×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UA - AC 210 - Study Guide - Final
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UA - AC 210 - Study Guide - Final

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UA / Accounting / AC 210 / A detailed schedule showing the expected sales for the budget period.

A detailed schedule showing the expected sales for the budget period.

A detailed schedule showing the expected sales for the budget period.

Description

School: University of Alabama - Tuscaloosa
Department: Accounting
Course: Intro to Accounting
Professor: Lisa mckinney
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: Math, business, and Accounting
Cost: 50
Name: AC 210 Final Study Guide
Description: Chapters 9-12 and Chapter 8 (managerial accounting). Budgeting terms, cash flows, depreciation, fixed asset ratio, gain (loss) on disposal, impairment loss, issued stocks, outstanding stocks, treasury stocks, preferred stocks, indirect method, current liabilities, current assets, operating, financing, and investing activities.
Uploaded: 04/27/2018
26 Pages 12 Views 7 Unlocks
Reviews


AC 210 Study Guide


A detailed schedule showing the expected sales for the budget period.



Chapter 8 (Managerial)

∙ Budget: a detailed plan for the future that is usually expressed in formal quantitative  terms.

∙ Responsibility Accounting: managers should be held responsible for those items ­ and  only those items ­ that they can actually control to a significant extent. Responsibility  accounting enables organizations to react quickly to deviations from their plans and to  learn from feedback.

∙ Master budget: Consists of a number of separate but interdependent budgets that formally lay out the company’s sales, production, and financial goals

∙ The sales forecast is the starting point in budgeting because sales impacts/ drives  virtually every aspect of a firm's activities. It determines the production budget, cash  collections, cash disbursements, selling and administrative budget that in turn determine  the cash budget and budgeted income statement and balance sheet.


What is intangible assets?



o Sales Budget: a detailed schedule showing the expected sales for the budget  period. An accurate sales budget is key for the entire sales budget process. It is  based on the company’s sales forecast.

∙ Self­imposed budget: a method of preparing budget in which managers prepare their own budgets. These Budgets are then reviewed by higher­level managers, and any issues are  resolved by agreement

∙ Production budget: it is prepared after the Sales Budget and lists the number of units that  must be produced to satisfy sales need and to provide for the desired ending finished  goods inventory

Chapter 9

Tangible Assets:

∙ Tangible Assets: are long­lived assets that have physical substance If you want to learn more check out cinnal

o Fixed assets: often fixed in place such as plant, property, and equipment o Acquisition Tangible Assets: all reasonable and necessary costs to acquire and  prepare an asset for use should be recorded as a cost of the asset. It has a  significant impact on the balance sheet (increases assets) and income statement  (decreases expenses).


Expenditures for routine maintenance and up­keeping.



 Land: is never used up (indefinite life)

 Ex. purchase cost, legal fees, survey fees, etc.

 Equipment

 Purchase/construction cost, sales taxes, transportation cost, 

installation cost

 Buildings

 Purchase/construction cost, legal fees, appraisal fees, architect fees

o Cost have been capitalized when they are recorded as assets

Intangible Assets:

∙ Intangible Assets: long­lived noncurrent assets have special rights but no physical  substance. Costs of intangible assets are recorded as assets only if they have been  purchased. If you want to learn more check out nsci class

o Acquisition Intangible Assets (Limited Life): usually have no value at the end of  their useful life

 Patents

 Copyrights

 Licensing rights

 Franchises

 Use the straight­line method to calculate amortization

 Amortization: is similar to depreciation and is recorded as an 

expense on the income statement and accumulated on the balance 

sheet

o Acquisition Intangible Assets (Unlimited Life):

 Goodwill

 Trademark

∙ Types:

o Trademarks: is a special name, image, or slogan

o Copyrights: gives the owner the exclusive right to publish, use, and sell a literary,  musical, or dramatic work over a period not exceeding 70 years after the author’s  death

o Patents: is an exclusive right granted by the federal government to the patent  owner prevents others from using, manufacturing, or selling the patent item for 20 years

o Technology: tech. assets include software and web development work o Licensing rights: are limited permissions to use something according to specific  terms and conditions

o Franchises: is a contractual right to sell certain products or services, use certain  trademarks, or perform activities in a geographical region

o Goodwill: most frequently reported intangible asset. GAAP does not allow it to be reported as an intangible asset on the balance sheet unless it has been purchased  from another company. We also discuss several other topics like What is the Molarity and Molality?

o Research and Development: when an intangible asset is being self­constructed or  internally developed, it is recorded as an expense

∙ Ordinary repairs and maintenance: expenditures for routine maintenance and up­keeping.  These cost occur frequently, so there are recorded as expenses. They are sometimes  called revenue expenditures because they are matched with revenue

∙ Extraordinary repairs and maintenance: occur infrequently, and involve large  expenditures and increases an asset’s usefulness through enhanced efficiency, capacity,  or lifespan. They are added to the appropriate long­lived asset because they increase the  usefulness of the tangible asset beyond its original condition. Therefore, they are called  capitalized expenditures

∙ Additions: increase productivity, may extend useful life, or improvement or expansion  should be capitalized

Depreciation Expense:

∙ Depreciation expense is calculated every period that buildings and equipment are used to  generate revenue. This decrease in assets creates an expense. 

o Accounts: Accumulated Depreciation (balance sheet) and Depreciation Expense  (income statement)

o Depreciation: is the allocation of existing costs that were already recorded as  long­lived assets

o Depreciable cost: the difference between the asset’s cost and residual value ∙ Accumulation over several periods

∙ Book (carrying) value: is the difference between the a tangible asset (property or  Equipment) costs and its appropriate accumulated depreciation

∙ 3 items are needed to calculate depreciation:

o Asset cost: including its capitalized costs, sales taxes, legal fees, and others that  were used to prepare the asset for use. If you want to learn more check out linear algebra umass

o Useful life: estimate of economic life. Usually expressed in years or hours.  However, land is the only tangible asset that assumed to have an indefinite life.  Therefore, land is not depreciated.

o Residual (salvage) value: estimate of the amount the company will receive when  it disposes of the asset.

∙ 3 Depreciation Methods:

o Straight­line: when the usage is the same each period, so yearly cost

(cost−residual value)∗(1 

useful life )=yearly dep. expense 

o Units­of­production: when usage varies each period

( cost−residual value)∗actual production this period

estimated total production=dep .expense

o Declining­balance: when the asset is more efficient (generate more revenues) in  early years, but less over time, also used for tax

 Note: The depreciation expense will not be recorded if the asset’s book 

value falls below its residual value. Therefore, for the final year, just 

enough depreciation is recorded to make the book value equal its residual 

value

(cost−acc .dep)∗(2 

useful life )=dep . expense 

Years:

Yearly Computation

Dep. 

Exp.

Cost

­

Acc. 

Dep.

=

Book Value

At Acquisition

62,50

0

0

62500

Year 1

(62,500­0)*(2/3)

41,667

62,50

0

41,66

7

20,833

Year 2

(62,500­41,667)*(2/3)

13,889

62,50

0

55,55

6

6,944

Year 3

(62,500­55,556)*(2/3)

­

62,50

0

60,00

0

2,500

Total

60,000

∙ The straight­line method is the preferred choice because it is easier to use and  understand. Also, it does a good job matching depreciation expenses to revenues when  assets are used evenly over their useful lives. Declining­balance applies best to assets  that ae most productive when they are new but quickly lose their usefulness as they get  older. Don't forget about the age old question of han 200 stony brook

Impairment:

∙ Impairment: occurs when events or changed circumstances interfere with a company’s  ability to recover the value of the asset through future operations If you want to learn more check out pols 2312 uta exam 1

o Occurs when the cash to be generated by an asset is estimated to be less than the  carrying value of that asset.

o If this occurs, the book value should be written down to what the asset is worth  (fair value) with the amount of the write­down reported as an impairment loss. o Accounts: Loss of Impairment (debited like an expense) and Equipment/Buildings (credit)

 It decreases stock holder’s equity and assets

o Example: book value for an amusement park ride equals $30 million; fair value is  equal to $5 million. Impairment loss is: $30 million ­ $5 million= $25 million

Disposal of Tangible Assets:

∙ When a business voluntarily decides not to hold a long­term asset for its entire life either because they discontinued a product, trades it in for a new asset, or retired it to the  junkyard.

∙ Gain on disposal (credited and increases Stockholder’s equity): is when Cash is greater  than the book value

∙ Loss on disposal (debited and decreases Stockholder’s equity):is then Cash is less than the book value

Proceeds (sale of asset)

50,000

­Book value of asset sold

(cost of asset)

100,000

Add: Accumulated Depreciation

(60,000)

(40,000)

Gain (loss) on disposal

10,000

o Accounts debited: Equipment, Acc. Depreciation, Cash (Loss on Disposal) o Accounts credited: Gain on disposal

Turnover Ratio:

∙ Fixed asset turnover ratio: indicates dollars of revenue generated for each dollar invested  in fixed assets (long­lived tangible assets)

o Higher ratio implies greater efficiency

Average Net

Net Revenue

¿Assets ¿

Chapter 10

Current Liabilities:

∙ Current liabilities: short­term obligations that will be paid or fulfilled within the  company’s current operating cycle or within one year of the balance sheet date o Salaries and Wages Payable:

o Accounts Payable (interest free, unless they become overdue)

o Accrued Liabilities: relate to various unpaid expenses, including advertising, and  income tax, interest payroll tax, and warranties

 Accrued Payroll: payroll deductions and employer payroll taxes

 Deductions are amounts subtracted from employees’ gross 

earnings to determine net pay. Example: FICA, income tax, and 

charitable donations

 Gross earnings: time worked * pay rate

 Net pay: gross earnings (minus) payroll deductions

 Payroll deductions create current liabilities for your employer

 Payroll deductions are required by lay or voluntarily requested by 

employees

 Employer Payroll Taxes: FICA (Federal Insurance Contributions Act) and  unemployment taxes

 Accrued Income Taxes: IRS form 1120

o Sales Tax Payable: companies are required to charge sales tax in all but 5 states  Accounts: Cash, Sales Tax Payable, and Sales Revenue

 Price of good plus the percentage of the tax equals total cash received  from that transaction

o Notes Payable: the amount a company owes as a result from issuing promissory  notes

Interest( I )=Principal ( P)∗Interest Rate ( R)∗Time (T)

 Establish note payable: sign a note and receive cash. Accounts: note 

payable (credited) and cash (debited)

 Accrued interest, but not yet paid. Accounts: interest expense (debited)  and interest payable (credited)

 Record interest paid: paying off the interest. Accounts: cash (credited) and interest payable (debited)

 Record principal paid: paying off the note. Accounts: cash (credited) and  notes payable (debited)

o Unearned Revenue: receiving cash before providing a good or service the  customer

 Accounts: Unearned Revenue, Cash, and Service/Sale Revenue

∙ Measuring Liabilities:

1. Initial amount of the liability: each liability is recorded at the amount of cash a  creditor would accept to settle the liability immediately after a transaction or  event creates the liability

2. Additional amounts owed to the creditor: liabilities increase when whenever  additional obligations arise, by purchasing goods and services, receiving customer deposits, or incurring interest over time

3. Payments or services provided to the creditor: liabilities decrease whenever the  company makes a payment or provides services to the creditor

Terms Related to Bonds:

∙ Bonds(long­term liabilities or investment): financial instruments that outline the future  payments a company promises to make in exchange for receiving a sum of money now o Investor: they are more attractive because they  return higher interest rates  o Company: long­term liability

∙ Face value: the amount payable on the maturity date

∙ Maturity date: date the bond must be paid off

∙ Stated interest rate: the rate stated on the face of the bond that is used to compute interest  payments

∙ Bond issue price: the amount that investors in the market establish the issue price ∙ Present value: it determines the amount that one or more payments made in the future are  worthy today

∙ Effective rate:

∙ Premium: the amount by which the bond’s issue price exceeds its face value ∙ Discount: the amount by which a bond’s issue is less than its face value

Interest on Bonds Issued at a Premium:

∙ The bond issuer receives more cash on the issue date than it repays on the maturity date ∙ It is the reduction in the company’s cost of borrowing

∙ Bond Amortization: makes the Interest Expense smaller than the actual interest payment  and, at the same time, causes the balance in Premium on Bonds Payable to decline in  each period (446)

Interest on Bonds Issued as a Discount:

∙ The bond issuer receives less cash on the issue date than it repays on the maturity date ∙ It is the extra cost of borrowing, over and above each interest payment ∙ It causes Interest Expense to be more than the Interest payment and causes the Discount  on Bonds Payable to decrease each period

Bond Retirement:

∙ Retiring a bond early rather than on its maturity date

∙ Accounts: Cash, Bonds Payable, and Gain (Loss) on Bond Retirement

Contingent Liabilities:

∙ Potential liabilities that arise as a result of past transactions or events, but their ultimate  resolution depends (is contingent) on the future

∙ Their dependence  on a future event introduces a great deal of uncertainty Debt­to­Assets Ratio:

Total Liabilities

Total Assets

∙ The percentage of assets financed by creditors

∙ High ratio mean greater financial risks because assets are financed mainly by debt rather  than equity

Times Interest Earned Ratio (Fixed charge coverage ratio):

Net Income+ Interest exp .+ IncomeTax exp .

Interest Expense

∙ Determines whether a company is generating enough income to cover its interest expense ∙ Higher the number, the better the coverage

Chapter 11

Types of shares:

∙ Authorized: the maximum number of common shares that can be issued to the public ∙ Issued shares: owned by the stockholder or another, unless the company has repurchased  them

∙ Treasury stock: repurchased shares by the corporation

∙ Outstanding shares: shares owned by the stockholders

issued shares=outstanding shares+treasury stock

Corporate Ownership:

∙ Shares of stock can be purchased in small amounts. So it is simple to become an owner ∙ Ownership interest are transferable

∙ Stockholders are not liable for the corporation’s debts. So it provides limited liability Stockholder Benefits:

∙ Voting rights: 

∙ Dividends

∙ Residual claims

∙ Preemptive rights

Repurchase of Stock:

∙ It is called Treasury Stock

o Contra­stockholder’s equity account

o Increase (debit) and decrease (credit)

o Not an asset

o No voting rights or dividend rights

∙ It sends a signal to investors that the company itself believes its own stock is worth  acquiring

∙ They obtain shares that can be reissued as payment for purchases of other companies ∙ They obtain shares to reissue to employees as part of employee stock purchase plans ∙ They reduce the numbers of outstanding shares to increase per­share measures of  earnings and stock value

Preferred Stock:

∙ Allows different voting rights. Separates stock ownership from voting control ∙ Dividends on preferred stock, if any, may be paid at a fixed rate. This is attractive to  certain investors such as founders or retirees, who seek stable income from their  investments

∙ Preferred stock carries priority over common stock. Meaning, any dividends the  corporation declares must be paid to preferred stockholders before they can be paid to  common stock holders

Retained Earnings:

∙ The amount of equity that the company itself has generated for stockholders (through  profitable operations) but not yet distributed to them

∙ Decrease in Retained Earnings equals an increase in Common stock

∙ Stockholders equity account

Stock Splits:

∙ The total number of authorized shares is increased by a specified amount, such as 2­for­1 ∙ Cash is not affected

Stock Dividends:

∙ A dividend that distributes additional shares of a corporation’s own stock ∙ Not paid in cash, but additional shares of stock

∙ Stock dividends are recorded by transferring an amount from Retained Earnings to  contributed capital accounts

o Large dividend is recorded at par value: more than 25% of the company’s  outstanding stock

o Small dividend is recorded at market value: les the 25% of the company’s  outstanding stock

∙ They are issued:

o To lower the market price per share of stock

o To demonstrate commitment to stockholders while conserving cash during  difficult times

o To signal an expectation of significant future earnings

Earnings Per Share (EPS):

∙ The amount of income generated for each of common stock owned by stockholders ∙ A higher ratio means greater profitability

Avg .

Net Income−Preferred Dividends

¿of Common SharesOutstanding ¿

Return on Equity (ROE):

∙ The amount of income earned for each dollar of common stockholders’ equity ∙ A higher ratio means stockholders are likely to enjoy greater returns

Net Income−Preferred Dividends

Avg .Common Stockholders Equity

Price per Earning (P/E):

∙ How many times more than the current year’s earning investors are willing to pay for a  company’s common stock

∙ A high number means investors anticipate an improvement in the company’s future  results

Current Stock Price ( pershare)

earnings per share(annual )

Chapter 12

Statement of Cash Flows:

∙ It shows each major type of business activity that caused a company’s cash to increase or  decrease during the accounting period

∙ Cash is defined to include cash and cash equivalents

o Cash equivalents: short­term, highly liquid investments purchased within 3  months of maturity

 They are readily convertible to known amounts of cash

 Since they are so near maturity, their value is unlikely changed

∙ 3 classifications:

o Financing: exchanges of cash with stockholders and cash exchanges with lenders  (for principal on loans)

o Operating: cash inflows from operation and outflows related directly to the  revenues and expenses reported on the income statement

 Day­to­day business activities with customers, suppliers, employees, 

landlords, and others

o Investing: purchase and disposal of investments and long­lived assets

cash=liabilities+stockholders equity−noncash assets

change∈cash=change∈(liabilities+stockholders equity−noncashassets)

Indirect Method: Operating Activities

∙ Indirect: starts with the net income from the income statement and adjusts it by  eliminating the effects of items that do not involve cash (ex. depreciation) and including  items that do not have cash effects

Net Income

+

Depreciation

+

Decreases in current assets

­

Increases in current assets

­

Decreases in current liabilities

+

Increases in current liabilities

=

Net cash flow provided by (used in) operating activities

∙ Current assets:

o Cash and Cash Equivalents

o Accounts Receivable

o Inventory

o Prepaid expenses

∙ Current liabilities

o Account payable o Accrued liabilities

AC 210 Study Guide

Chapter 8 (Managerial)

∙ Budget: a detailed plan for the future that is usually expressed in formal quantitative  terms.

∙ Responsibility Accounting: managers should be held responsible for those items ­ and  only those items ­ that they can actually control to a significant extent. Responsibility  accounting enables organizations to react quickly to deviations from their plans and to  learn from feedback.

∙ Master budget: Consists of a number of separate but interdependent budgets that formally lay out the company’s sales, production, and financial goals

∙ The sales forecast is the starting point in budgeting because sales impacts/ drives  virtually every aspect of a firm's activities. It determines the production budget, cash  collections, cash disbursements, selling and administrative budget that in turn determine  the cash budget and budgeted income statement and balance sheet.

o Sales Budget: a detailed schedule showing the expected sales for the budget  period. An accurate sales budget is key for the entire sales budget process. It is  based on the company’s sales forecast.

∙ Self­imposed budget: a method of preparing budget in which managers prepare their own budgets. These Budgets are then reviewed by higher­level managers, and any issues are  resolved by agreement

∙ Production budget: it is prepared after the Sales Budget and lists the number of units that  must be produced to satisfy sales need and to provide for the desired ending finished  goods inventory

Chapter 9

Tangible Assets:

∙ Tangible Assets: are long­lived assets that have physical substance

o Fixed assets: often fixed in place such as plant, property, and equipment o Acquisition Tangible Assets: all reasonable and necessary costs to acquire and  prepare an asset for use should be recorded as a cost of the asset. It has a  significant impact on the balance sheet (increases assets) and income statement  (decreases expenses).

 Land: is never used up (indefinite life)

 Ex. purchase cost, legal fees, survey fees, etc.

 Equipment

 Purchase/construction cost, sales taxes, transportation cost, 

installation cost

 Buildings

 Purchase/construction cost, legal fees, appraisal fees, architect fees

o Cost have been capitalized when they are recorded as assets

Intangible Assets:

∙ Intangible Assets: long­lived noncurrent assets have special rights but no physical  substance. Costs of intangible assets are recorded as assets only if they have been  purchased.

o Acquisition Intangible Assets (Limited Life): usually have no value at the end of  their useful life

 Patents

 Copyrights

 Licensing rights

 Franchises

 Use the straight­line method to calculate amortization

 Amortization: is similar to depreciation and is recorded as an 

expense on the income statement and accumulated on the balance 

sheet

o Acquisition Intangible Assets (Unlimited Life):

 Goodwill

 Trademark

∙ Types:

o Trademarks: is a special name, image, or slogan

o Copyrights: gives the owner the exclusive right to publish, use, and sell a literary,  musical, or dramatic work over a period not exceeding 70 years after the author’s  death

o Patents: is an exclusive right granted by the federal government to the patent  owner prevents others from using, manufacturing, or selling the patent item for 20 years

o Technology: tech. assets include software and web development work o Licensing rights: are limited permissions to use something according to specific  terms and conditions

o Franchises: is a contractual right to sell certain products or services, use certain  trademarks, or perform activities in a geographical region

o Goodwill: most frequently reported intangible asset. GAAP does not allow it to be reported as an intangible asset on the balance sheet unless it has been purchased  from another company.

o Research and Development: when an intangible asset is being self­constructed or  internally developed, it is recorded as an expense

∙ Ordinary repairs and maintenance: expenditures for routine maintenance and up­keeping.  These cost occur frequently, so there are recorded as expenses. They are sometimes  called revenue expenditures because they are matched with revenue

∙ Extraordinary repairs and maintenance: occur infrequently, and involve large  expenditures and increases an asset’s usefulness through enhanced efficiency, capacity,  or lifespan. They are added to the appropriate long­lived asset because they increase the  usefulness of the tangible asset beyond its original condition. Therefore, they are called  capitalized expenditures

∙ Additions: increase productivity, may extend useful life, or improvement or expansion  should be capitalized

Depreciation Expense:

∙ Depreciation expense is calculated every period that buildings and equipment are used to  generate revenue. This decrease in assets creates an expense. 

o Accounts: Accumulated Depreciation (balance sheet) and Depreciation Expense  (income statement)

o Depreciation: is the allocation of existing costs that were already recorded as  long­lived assets

o Depreciable cost: the difference between the asset’s cost and residual value ∙ Accumulation over several periods

∙ Book (carrying) value: is the difference between the a tangible asset (property or  Equipment) costs and its appropriate accumulated depreciation

∙ 3 items are needed to calculate depreciation:

o Asset cost: including its capitalized costs, sales taxes, legal fees, and others that  were used to prepare the asset for use.

o Useful life: estimate of economic life. Usually expressed in years or hours.  However, land is the only tangible asset that assumed to have an indefinite life.  Therefore, land is not depreciated.

o Residual (salvage) value: estimate of the amount the company will receive when  it disposes of the asset.

∙ 3 Depreciation Methods:

o Straight­line: when the usage is the same each period, so yearly cost

(cost−residual value)∗(1 

useful life )=yearly dep. expense 

o Units­of­production: when usage varies each period

( cost−residual value)∗actual production this period

estimated total production=dep .expense

o Declining­balance: when the asset is more efficient (generate more revenues) in  early years, but less over time, also used for tax

 Note: The depreciation expense will not be recorded if the asset’s book 

value falls below its residual value. Therefore, for the final year, just 

enough depreciation is recorded to make the book value equal its residual 

value

(cost−acc .dep)∗(2 

useful life )=dep . expense 

Years:

Yearly Computation

Dep. 

Exp.

Cost

­

Acc. 

Dep.

=

Book Value

At Acquisition

62,50

0

0

62500

Year 1

(62,500­0)*(2/3)

41,667

62,50

0

41,66

7

20,833

Year 2

(62,500­41,667)*(2/3)

13,889

62,50

0

55,55

6

6,944

Year 3

(62,500­55,556)*(2/3)

­

62,50

0

60,00

0

2,500

Total

60,000

∙ The straight­line method is the preferred choice because it is easier to use and  understand. Also, it does a good job matching depreciation expenses to revenues when  assets are used evenly over their useful lives. Declining­balance applies best to assets  that ae most productive when they are new but quickly lose their usefulness as they get  older.

Impairment:

∙ Impairment: occurs when events or changed circumstances interfere with a company’s  ability to recover the value of the asset through future operations

o Occurs when the cash to be generated by an asset is estimated to be less than the  carrying value of that asset.

o If this occurs, the book value should be written down to what the asset is worth  (fair value) with the amount of the write­down reported as an impairment loss. o Accounts: Loss of Impairment (debited like an expense) and Equipment/Buildings (credit)

 It decreases stock holder’s equity and assets

o Example: book value for an amusement park ride equals $30 million; fair value is  equal to $5 million. Impairment loss is: $30 million ­ $5 million= $25 million

Disposal of Tangible Assets:

∙ When a business voluntarily decides not to hold a long­term asset for its entire life either because they discontinued a product, trades it in for a new asset, or retired it to the  junkyard.

∙ Gain on disposal (credited and increases Stockholder’s equity): is when Cash is greater  than the book value

∙ Loss on disposal (debited and decreases Stockholder’s equity):is then Cash is less than the book value

Proceeds (sale of asset)

50,000

­Book value of asset sold

(cost of asset)

100,000

Add: Accumulated Depreciation

(60,000)

(40,000)

Gain (loss) on disposal

10,000

o Accounts debited: Equipment, Acc. Depreciation, Cash (Loss on Disposal) o Accounts credited: Gain on disposal

Turnover Ratio:

∙ Fixed asset turnover ratio: indicates dollars of revenue generated for each dollar invested  in fixed assets (long­lived tangible assets)

o Higher ratio implies greater efficiency

Average Net

Net Revenue

¿Assets ¿

Chapter 10

Current Liabilities:

∙ Current liabilities: short­term obligations that will be paid or fulfilled within the  company’s current operating cycle or within one year of the balance sheet date o Salaries and Wages Payable:

o Accounts Payable (interest free, unless they become overdue)

o Accrued Liabilities: relate to various unpaid expenses, including advertising, and  income tax, interest payroll tax, and warranties

 Accrued Payroll: payroll deductions and employer payroll taxes

 Deductions are amounts subtracted from employees’ gross 

earnings to determine net pay. Example: FICA, income tax, and 

charitable donations

 Gross earnings: time worked * pay rate

 Net pay: gross earnings (minus) payroll deductions

 Payroll deductions create current liabilities for your employer

 Payroll deductions are required by lay or voluntarily requested by 

employees

 Employer Payroll Taxes: FICA (Federal Insurance Contributions Act) and  unemployment taxes

 Accrued Income Taxes: IRS form 1120

o Sales Tax Payable: companies are required to charge sales tax in all but 5 states  Accounts: Cash, Sales Tax Payable, and Sales Revenue

 Price of good plus the percentage of the tax equals total cash received  from that transaction

o Notes Payable: the amount a company owes as a result from issuing promissory  notes

Interest( I )=Principal ( P)∗Interest Rate ( R)∗Time (T)

 Establish note payable: sign a note and receive cash. Accounts: note 

payable (credited) and cash (debited)

 Accrued interest, but not yet paid. Accounts: interest expense (debited)  and interest payable (credited)

 Record interest paid: paying off the interest. Accounts: cash (credited) and interest payable (debited)

 Record principal paid: paying off the note. Accounts: cash (credited) and  notes payable (debited)

o Unearned Revenue: receiving cash before providing a good or service the  customer

 Accounts: Unearned Revenue, Cash, and Service/Sale Revenue

∙ Measuring Liabilities:

1. Initial amount of the liability: each liability is recorded at the amount of cash a  creditor would accept to settle the liability immediately after a transaction or  event creates the liability

2. Additional amounts owed to the creditor: liabilities increase when whenever  additional obligations arise, by purchasing goods and services, receiving customer deposits, or incurring interest over time

3. Payments or services provided to the creditor: liabilities decrease whenever the  company makes a payment or provides services to the creditor

Terms Related to Bonds:

∙ Bonds(long­term liabilities or investment): financial instruments that outline the future  payments a company promises to make in exchange for receiving a sum of money now o Investor: they are more attractive because they  return higher interest rates  o Company: long­term liability

∙ Face value: the amount payable on the maturity date

∙ Maturity date: date the bond must be paid off

∙ Stated interest rate: the rate stated on the face of the bond that is used to compute interest  payments

∙ Bond issue price: the amount that investors in the market establish the issue price ∙ Present value: it determines the amount that one or more payments made in the future are  worthy today

∙ Effective rate:

∙ Premium: the amount by which the bond’s issue price exceeds its face value ∙ Discount: the amount by which a bond’s issue is less than its face value

Interest on Bonds Issued at a Premium:

∙ The bond issuer receives more cash on the issue date than it repays on the maturity date ∙ It is the reduction in the company’s cost of borrowing

∙ Bond Amortization: makes the Interest Expense smaller than the actual interest payment  and, at the same time, causes the balance in Premium on Bonds Payable to decline in  each period (446)

Interest on Bonds Issued as a Discount:

∙ The bond issuer receives less cash on the issue date than it repays on the maturity date ∙ It is the extra cost of borrowing, over and above each interest payment ∙ It causes Interest Expense to be more than the Interest payment and causes the Discount  on Bonds Payable to decrease each period

Bond Retirement:

∙ Retiring a bond early rather than on its maturity date

∙ Accounts: Cash, Bonds Payable, and Gain (Loss) on Bond Retirement

Contingent Liabilities:

∙ Potential liabilities that arise as a result of past transactions or events, but their ultimate  resolution depends (is contingent) on the future

∙ Their dependence  on a future event introduces a great deal of uncertainty Debt­to­Assets Ratio:

Total Liabilities

Total Assets

∙ The percentage of assets financed by creditors

∙ High ratio mean greater financial risks because assets are financed mainly by debt rather  than equity

Times Interest Earned Ratio (Fixed charge coverage ratio):

Net Income+ Interest exp .+ IncomeTax exp .

Interest Expense

∙ Determines whether a company is generating enough income to cover its interest expense ∙ Higher the number, the better the coverage

Chapter 11

Types of shares:

∙ Authorized: the maximum number of common shares that can be issued to the public ∙ Issued shares: owned by the stockholder or another, unless the company has repurchased  them

∙ Treasury stock: repurchased shares by the corporation

∙ Outstanding shares: shares owned by the stockholders

issued shares=outstanding shares+treasury stock

Corporate Ownership:

∙ Shares of stock can be purchased in small amounts. So it is simple to become an owner ∙ Ownership interest are transferable

∙ Stockholders are not liable for the corporation’s debts. So it provides limited liability Stockholder Benefits:

∙ Voting rights: 

∙ Dividends

∙ Residual claims

∙ Preemptive rights

Repurchase of Stock:

∙ It is called Treasury Stock

o Contra­stockholder’s equity account

o Increase (debit) and decrease (credit)

o Not an asset

o No voting rights or dividend rights

∙ It sends a signal to investors that the company itself believes its own stock is worth  acquiring

∙ They obtain shares that can be reissued as payment for purchases of other companies ∙ They obtain shares to reissue to employees as part of employee stock purchase plans ∙ They reduce the numbers of outstanding shares to increase per­share measures of  earnings and stock value

Preferred Stock:

∙ Allows different voting rights. Separates stock ownership from voting control ∙ Dividends on preferred stock, if any, may be paid at a fixed rate. This is attractive to  certain investors such as founders or retirees, who seek stable income from their  investments

∙ Preferred stock carries priority over common stock. Meaning, any dividends the  corporation declares must be paid to preferred stockholders before they can be paid to  common stock holders

Retained Earnings:

∙ The amount of equity that the company itself has generated for stockholders (through  profitable operations) but not yet distributed to them

∙ Decrease in Retained Earnings equals an increase in Common stock

∙ Stockholders equity account

Stock Splits:

∙ The total number of authorized shares is increased by a specified amount, such as 2­for­1 ∙ Cash is not affected

Stock Dividends:

∙ A dividend that distributes additional shares of a corporation’s own stock ∙ Not paid in cash, but additional shares of stock

∙ Stock dividends are recorded by transferring an amount from Retained Earnings to  contributed capital accounts

o Large dividend is recorded at par value: more than 25% of the company’s  outstanding stock

o Small dividend is recorded at market value: les the 25% of the company’s  outstanding stock

∙ They are issued:

o To lower the market price per share of stock

o To demonstrate commitment to stockholders while conserving cash during  difficult times

o To signal an expectation of significant future earnings

Earnings Per Share (EPS):

∙ The amount of income generated for each of common stock owned by stockholders ∙ A higher ratio means greater profitability

Avg .

Net Income−Preferred Dividends

¿of Common SharesOutstanding ¿

Return on Equity (ROE):

∙ The amount of income earned for each dollar of common stockholders’ equity ∙ A higher ratio means stockholders are likely to enjoy greater returns

Net Income−Preferred Dividends

Avg .Common Stockholders Equity

Price per Earning (P/E):

∙ How many times more than the current year’s earning investors are willing to pay for a  company’s common stock

∙ A high number means investors anticipate an improvement in the company’s future  results

Current Stock Price ( pershare)

earnings per share(annual )

Chapter 12

Statement of Cash Flows:

∙ It shows each major type of business activity that caused a company’s cash to increase or  decrease during the accounting period

∙ Cash is defined to include cash and cash equivalents

o Cash equivalents: short­term, highly liquid investments purchased within 3  months of maturity

 They are readily convertible to known amounts of cash

 Since they are so near maturity, their value is unlikely changed

∙ 3 classifications:

o Financing: exchanges of cash with stockholders and cash exchanges with lenders  (for principal on loans)

o Operating: cash inflows from operation and outflows related directly to the  revenues and expenses reported on the income statement

 Day­to­day business activities with customers, suppliers, employees, 

landlords, and others

o Investing: purchase and disposal of investments and long­lived assets

cash=liabilities+stockholders equity−noncash assets

change∈cash=change∈(liabilities+stockholders equity−noncashassets)

Indirect Method: Operating Activities

∙ Indirect: starts with the net income from the income statement and adjusts it by  eliminating the effects of items that do not involve cash (ex. depreciation) and including  items that do not have cash effects

Net Income

+

Depreciation

+

Decreases in current assets

­

Increases in current assets

­

Decreases in current liabilities

+

Increases in current liabilities

=

Net cash flow provided by (used in) operating activities

∙ Current assets:

o Cash and Cash Equivalents

o Accounts Receivable

o Inventory

o Prepaid expenses

∙ Current liabilities

o Account payable o Accrued liabilities

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here