices, marketing strategy, 

objective and mix. Nature of the market and demand.

∙ What is demand­based, cost­based, and competition­based pricing?

∙ Cost based pricing 

o Setting prices based on the costs of producing, distributing and 

selling the product plus a fair rate of return for the company’s 

effort and risk

 Ex. Construction workers and lawyers

∙ Value based pricing

o Using buyer’s perceptions of value as the key to pricing

 More of a market oriented (market concept) type of 

pricing. Part of the info you are gathering is taking into 

consideration what your customers would like to pay.

∙ Competition based pricing

o Setting prices based on competitor’s strategies, costs, prices, and 

market offerings

 We look at competitors and match it or try to make 

ourselves look better.

o What are the considerations in setting the price between a cost­based pricing versus a  value­based pricing (see Figure 10.1)?

∙ Cost based pricing approaches

o Markup (cost­plus)

 Adding a standard increase to the cost of a product

∙ Stores like publix or Walmart: they have too 

much inventory to try and figure out a demand 

curve for every product.

∙ Also is way too expensive for the vast types of 

products they sell.

o Experience curve

 Planned reduction of price for increased production

∙ Demand pricing

o Good value pricing

 Right combination of quality and good service at a fair 

price

o value added

 attaching services and features to a product to support 

higher prices

o EDLP pricing/ Hi­Low pricing

 Keeping prices at a standard low rate vs. discounting

o What is the sequence of steps for demand­based vs cost­based pricing? ∙ Cost based

o Design a good product

o Determine product cost

o Set prices based on cost

o Convince buyers of product value

∙ Value based pricing

o Access customers’ needs and value perception

o Set prices at to match customers’ perceived value

o Determine costs that can be incurred

o Design product to deliver desired value at target price

o What are the types of cost­based pricing and value­based pricing?

∙ Fixed costs

o Cost that do not vary with production or sales level

∙ Variable costs

o Vary directly with the level of production

∙ Total costs

o Sum of fixed and variable cost for any given level of production

∙ What is price discrimination?

∙ Charging different groups of customers different prices

o What is the purpose of price discrimination?

∙ To gain the most amount of revenue based on customer’s willingness to 

pay

o Know the three methods of price discrimination well. 

1. Allow customers at the bottom of demand curve pay less

a. Ex. Discounts, rebates, specials

b. K­marts bluelight special

2. Charging customers at the top of the demand curve more

a. Ex. Amazon, value­added pricing, freemium. 

3. Allows customers to pay exactly what they are willing

a. Radiohead’s rainbow album­ 60% of U.S. downloaded for free. But 

they made more money in digitals than their previous album because 

they weren’t pay a label.

b. Sidetracks coffee

o Why must firms be careful when price discriminating?

∙ Unfairness=attribution

o Are they just trying to make money? That’s it?

 Aka, attribution can be function of reputation

∙ Ex. Coke­ they were looking to increase prices 

based on the temp outside

o People found this to be shady and unfair

 What are the three determinants of negative attributions?

∙ Perceptions of excessive profit 

o in comparison to estimated costs or reference price

∙ Perceived immorality

o Deception. 

o Taking advantage of situation

∙ Inability to understand pricing strategy

o Inability to understand price changes

o Inability to estimate costs

o Inability to assess real value

 What does reputation have to do with this?

∙ If people believe that the pricing strategies are unfair, the company’s 

reputation will suffer

March 30th: Psychological Pricing (Lecture only)

∙ Be familiar with how consumers react to the following pricing phenomenon: o Odd/even

∙ odd vs. even number in pricing

o when we look at prices we are generally lazy

∙ We process the number to the left and ignore the

rest Ex. $24.99 looks $1 cheaper than $25

∙ Ex. $24.99 looks $1 cheaper than $25

o Decoys

∙ When given options, if you give people a slightly less attractive version  of an option, the original option looks significantly better.

o Ex. 3 options: option 1, 2, and 3. Option three is a more 

expensive/worse version of option 2, so it’s a decoy. Now the 

less expensive version of option 2 looks significantly better.

o Price placement

∙ Placing the price higher on the page. 

o we view it as higher in price. We naturally associate up as more. 

Higher magnitude. 

o We associate smaller with things positioned to the left, so the 

bottom left is the best placement of price.

o Price preciseness

∙ We associate preciseness with smaller numbers

o Thing sell better when prices are taken all the way to the decimal

o Priming

∙ When a stimulus object influences reactions to a post­stimulus object o Different social identities in different situations can be affected 

by products

o Pain of payment

∙ It is painful to give money away

o Companies try to distance themselves from the act of giving 

away money

 Ex. Removing the $ sign from receipts

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here