Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

BGSU - GEOG 1250 - GEOG FINAL STUDY GUIDE - Study Guide

Created by: Alaina Miller Elite Notetaker

> > > > BGSU - GEOG 1250 - GEOG FINAL STUDY GUIDE - Study Guide

BGSU - GEOG 1250 - GEOG FINAL STUDY GUIDE - Study Guide

School: Bowling Green State University
Department: Geography
Course: Weather and Climate
Professor: Marius Paulikas
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: GEOG and geography
Name: GEOG FINAL STUDY GUIDE
Description: These notes cover everything learned in class from the study guide.
Uploaded: 04/30/2018
This preview shows pages 1 - 5 of a 26 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image GEOG FINAL EXAM STUGY GUIDE Atmospheric Composition & Structure: 5.6 km rule of thumb >> pressure reduces by 50% every 5.6 km Atmospheric density and pressure go hand in hand o The higher the density, the higher the pressure exerted Formation of Current Atmosphere: o Volcanic Eruptions – released NITROGEN (most abundant element in atmos),  and WATER VAPOR (created lakes, rivers, oceans) o Photosynthesis – algae formed, generated their own food and released oxygen. Permanent Gases (%) ­ when atmospheric concentration remains the same everywhere 
in the world
o Nitrogen 78% o Oxygen 21% Variable Gases ­ when atmospheric concentration changes from place to place; 
correspond to greenhouse gases
Increase of greenhouse gases are able to absorb more energy, producing an
enhanced warming effect
Water vapor (0­4%)
Rainforest (warm, evaporation) – closer to 4%
Other variable gases = CO2, Ozone, Methane Carbon Dioxide – concentration for CO2 has increased over time o Urban locations see the highest concentrations o IF VEGETATION IS DORMANT = BUILD UP OF CO2 o SUMMERTIME = LOWER AMOUNTS OF CO2, more plants digesting it Vertical Structure of Earth’s Atmosphere: o Troposphere ­  80% of the world’s weather occurs here; this layer constantly  overturns on itself, meaning the heat will rise and cold will sink, turning over on 
itself
o Stratosphere – smoother layer (encounter less turbulence in this layer); presence 
of the Ozone layer, which 
absorbs more of the harmful rays from the sun o Mesosphere ­  doesn’t absorb energy so much here because temp is decreasing  here; layer where meteors burn up here because there’s a greater amount of gas 
molecules (allowing the atmosphere to be dense enough), causing 
friction/heat  build­up
background image o Thermosphere ­has hottest gas molecules, but least amount of them (troposphere 
has the most); so although there are the hottest gas molecules in the thermosphere,
heat corresponds with the amount of energy, and less molecules = less energy, so 
this layer is freezing cold
The Seasons: We have seasons due to the 23.5 degree tilt of Earth’s axis. Solar Radiation and Seasons: o Conduction – energy being transferred by direct physical contact Ex. Surface can be hot, and the air directly around it will be hot too Greater energy transfers to items with lesser energy o Convection – energy being transferred in a fluid­like motion o Radiation – electromagnetic waves that do not require a molecular medium (solid, liquid, gas) Energy from the sun can travel through empty space Earth = emits longwaves (aka – Terrestrial) Sun = emits shortwaves (aka – Solar) >>> more energy!!! Stefan Boltzmann’s Law – the higher an objects temp, the greater the total amount of 
energy will be emitted.
Wien’s Law – the higher and object’s temp, the shorter the wavelength of primary 
emitted radiation
o Aka – shorter/more condensed wavelengths carry more energy. Energy Transfer Terms: o Reflection – corresponds to energy that’s redirected while not breaking down at  all (ex. Looking in a mirror) o Albedo – the reflectivity rate of an object (ex. Slows down warming) o Absorption – energy is consumed; temp of an object will go up; synonymous w/  energy consumption o Scattering – pertains to where energy strikes an object, breaks down & disperses o Transmission – energy passing through an object, without altering the energy in  its intensity or direction of travel (ex. light waves travelling down to Earth). The el nino Effect: o Gases that can absorb Radiation (then readmit it back out to space) Ex. sunrays heating the interior of your car to hotter than outside Shortwave radiation passes through greenhouse gases; the longwaves get 
absorbed
The Sun & The Seasons:
background image o The axis of the Earth determines temperature/energy amount (23.5 ° ) o Summer – June 21 o Winter – December 21 o Spring – March 21 (equinox date ­ 12 hours of daylight everywhere) o Fall – September 21 (equinox date – 12 hours of daylight everywhere) Lines of Latitude: o Arctic Circle – 66.5°N o Tropic of Cancer – 23.5°N (hits on June 21) o Equator ­ 0° (hits on sept 21, then March 21) o Tropic of Capricorn – 23.5°S (hits on Dec 21) o Antarctic Circle – 66.5°S Three Rules of Thumb: o The hemisphere in which the overhead sun is located will be experiencing the  warm season. o The hemisphere that has the warm season, the highest latitude of that hemisphere  will be having the longest days on the planet. o The conditions of the northern and southern hemispheres will be direct opposites  of each other. Sun/Zenith Angles: o Sun angle + zenith angle = 90° o To get a Zenith Angle of 90 degrees, the sun will have to be on the horizon (not  overhead like you may think), and this occurs at the Arctic Circle o The furthest southern extent a sun angle will equal 90 degrees is the Tropic of  Capricorn; furthest northern will be Tropic of Cancer Length of Daylight: o Beam Spreading – when sun is directly overhead, the light is more concentrated  into one area, which is why there’s more intense heat at equator.  in other words, increase in surface area of radiation due to decrease in 
solar/sun angle; when sun is rising/setting, the sun hits the surface at an 
angle, dispersing the light resulting in less intense heat. 
o Atmospheric Beam Depletion – The amount of the atmosphere that sunlight must  penetrate to reach the Earth’s surface o Energy Redistribution –  More energy = warmer weather (equator) Less energy = cooler weather (poles) Energy imbalance results in air flow patterns, allowing for weather
background image Phase Changes of Water: o Ice > liquid = melting o Liquid > vapor = evaporation                      Greatest energy as a VAPOR o Ice > vapor = sublimation                    Medium energy as a LIQUID o Vapor > liquid = condensation                    Least energy as a SOLID o Liquid > ice = freezing o Vapor > ice = deposition          Sensible Heat vs. Latent Heat: o Sensible Heat – responsible for temperature changes in water Energy is  ABSORBED  when temp is increasing, and  RELEASED  when  getting cooler (more solid) o Latent Heat – responsible for water changing its physical state Energy is  ABSORBED  when temp is increasing, and  RELEASED  when  getting cooler (more solid) o Relative Humidity (RH) – ratio of how close the air is to being saturated with  water vapor. Dry air = 30% RH Moist air = 70% RH Saturated air = 100% RH Sub­saturated Air ­ relative humidity is < 100% o Evaporation will be  faster than condensation Saturated Air ­ relative humidity is = 100% o Evaporation and condensation rates are Equal o We are in the state of  equilibrium. Supersaturated Air ­ relative humidity is > 100%
background image RH Values: o Mixing Ratio – pertains to  how much water vapor is present  in the atmosphere. o Saturation Mixing Ratio – corresponds to the max  amount of water vapor that can  be in the air  at a given temperature. o The warmer the air, the more water that can be evaporated (more energy).
o There is an 
inverse relationship between TEMPERATURE and RH VALUES. When temp is @ highest, RH is @ lowest 6am is typically the coldest, resulting in highest RH 4pm is typically the warmest, resulting in lowest RH o Three Rules to RH: ↓  As air becomes warmer, it can hold more water (saturation mix ratio and 
temp go hand in hand).
Inverse relationship between sat mix ratio and RH, and inverse with temp 
and RH.
Mixing ratio and RH go hand in hand. Dew Point and Relative Humidity: o Dew point ­ tells us the temperature at which the air has to cool down to in order  to saturates and tells us the  absolute amount of water vapor present  in an air  sample. The higher the dew point temp means more water vapor present. o Dew Point Depression – corresponds to weather the air is relatively dry or moist;  difference between temp and dew point on Station Model. Temp minus dew point; tells us the degrees needed to cool down (till 
saturation reaches 100%)
Largest difference in temp and dew point gives you the lowest RH. The shorter the dew point depression, the higher the RH . o Dew Point Temp – if we have a dew point of 70 vs 60, 70 had a greater amount of water vapor present and will need to cool down. Container Analogy: Warmer air can hold more moisture o Even if RH is the same in different locations, the area (container) with the warmer
temperature will have more moisture!
Temp. & Rel. Humidity = The HEAT Index A lot of water vapor present means it’s harder for it to evaporate, meaning more difficult 
to cool down.
Influences on Temperature: Latitude ­ 

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Bowling Green State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
26 Pages 43 Views 34 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Bowling Green State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Bowling Green State University
Department: Geography
Course: Weather and Climate
Professor: Marius Paulikas
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: GEOG and geography
Name: GEOG FINAL STUDY GUIDE
Description: These notes cover everything learned in class from the study guide.
Uploaded: 04/30/2018
26 Pages 43 Views 34 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to BGSU - Geog 1250 - Study Guide - Final
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to BGSU - Geog 1250 - Study Guide - Final

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here