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UCONN - PNB 3251 - Study Guide - Final

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UCONN - PNB 3251 - Study Guide - Final

School: University of Connecticut
Department: Physiology
Course: Biology of the Brain
Professor: A. R. Filipovic
Term: Spring 2016
Tags:
Name: Exam 4 Study Guide
Description: Study Guide questions answered for exam 4
Uploaded: 04/23/2018
0 5 3 77 Reviews
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background image Learning and Memory:  1) Describe the difference between ontogenetic and phylogenetic memory.   Ontogenetic memory is acquired through development and experience one 
makes during a lifespan. Phylogenetic memory is acquired through natural 
selection and the experience of a species (innate memory).  
2)​ ​ Describe the inter-relationships between the temporal categories of memory.   Immediate memory occurs first then it can be turned to short term and finally 
processed into long term.  
3) ​ Compare and contrast declarative and non-declarative memory, give specific  examples.   Declarative memory is conscious storage and retrieval of material and is 
composed of semantic and episodic memory. Processing of information involves 
encoding → storage → consolidation → retrieval. Non-declarative memory is 
storage and retrieval that is unconscious and includes priming, procedural, 
associative and nonassociative learning.  
4) What is the difference between semantic and episodic declarative memory.   Semantic memory consists of facts and knowledge about the world.   Episodic memory is scene of events or episodes.   5)​  What is the role of priming in implicit memory?  Allows for better recall of the words that were previously presented to the 
implicit mind.  
6) Describe Patient HM’s memory deficits. What functions were spared? What does 
the case of Patient HM teach us about the nature of memory?  
HM had anterograde amnesia so he couldn’t form new memories. His memory 
span for new memories was about 20 seconds.  
HM had normal function of short term, retrograde long-term memory, and 
semantic memory. His personality, social perception, learning ability, and IQ 
stayed the same.  
I​ t showed​  us that retrograde and retrograde amnesia were caused by different  anatomical areas in the brain.  7) What may underlie the ability of HM to learn a skilled movement, yet have no 
memory of having done so?  
Implicit and explicit memory occur in different areas of the brain. Procedural 
memory involves the striatum and since HM’s surgery didn’t involve the striatum, 
he was still able to learn a skill but not remember the event of him learning.  
8)​  Describe the relationship between the hippocampus and cortical association areas in  long-term storage of declarative memory.   Hippocampus process information to cortical areas associated with the type of 
memory it is storing. For example Wenicke’s area stores the meaning of words.  
background image 9) What is the evidence that forms of non-declarative memory depend on the striatum?   L-Dopa is a precursor for dopamine and dopamine is released into the striatum. 
Parkinson’s patient on L-Dopa performed better in the prediction task.  
10) How is space encoded by the hippocampus? How is it measured?   Place cells fire when they are in a particular point in space that the cell prefers.   11) What is the role of the medial entorhinal cortex in representing space?  Grid cells input to the hippocampus a fire at different areas in space creating a 
grid-like pattern. They represent local space as a Euclidean map and allows for a 
means of navigation in an environment.  
 
Synaptic Plasticity: 
1) Explain Hebb's postulate (1949) and its impact on the cellular basis of 
learning and memory in the brain. 
Hebb explained that synapses are strengthened during memory and 
learning.  
2) Describe the pre- and postsynaptic structures of excitatory, glutamatergic 
synapses  
The postsynaptic structure is a massive supramolecular complex 
consisting of glutamate receptors and various proteins (signaling, 
cell-adhesions, & structural). Dendritic spines are a postsynaptic structure 
specialization of excitatory synapses. The presynaptic structure consists of 
axonal boutons.  
3) What are the cellular mechanisms that account for two forms of short-term 
synaptic plasticity?  
Facilitation- increase in synaptic strength with an increase in presynaptic 
calcium.  
Depression- decrease in synaptic strength with a depletion of presynaptic 
NT.  
4) Describe Bliss and Lomo's LTP experiment (1973)    The experiment recorded the extracellular field around dentate granule 
cells which responded to stimulation of the perforant path.  
5) Name five differences between Bliss and Lomo's LTP experiment and classic 
SC CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cell LTP in slices  
6) Describe two ways in which LTP can be induced in a slice.  
Pairing pre and postsynaptic activity in slices or by stimulating Schaffer 
collaterals on the CA1 pathway.  

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School: University of Connecticut
Department: Physiology
Course: Biology of the Brain
Professor: A. R. Filipovic
Term: Spring 2016
Tags:
Name: Exam 4 Study Guide
Description: Study Guide questions answered for exam 4
Uploaded: 04/23/2018
8 Pages 45 Views 36 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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