×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to FSU - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to FSU - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

FSU / CRIMINOLOGY / CCJ 4450 / What is the definition of lambda?

What is the definition of lambda?

What is the definition of lambda?

Description

School: Florida State University
Department: CRIMINOLOGY
Course: Criminal Justice Administration
Term: Fall 2018
Tags: Criminal Justice Administration, CCJ4450, Ranson, FSU, fall 2018, Study Guide, and Exam 1
Cost: 50
Name: CCJ4450- Criminal Justice Administration- Study Guide- Exam 1- Fall 2018- Dr. Andrew Ranson
Description: This is the Study Guide for Exam 1. This study guide includes the following: Black- Powerpoint notes (he does NOT post them on Canvas) Red- Notes from the textbook (stated his exams will be 85-90% from the book) Blue- Notes from his lectures PLEASE NOTE THAT HE WILL BE FINISHING THE LECTURE THE CLASS BEFORE THE EXAM SO THIS GUIDE DOESN'T INCLUDE THAT LAST PART OF LECTURE. IT'S ONLY 1 PAGE IN
Uploaded: 09/18/2018
11 Pages 53 Views 6 Unlocks
Reviews


BOOK: CRIME CONTROL IN AMERICA: WHAT WORKS? BY JOHN L. WORRALL (4TH ED.) POWERPOINT SLIDES LECTURE NOTES TEXTBOOK NOTES


What is the definition of lambda?



EXAM 1 STUDY GUIDE 

I. Chapter 1 Vocabulary

a. Lambda PG. 7

i. The number of crimes an individual commits within a given time frame

b. Victimization paradox PG. 8

i. A high level of fear with a correspondingly low likelihood of victimization

c. Solution (crime control) PG. 12

i. The means to an end, in this case crime control

d. Outcome (crime control) PG. 12

i. That which is likely to be affected by the solution

e. Outcome evaluation PG. 13

i. A method of determining whether some form of social action is a success or a failure f. Process Evaluation Pg. 13

i. A method of determining whether a program or policy is operating as it should be g. Soft sciences PG. 14


What is the definition of the victimization paradox?



i. The social sciences primarily

ii. Fields that focus on the study of social phenomena in their natural settings

h. Hard sciences PG. 14

i. Scientific fields of study characterized by research that is usually conducted in tightly  controlled laboratory settings Don't forget about the age old question of What are the principles of a healthy diet?

i. Classical experiments PG. 14

i. The gold standard for scientific research

ii. A study that includes (1) a treatment group and a control group, (2) a pretest and posttest, and (3) a controlled intervention If you want to learn more check out What is the difference between thermal energy and temperature?

j. Qualitative research PG. 16

i. A largely exploratory method of inquiry characterized by in­depth research on a specific  location or group of subjects

k. Quantitative research PG. 16

i. A method of inquiry characterized by the analysis of numerical data designed to represent concepts of interest


What is the definition of the hard sciences?



l. Macro­level crime control PG. 16

i. Consists of approaches to the crime problem that are intended to have a dramatic and  desirable effect on crime in an entire neighborhood, city, state, or even across the nation m. Micro­level crime control PG. 16

i. Consists of approaches to the crime problem that are more isolated geographically n. Displacement PG. 17

i. The spillover or movement of crime (in the case of crime control) into a surrounding area not targeted by the intervention in question We also discuss several other topics like What is the importance of law?

o. Diffusion (crime control) PG. 17

i. A reduction in crime not only in the area targeted by an intervention but also in 

surrounding areas

ii. Also referred to as a diffusion of benefit

p. Bandwagon science PG. 21

i. Focusing research on what is trendy or popular at a given time, perhaps ignoring other  worthy problems and avenues of inquiry

BOOK: CRIME CONTROL IN AMERICA: WHAT WORKS? BY JOHN L. WORRALL (4TH ED.) POWERPOINT SLIDES LECTURE NOTES TEXTBOOK NOTES

q. Academic crusade PG. 21

i. When research loses objectivity and its used to further a political agenda, often in the face of overwhelming evidence to the contrary

r. Evidence­based justice PG. 22

i. Use of the best available scientific evidence to guide criminal justice policy and practice s. Meta­analysis PG. 22

i. A research technique that amounts to synthesizing the literature devoted to a specific  topic

II. Chapter 2 Vocabulary

a. Crime control perspective PG. 27

i. A belief that the key aim of criminal justice policy is the control of crime, perhaps at the  expense of individual liberties and due process protections Don't forget about the age old question of How to calculate elementary row operations?

b. Due process perspective PG. 27

i. A belief that the key aim of criminal justice policy is the protection of due process and  people’s rights, even if crime control suffers

c. Criminal justice wedding cake model PG. 31

i. A model of the criminal process emphasizing how cases are processed

ii. Top layer cases are the fewest in number and receive the full gamut of the criminal  process while the lowest level cases, which are the greatest in number, receive quick and  informal processing

d. Liberal perspective PG. 34

i. With respect to crime control, an emphasis on the protection of people’s rights and  liberties We also discuss several other topics like What is the major source of vitamin k for humans?

ii. Corresponds closely with a due process perspective

e. Conservative perspective PG. 34

i. With respect to crime control, an emphasis on tough punishment and crime control ii. Corresponds closely with a crime control orientation If you want to learn more check out What are the three leaf arrangement patterns?

f. Consensus perspective PG. 36

i. A set of beliefs that (1) certain norms and values are the core elements of social life, (2)  people are committed to a certain social order, (3) solidarity is evident in the interaction  between people of all groups, and (4) everyone willingly submits to a legitimate 

authority, typically the government

g. Conflict perspective PG. 37

i. A belief that self­interest, coercion, exclusion, hostility, sectional interests, political  power, contradictions, and other such factors best describe social interactions

h. Specific deterrence PG. 42

i. When a sentenced offender is discouraged from committing additional crimes due to his  or her capture/ incarceration

i. General deterrence PG. 42

i. When others besides the sentenced offender are discouraged from committing additional  crime due to sentencing/ incarceration practices

j. Absolute deterrence PG. 42

BOOK: CRIME CONTROL IN AMERICA: WHAT WORKS? BY JOHN L. WORRALL (4TH ED.) POWERPOINT SLIDES LECTURE NOTES TEXTBOOK NOTES

i. The belief that the collective actions of the criminal justice system on the whole 

discourage criminality

k. Marginal deterrence PG. 42

i. Incremental changes in the deterrability of crime due to changes in various dimensions of the criminal justice system and process

l. Retribution PG. 43

i. A goal of criminal justice concerned with punishing criminals on the basis of the severity  of their crimes

m. Just deserts PG. 43

i. The punishment an offender “deserves”

n. Incapacitation PG. 44

i. Removing criminals from society, usually through incarceration (or sometimes through  home confinement, electronic monitoring, or a similar method of restraint)

o. Rehabilitation PG. 44

i. A planned intervention intended to change behavior

III. Chapter 1 Review

a. Crime Control PG. 2

i. Two goals

1. Punish offenders

2. Reduce future offending

b. Types of crime PG. 3

i. Violent crimes

1. Forcible rape

2. Murder/ homicide

3. Assault and battery

4. Robbery

ii. Property crimes PG. 4

1. Larceny/ theft

2. Burglary

3. Motor vehicle theft

4. Arson

iii. White collar crime

1. Crimes committed by people during the course of their professional careers

iv. Public order crimes

1. Crimes that offend social order (vice crimes)

a. Prostitution

b. Gambling

c. Substance abuse

v. Why do we care?

1. Our policies and programs should be specific to certain crimes and changes in 

time

c. Why is crime control important?

i. Criminal law is always expanding

ii. The financial costs incurred PG. 7

BOOK: CRIME CONTROL IN AMERICA: WHAT WORKS? BY JOHN L. WORRALL (4TH ED.) POWERPOINT SLIDES LECTURE NOTES TEXTBOOK NOTES

iii. Harms caused to victims physically and emotionally

iv. Affects quality of life for both individuals and communities PG. 8

d. Variation in crime PG. 7

i. Geographical

1. Volume of crime differs across neighborhoods, cities, counties, etc.

2. Conditions that lead to crime differ

ii. Temporal

1. Level of crimes can change over time

2. LaFree (1998) points to a decrease in confidence in government institutions as a  reason for rising crime rates between 1960’s and the early 1990’s

e. Variation in criminal behavior

i. Amount of crime within individuals typically declines over time

1. Could be due to 

a. Risk

b. Responsibility

2. Also varies among PG. 7

a. Gender

b. Race

c. Age

d. Social status

f. Approaches to crime control PG. 9

i. Laws

1. There can be variation in the laws both across states and in how they are applied ii. Official policies

1. Those that may be enacted by criminal justice agencies

2. May be written or unwritten

iii. Unofficial policies PG. 10

1. Policies outside of public agencies

2. Informal social control: people protecting each other

g. Crime

i. Overly­ specific

1. Strategy aimed at reducing one crime of one degree PG. 11

ii. Overly­ vague

1. Strategy aimed at reducing one crime of one degree

iii. We need to define

1. The problem

2. The solution

3. The desired outcome

h. Defining the desired outcome PG. 12

i. Solution is the means to the end

ii. Outcome is the end result

1. May include

a. Crime

b. Costs

c. Citizen satisfaction

BOOK: CRIME CONTROL IN AMERICA: WHAT WORKS? BY JOHN L. WORRALL (4TH ED.) POWERPOINT SLIDES LECTURE NOTES TEXTBOOK NOTES

d. Fear

i. Evaluating crime control PG. 13

i. Outcome evaluation (impact assessment)

ii. Ideally we would want to be able to conduct an experiment where we could randomly  assign people or areas to receive a crime control policy and another area would not

iii. Classic experimental design PG. 14

1. Treatment group and control group

2. A pretest and posttest

3. A controlled intervention (policy or program)

iv. Often difficult for ethical reasons

j. Hard and soft sciences PG. 14

i. Soft sciences

1. Includes criminology, sociology, political science, economics, etc.

2. Confounded by outside influence

ii. Hard sciences

1. Includes physics, chemistry, biology, etc.

2. Laboratory setting

k. Quantitative and qualitative PG. 16

i. Quantitative data

1. More generalizable than qualitative

2. Statistics (or numerical)

ii. Qualitative data

1. Uses interviews, observation, and/or content analysis

2. Labels

l. Micro­ and macro­ level crime

i. Micro

1. Smaller units

2. Usually individuals

ii. Macro

1. Larger units

2. Cities, counties, states, etc.

iii. Ecological fallacy PG. 17

1. Using macro­level research to draw micro­level conclusions

iv. Individualistic fallacy

1. Using micro­level research to draw conclusions about macro­level units

v. Difference is important when evaluating whether or not a policy or treatment is effective m. Displacement

i. Spatial displacement: crime is pushed in to other areas

ii. Target area: area where we think our crime control method will decrease time

iii. Displacement zone: where crime may move to

iv. Temporal displacement: criminal offense occurs at a different time of the day

v. Tactical displacement: a different method is used for committing robberies in parking lots as opposed to on a street corner

vi. Displacement of crime type: individual may choose to engage in a different form of crime vii. Problem: It is difficult to measure displacement – how do we know for sure it has  occurred?

BOOK: CRIME CONTROL IN AMERICA: WHAT WORKS? BY JOHN L. WORRALL (4TH ED.) POWERPOINT SLIDES LECTURE NOTES TEXTBOOK NOTES

n. Diffusion

i. Also known as free rider effect

ii. Problem: defining geographic areas to which crime is likely to be displaced or which  diffusion of benefits may be witnessed

o. The tentative nature of scientific knowledge PG. 18

i. Generalizations

1. Same as implementing a program set for one specific area and putting it in 

another area

ii. The measure used

1. Researchers often rely on different measures of the same phenomenon

p. Research

i. Cross­sectional research PG. 20

1. Research on data that is taken at one point in time

ii. Longitudinal Research

1. Research that follows the same group of people or area over a period of time

q. Funding and political priorities

i. Hard money: the money that is given to an agency through the appropriations process ii. Soft money: sought through funding sources

iii. Bandwagon problem: researchers devote all of their energies to a specific topic and other  topics are ignored

r. Evidence and effectiveness

i. Evidence­based justice: approach calls for using the best available scientific evidence in  policy and program decisions

ii. Meta­analysis

IV. Chapter 2 Review

a. Why are Perspectives Important to Crime Control? PG. 27

i. What causes crime?

1. Environment

2. Lack of education

3. Don’t think they’ll get caught

4. Opportunity

5. Previous victimization, etc.

ii. Many policies and programs used to control crime are based on these viewpoints b. Operational Perspectives PG. 27

i. They consist of views about how the criminal justice system operates or how it should  operate

1. Crime control viewpoint

a. Follows “assembly line” metaphor

b. Purpose of criminal justice system is to control crime

c. Individuals rights = secondary concern

d. Goal is to process as many offenders as possible with little delay

i. Large emphasis on police and ability to exercise judgement

e. Conservative viewpoint

2. Due process viewpoint

a. Follows “obstacle course” metaphor

b. Most important attribute is to protect the due process and individual rights

BOOK: CRIME CONTROL IN AMERICA: WHAT WORKS? BY JOHN L. WORRALL (4TH ED.) POWERPOINT SLIDES LECTURE NOTES TEXTBOOK NOTES

c. Emphasizes legal guilt

i. Let courts decide, minimize police interference

ii. Innocent until proven guilty

d. Liberal viewpoint

e. Four different ideals

i. The criminal justice system should look like an obstacle course

ii. Quality is preferred to quantity

iii. Formality over informality

iv. Places a great deal of faith on the courts

c. System and Non­System PG. 30

i. A system is a group of interacting, interrelated or interdependent entities

1. It is harmonious and orderly

ii. People have conflicting views on whether or not the criminal justice system is a real  system

1. Many different agencies are interacting and interdependent in the criminal justice  system

d. Well­Oiled Machine PG. 30

i. This view is set in what can be called “old idealism”

1. This holds that diligent and hardworking officials enforce the law as it is written  in the statutes

2. However, not all aspects of the criminal justice system work well together

a. There can be conflicts between agencies regarding jurisdiction

b. There can be issues in communication between agencies

i. Can result in cases being rejected for prosecution

c. There can also be issues between agencies when individuals are released 

from prison

i. In many communities there are a lack of resources for individuals 

returning from prison

ii. Not enough resources for agencies to track and treat them either

3. There may not be enough resources in a certain organization for them to perform  their job

a. Ex: A parole officer may have too large of a caseload to perform their job 

effectively

ii. “Old idealism”

1. Walker – a view that the components of the justice system work well together and rigidly adhere to their organizational missions

iii. The funnel model of justice PG. 31

1. Criminal process begins with offenses known to the police, self­reported criminal  activity, and the dark figure of criminal victimization

iv. Criminal justice wedding cake model

1. Top layer cases are the fewest in number and receive the full gamut of the 

criminal process (celebrated cases) while the lowest level cases, which are the 

greatest in number, receive quick and informal processing

a. Celebrated cases PG. 33

b. Serious felonies

c. Not­so­serious felonies

BOOK: CRIME CONTROL IN AMERICA: WHAT WORKS? BY JOHN L. WORRALL (4TH ED.) POWERPOINT SLIDES LECTURE NOTES TEXTBOOK NOTES

d. Misdemeanors

e. Political Perspectives PG. 34

i. Can be used to explain opinions on

1. Causes of crime

2. Consequences of crime for society

3. What should be done about crime

ii. Liberal perspective

1. Focuses on the protection of people’s rights and liberties

2. Causes of crime

a. Crime is due to environmental factors, not individual choice

i. It is a result of a number of factors

1. Ex: peers, poor family environment, psychological issues, 

and a lack of opportunities to be successful in conventional 

life (ex: lack of education)

3. What should we do about crime?

a. Favor treatment, rehabilitation programs, job training, and other 

prevention­oriented methods of addressing crime

iii. Conservative perspective

1. Crime control is of greater importance than rights or liberties

2. Causes of crime

a. Crime is a product of individual choices and individuals are rational 

decision­makers who weigh the pros and cons of each option

i. There is a cost and benefit to every crime for people

b. People engage in crime when the benefits of committing the crime 

outweigh the costs of committing the crime

c. If this is how people think and make decisions than deterrence­related 

methods of crime control should be adopted

d. Focus on longer prison sentences and the speed of the court process needs 

to be quicker

3. What should we do about crime?

a. Tough on crime, want increased sanctions

b. Aggressive control tactics that force individuals to reflect on their actions

c. More police

d. Fewer impediments to law enforcement (trust them more)

iv. Policies themselves do not necessarily correspond to one political perspective as there  should be high levels of overlap between them

1. Usually aligns conservative and liberal perspectives on crime

2. Ex: Clinton Violent Crime Act included measures from both perspectives

3. Video: Act made issue worse

v. Crime policies can be highly politicized and neither liberals nor conservative politicians  want to appear soft on crime

1. Ex: Willie Horton TV ad for 1988 presidential campaign by Bush against 

Dukakis.

a. Dukakis vetoed a bill that would have prevented furloughs for those 

convicted of first degree murder

BOOK: CRIME CONTROL IN AMERICA: WHAT WORKS? BY JOHN L. WORRALL (4TH ED.) POWERPOINT SLIDES LECTURE NOTES TEXTBOOK NOTES

b. Video Ad: Crime Policies, Bush v. Dukakis ­ Willie Horton was convicted

of first degree murder and was allotted 10 weekends to get out of jail due 

to Dukakis veto. He escaped and kidnapped and murdered a couple after 

repeatedly raping the woman

c. Huge reason Bush won against Dukakis

d. There was an increase in crime at the time

vi. Consensus perspective PG. 36

1. Everyone in society agrees to be governed

a. Norms and values are the core elements of life

b. People are committed to a certain social order

c. Solidarity in society is evident due to interaction of people from different 

groups

d. Everyone willingly submits to a legitimate authority

e. People generally agree on issues of social welfare that are most important

2. Crime is product of poor socialization

f. Non­Political Perspectives PG. 37

i. Conflict perspective

1. Capitalism and the tension it creates between classes is what causes crime

2. Crime should be reduced by decreasing the gap between the rich and the poor

a. Everyone should have the same opportunities

3. Extreme conflict thinkers (communist and socialist) want to abandon capitalism  and equality

g. Politics and Research

i. Research often does not get implemented into policies

ii. This is due to :

1. Academics not communicating their research to politicians or starting their work  in a way that politicians understand

2. Academics focus more on root causes which can be difficult to change

3. Politicians are bound to act to the wishes of their constituents

4. Politicians also have budgetary concerns and might not have the ability to make  changes to things that are the root causes of crime

5. The research may be location­specific (not generalizable)

6. Public opinion

a. The public may favor to get tough on crime policy

7. Research tends to focus on what does not work

8. Political ideology

9. Lack of experiments in criminal justice research

10. Research evidence might not be seen as strong enough to support the policy

iii. What can help facilitate the translation of research into policy?

1. Research­ practitioner relationships

2. Research that emphasizes both public safety and cost­savings

3. Leadership by policy­ makers

a. Policy­makers who seek out research and have a desire to institute its 

findings

4. Researchers who bring public attention to others

a. Writing editorials, being quoted by media, etc.

BOOK: CRIME CONTROL IN AMERICA: WHAT WORKS? BY JOHN L. WORRALL (4TH ED.) POWERPOINT SLIDES LECTURE NOTES TEXTBOOK NOTES

5. Expert testimony

6. Use of experiments

7. Growing prison expenditures provides a need for alternatives

8. Creating easy to understand summaries of research for policy­makers

9. Making research easy to interpret

10. Education of social scientists

iv. Policy­makers focus on

1. Quick fixes

2. Costs

3. Political opposition

4. Reelection and claiming credit

h. Goals of crime control

i. Deterrence

1. All about discouraging behavior

2. Beccaria: argued that punishments should be

a. Swift

i. Punishment is quickly administered

b. Severe enough to discourage individuals engaging in the criminal act 

again

c. Certain

i. A high likelihood of being caught

ii. Note that views by offenders will partially be based upon their 

personal experiences

3. There are two main* types of deterrence and two extra

a. Specific deterrence*

i. Applies to people that have been caught!

ii. Deterrence that occurs when an individual is punished

iii. The goal is to deter the individual who is punished from further 

actions that break the law

b. General deterrence*

i. Deterrence that occurs as a result of laws and legislation

ii. The individual is deterred without receiving any form of 

punishment

iii. It is the threat of the punishment rather than the experience of 

punishment that deters people

c. Marginal deterrence

i. Focuses on the deterrability of new sanctions

ii. These new sanctions should act to decrease crime beyond the 

current levels

iii. Many of the approaches to crime discussed are thought to have 

marginal deterrence because they can be

1. Altered

2. Abandoned

3. Implemented aggressively

d. Absolute deterrence

BOOK: CRIME CONTROL IN AMERICA: WHAT WORKS? BY JOHN L. WORRALL (4TH ED.) POWERPOINT SLIDES LECTURE NOTES TEXTBOOK NOTES

i. Daniel Nagin: notation that the “collective actions of the criminal 

justice system exert a substantial deterrent effect

ii. It is the system as a whole that deters crimes

4. Weaknesses of deterrence PG. 43

a. It is difficult to measure general deterrence

b. Assumes that everyone is able to weigh costs and benefits

c. Individuals are unlikely to be aware of all the potential repercussions

d. Prior work shows that most individuals are unable to accurately predict the

likelihood of being caught, and the sentence length for offenses

e. Offenders may suffer from addiction and/or mental illness which can 

hinder their ability to rationally assess the costs and benefits

f. It is difficult to catch offenders, this weakens any deterrent effect that 

sanctions may pose

ii. Retribution

1. The punishment is focused on the severity of the crimes

a. Crime = punishment

b. Does NOT focus on any aspect changing people’s behaviors

2. The goal is to

a. Ensure that individuals are punished fairly

b. The offender gets what they “deserve”

3. Limitations of retribution

a. Punishments are often influenced by extralegal factors

i. Racial minorities are more likely to be sentenced to prison

ii. Quality of legal help is partially determined by socioeconomic 

status

1. Some people get less help due to social status

b. Focuses solely on past as opposed to future (myopic) PG. 44

c. Doesn’t really care about preventing future criminal act

iii. Incapacitation

1. Removing offenders from society so they are unable to commit crime

a. Usually through:

i. Home confinement

ii. Electronic monitoring

iii. Jail/ prison

iv. Similar method of restraint

b. The public crimes lessen

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here