×
Log in to StudySoup

Forgot password? Reset password here

UWEC - THEA 125 - Class Notes - Week 3

Created by: Hannah Notetaker Elite Notetaker

Schools > University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire > Theatre > THEA 125 > UWEC - THEA 125 - Class Notes - Week 3

UWEC - THEA 125 - Class Notes - Week 3

School: University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire
Department: Theatre
Course: Intro Theatre-History
Professor: Jennifer Chapman
Term: Fall 2018
Tags: Japanese, theater, history, Matsukaze, noh, and drama
Name: Intro to Theater History- Week 3
Description: Classical Japanese Theater, Matsukaze Quiz preparation, Lecture notes, Supplemental Readings
Uploaded: 09/26/2018
5 5 3 4 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 2 of a 5 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image   Classical Japanese Theater (09/17/2018 - 09/21/2018)   
14th century: 
​emperor secedes to a ​shogun​ (military dictator)   - ruling class: Samurai   
DEVELOPMENT- 
​elements of Greek Dithyrambic evolution   - Ashikaga family saw a religious dance performed by Zeami, son of Ka’nami  
- were so impressed by the dance, they wanted him to live in their compound and further develop this 
dance form  
more and more people began to watch as the dance form became more and more perfect    
- dance became 
theater ​when performed for an audience, ​it was no longer a ritual ​(similar to Greece)     
Japanese theater blended Aristocratic 
(privileged people) ​and popular affiliations ​(peasants)  - combined acting, singing, dancing, and spectacle   - characters and plots were already familiar   - followed  strict​ performance conventions    
Eastern Japan: 
​valued perfection ​(NO changes to repertoire)   Western Japan:  ​valued generation to generation change and evolution    
NOH- 
​influenced by Zen Buddhism   ACHIEVE 2 THINGS:   1. peace through the acceptance that desire must be abandoned and that nothing Earthly is  permanent  2. YUGEN: ​ ​moment you see a sparrow land on a blossoming cherry tree, you feel beauty in that  moment, but you know that the cherry blossom will fall,  the tree will die, the bird will die   
- most ancient form of theater in Japan 
- emerged out of a Shinto dance ritual (dance and religion, as in Ancient Greece) 
- emerged from social and religious traditions in a Feudalistic society 
- performers trained with a level of formality to follow rules and directions 
perfectly   
- images of nature 
(ZEN BUDDHISM) ​show the value of humans in nature    - old pines in Noh symbolize a sacred force, that the play is about spirits or encountering spirits    
Sarugaku-no, Dengaku-no: 
​dances to meditate on a Buddhist concept (similar to ​Dithyrambs​)   
masks block actors visibility on stage 
- actors rely on four pillars to indicate where they should stand    
art of walking (represents the energy the actor has behind their mask)  
- expression of minimalism  
- focus on actors feet moving slowly  
 
(matsukaze may have taken 15 minutes to ready, but the performance would be three hours) 
 
background image   THE STAGE- must be made EXACT, or actors will be thrown off 
- modeled after a Shinto temple, indoor version maintains the roof  
- Noh does not take place in an actual Shinto temple because it is 
NOT ​a religious dance   - has four pillars 
- no curtain to separate audience from actors  
expression of minimalism   - actors enter from a bridgeway, where they “transform into character”  
- this transformation occurs in front of the audience  
- music consists of the chorus chanting as a melodic and rhythmic accompaniment 
 
Matsukaze   ​originally written by Kan'ami, but was extensively reworked by his son, Zeami   - performed by ALL Noh companies  
 
- set in the Bay of Suma (familiar in Japanese Literature)  
- Suma is mostly associated with Ariwaka no Yukihara (818-893)  
- exiled at Suma, recounted in his poetry 
- formed basis for many stories and legends  
- inspired narrative of Genji’s exile at Sumain (Tale of Genji)  
- narrative seems to have been inspired by Kan’ami  
 
PLOT   
- two sisters, 
Matsukaze (Pining Wind) and Murasame (Passing Autumn Rain), ​were in love with the  exiled, nobleman Yukihara  
- even after their deaths, they yearn for Yukihara 
- Matsukaze in near frenzy, dances while wearing Yukihara’s 
hat and robe  - mistakes Yukihara for a pine tree  - in Noh, this depicts intense inner emotions  
mood set by moonlight and pine tree    
SETTING  
Autumn, Suma Shore at Kobe Island  
 
Waki 
​(secondary actor): traveling priest   Kyogen  ​(interlude actor): a villager   Shite  ​(main actor): Matsukaze ​pining wind  Tsure  ​(accompanying shite actor): Murasame ​passing autumn rain   
SYNOPSIS 
1. Waki entrance:  ​a priest traveling from Kyoto, sings of scenery as he passes the capital. ​first  thing he notices is a pine tree with a poem tablet attached.  ​Reaches a village by the suma  seashore.   2. Waki- Kyogen:  ​priest asks a villager about the pine tree, he is told it is a memorial for two  salt-gathering girls (Matsukaze and Murasame). the girls were lovers of the exiled nobleman 
Yukihira  
3. Shite-Tsure Entrance:  ​matsukaze and murasame appear, singing of the poor life of saltmakers.  describe the moonlit seascape, and Autumn wind as they reminisce about Yukihira. 

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire who use StudySoup to get ahead
5 Pages 182 Views 145 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire
Department: Theatre
Course: Intro Theatre-History
Professor: Jennifer Chapman
Term: Fall 2018
Tags: Japanese, theater, history, Matsukaze, noh, and drama
Name: Intro to Theater History- Week 3
Description: Classical Japanese Theater, Matsukaze Quiz preparation, Lecture notes, Supplemental Readings
Uploaded: 09/26/2018
5 Pages 182 Views 145 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UWEC - Class Notes - Week 3
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here