×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to WVU - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to WVU - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

WVU / Biochemistry / BIOC 410 / What does a lineweaver burk plot show?

What does a lineweaver burk plot show?

What does a lineweaver burk plot show?

Description

School: West Virginia University
Department: Biochemistry
Course: Introduction to Biochemistry
Professor: Kimberly barnes
Term: Fall 2018
Tags: glycolysis, glucose, Enzymes, substrates, Carbohydrates, metabolism, ATP, regulation, and gluconeogenesis
Cost: 50
Name: Exam 2 Study Guide
Description: This is a pretty detailed outline of all the material required for us to know for this exam, especially glycolysis!
Uploaded: 10/05/2018
8 Pages 130 Views 7 Unlocks
Reviews

jabrowder (Rating: )


dmc0008 (Rating: )



Biochemistry Study Guide Exam 2  Dr. Krauss


What does a lineweaver burk plot show?



Highlight = Important Principle         Highlight = Key Term

PowerPoint 6: Enzymes

Enzyme 

­ A catalytic protein used to speed up a reaction, but does not initiate it 

­ Function is to provide an environment in which a reaction can occur more rapidly ­ Does not affect the equilibrium of a reaction

­ Made of proteins; has cofactors and coenzymes

­ Cofactors: smaller than coenzyme, usually an inorganic compound (i.e. 

Mg2+) 

­ Coenzymes: larger and more complex; often a vitamin (i.e. biocytin)

­ Other Key Terms: If you want to learn more check out How does a stratovolcano form?

­ Prosthetic Group: covalently bonded non­polypeptide unit required for biological function of some proteins ­ Holoenzyme: enzyme plus cofactor and/or coenzyme


What are the types of enzyme inhibition?



­ Apoenzyme: enzyme only

­ Classification of Enzymes

­ Please see page 189, Table 6­3 of the textbook for a chart of classifications

­ Most enzymes are globular 

Catalysis

­ There are 3 types of catalysis:

­ Acid­Base Catalysis 

­ Covalent Catalysis 

­ Metal Ion Catalysis 

­ Acid­Base Catalysis

­ Reaction is catalyzed by an acid or a base

­ Uses the Bronsted­Lowry definition of acid and base in which the acid is a proton donor and the base is  the proton acceptor

­ The acid or base is used to stabilize intermediates so the reaction may proceed forward to the desired  product, rather than having it break down rapidly to form reactants 


What are the different types of enzyme regulation?



We also discuss several other topics like What is parsimony?

­ Covalent Catalysis

­ Used when a covalent bond forms between an enzyme and a substrate

­ Requires the regeneration of a free enzyme before the next reaction can occur ­ A­B  A + B

­ A­B + X:  A­X + B  A + X: + B

­ Metal Ion Catalysis

­ Ionic interactions with the enzyme stabilize the substrate

­ Ionic bond formed

­ Catalyst is always regenerated in the reaction

Enzyme Kinetics: Michaelis­Menten

­ Enzyme getting saturated with substrate (Refer to page 199, Figure 6­11: Michaelis­Menten Graph) ­ Km=1/2(VMax) We also discuss several other topics like What are the homeostasis and personality?

­ V0=(VMax*[S])/(Km+[S]) 

­ E + S  ES  E + P

­ First transition is K1, second is K2 

­ At low [S] most of enzyme is unbound

­ At high [S] most enzyme is complex: enzyme is saturated [ES]

Lineweaver­Burk

­ Equations

­ 1/V0 = Km/VMax * 1/[S] * +1/VMax 

­ Slope: Km/VMax

­ Intercept: 1/VMax 

­ Multiple Substrates and Products

­ Enzyme reaction involving a ternary complex

­ Can bind in any order, but must bind both substrates before reaching 

product

­ Enzyme reaction in which no ternary complex is formed

­ Refer to page 205, Figure 6­13)

­ Ternary product forms at cross of lines

­ No ternary product when lines are parallel We also discuss several other topics like All organizations are groups, but not all groups are what?

Enzyme Inhibition

­ Reversible 

­ Competitive

­ Uncompetitive 

­ Mixed

­ Irreversible

­ Competitive Inhibition 

­ Inhibitor binds to active site before substrate

­ “Compete” for active site

­ Change in slope of Lineweaver­Burk, but not the intercept

­ Uncompetitive Inhibition 

­ Inhibitor binds to the complex formed between an enzyme and a substrate

­ Change in intercept, but not slope

­ Mixed Inhibition 

­ Inhibitor can bind to the enzyme itself or the complex formed between the substrate and  the enzyme

­ Changes the slope and the intercept

­ Irreversible Inhibition 

­ Inactivation of an enzyme by a tightly, typically covalent, bound inhibitor 

­ Does not follow competitive or non­competitive kinetics 

Regulation of Enzymes

­ Can be positive or negative 

­ Types:

­ Allosteric

­ Covalent Modification

­ Proteolytic

­ Etc. If you want to learn more check out What is spuriousness?

­ Allosteric Regulation 

­ Modulator binds to or interacts with enzyme to increase or decrease affinity for substrate

­ Reversable

­ Covalent Modification

­ The covalent attachment of a molecule to modify the activity of an enzyme

­ Proteolytic Cleavage 

­ Cleaves peptide using peptidase to activate an alternative enzyme

­ Non­reversible since the peptide is cut into pieces

Week 6 and 7: Carbohydrates

Carbohydrates

­ Cm (H2O)n 

­ Names end in ­ose

­ Classified by size

­ Monosaccharides, Disaccharides, Trisaccharides, Oligosaccharides, and 

Polysaccharides  

­ Have one of two functional groups

­ Aldose (an aldehyde)

­ Ketose (a ketone)

­ All carbohydrates have at least one chiral carbon

­ Whether a carbohydrate is in the D or L conformation is dependent on the ­OH group  furthest from the functional group

­ D: ­OH on the right

­ L: ­OH on the left

­ Epimers 

­ Differing carbohydrates by the position of 1 ­OH (hydroxide) If you want to learn more check out What modern countries make up this country today (iraq, turkey, syria, jordan, israel, lebanon, egypt)?

­ D configuration of carbohydrates most common in nature

­ Ring Structures

­ Carbohydrates form ring structures 

­ ­OH can be above or below the ring

­ Above= alpha

­ Below= beta

­ Carbon one is anomeric because it decides the conformation

­ See page 241 for information about Reducing Sugars 

Monosaccharides

­ Approximately 7 or fewer carbons long

­ STRUCTURES TO KNOW 

­ D­Glucose

­ D­Fructose

­ D­Ribose

­ D­Mannose

­ D­Galactose

Disaccharides 

­ Disaccharide Formation 

­ Carbon 1 reacts with Carbon 4 of another monosaccharide

­ Two monosaccharide units 

­ STRUCTURES TO KNOW 

­ Maltose

­ Alpha­Glucose + Beta­Glucose

­ Lactose

­ Beta­Galactose + Beta­Glucose

­ Sucrose

­ Beta­Fructose + Alpha­Glucose

­ Is a 1­2 bond instead of a 1­4 bond 

Polysaccharides 

­ Many monosaccharide subunits 

­ Homopolysaccharide­ a polysaccharide that is made of only one type of monosaccharide ­ Heterosaccharide­ a polysaccharide made up of several types of monosaccharides ­ Typically greater than 100 subunits 

­ Can be branched or unbranched

­

Carbohydrates Continued

­ Storage Form of Carbohydrates 

­ Plants: Starch (Amylose + Amylopectin)

­ Structures on page 254 

­ Animals: Glycogen

­ Cellulose

­ Indigestible to us

­ High tensile strength

­ Chitin

­ Very strong

­ Found in the exoskeletons of some insects and crustaceans 

­ Glycoconjugates 

­ Modified carbohydrates

­ Covalently link carbs and proteins

­ Play roll in cell recognition

­ Proteoglycan Aggregates 

­ Carb tube with protein “strings” or “legs” coming off

­ Glycoproteins 

­ Can be O­linked or N­linked

­ Oxygen or Nitrogen linked respectively 

­ Glycolipids 

­ Carbs attach to lipids and proteins

See charts and diagrams on page 258­267 for representations of the carbohydrates  continues section

Week 7 Notes: Metabolism

­ Recall Laws of Thermodynamics 

­ 1st Law of Thermodynamics

­ Energy is conserved 

­ 2nd Law of Thermodynamics

­ Entropy is always increasing

­ G = H ­ TS

­ Equilibrium Constant, Keq

­ Keq=[C]C[D]D/ [B]B[A]A 

­ G’ = ­RT ln (K’eq)

­ When K’eq is… 

­ > 1.0 reaction goes forward and delta G is negative

­ = 1 reaction is at equilibrium and delta G is 0

­ < 1.0 reaction goes in reverse and delta G is positive

­ Actual Delta G

­ aA + bB  cC + dD

­ delta G = delta G’ + RT ln ([C]C[D]D/[A]A[B]B 

­ Changes as reaction proceeds

­ Can be overcome by removal of products

­ Coupling Reactions 

­ Combining two reactions to allow a reaction to occur that previously would not occur spontaneously on its  own

­ ATP Requiring Reactions

­ ATP hydrolysis typically linked to other reactions

­ Usually a two­step process

­ See Fig. 13­18 on page 512 

­ Phosphoryl Group Transfer Potential

­ Generate ATP by taking a phosphate from something and giving it to ADP

­ See Fig. 13­19 on page 512

Oxidation­Reduction Reactions

­ Not a big part of our exams

­ Involves the transfer of electrons

­ Loss of electrons = oxidations

­ Gain of electrons= reduction

­ “Reducing” the charge because electrons are negative

­ Reducing Equivalents

­ e­ = one free electron

­ H = 1 e­ + 1 H+ 

­ :H = 1 H+ + 2 e­ 

­ O2 = ultimate electron acceptor in metabolism

­ FAD/FADH2

­ 2 main transporters and acceptors of electrons

­ NAD(P)+/ NAD(P)H

­ Accepts 2 e­ and 1 H+ 

Week 8 Glycolysis and Gluconeogenesis 

Glucose

­ Stored as

­ Glycogen

­ Starch

­ Sucrose

­ Extracellular Matrix and Cell Wall Polysaccharides 

­ Glycogen used in synthesis of structural polymers for the cell wall and extracellular matrix ­ Pyruvate 

­ Made by oxidation via glycolysis

­ Ribose 5­Phosphate 

­ Made by oxidation via pentose phosphate pathway 

Glycolysis

­ 10 Enzymatic Steps that all take place in the cytosol of cell

­ Glucose + 2 NAD+ + 2 ATP + 2 Pi  2 Pyruvate + 2 NADH + 2 H+ + 2 ATP + 2 H2O ­ Steps 1­5: Preparatory Phase

­ Where ATP is used in preparation of Payoff Phase

­ Steps 6­10: Payoff Phase

­ Where ATP is received (2 used  4 gained)

­ 3 irreversible steps (Steps 1, 3, and 10) and 7 reversible steps

­ Phosphorylation 

­ When ATP is reduced to ADP

­ Traps biomolecules

­ Because plasma membrane only transports unphosphorylated sugars 

­ Activates biomolecules

­ Increase potential energy and makes a high energy phosphate 

compound

­ Contributes to binding energy

Pyruvate

­ Glycolysis yields two pyruvates

­ Uses of pyruvate

­ In hypoxic or anerobic conditions

­ 2 ethanol + CO2 

­ Fermentation to ethanol in yeast

­ Or 2 Lactate 

­ Fermentation to lactate in vigorously contracting muscle 

­ In aerobic conditions

­ 2 Acetyl­CoA

­ Then after citric acid cycle

­ 4CO2 + 4H2O

­ Animal, plant, and many microbial cells under aerobic conditions

Glycolysis Steps

1 Glucose  Glucose 6­Phosphate 

­ Enzyme: Hexokinase 

­ Phosphorylation of glucose to trap glucose into the cell 

­ Irreversible 

2 Glucose 6­Phosphate  Fructose 6­Phosphate 

­ Enzyme: Phosphohexose Isomerase 

­ Change Glucose to Fructose 

­ Reversible

3 Fructose 6­Phosphate  Fructose 1,6­Biphosphate 

­ Enzyme: Phosphofructokinase­1 (PFK­1)

­ KEY REGULATING STEP: Adds Pi to Carbon 1

­ Irreversible 

4 Fructose 1,6­Biphosphate  Dihydroxyacetone Phosphate + Glyceraldehyde 3­Phosphate ­ Enzyme: Aldolase

­ Cleave 6 Carbon compound to 2 3 carbon compounds

­ Reversible 

5 Dihydroxyacetone Phosphate  Glyceraldehyde 3­Phosphate 

­ Enzyme: Triose Phosphate Isomerase 

­ Change dihydroxyacetone Phosphate; Last step of the preparatory phase ­ Reversible 

6 Glyceraldehyde 3­Phosphate + Inorganic Phosphate  1,3­Biphosphoglycerate  ­ Enzyme: Glyceraldehyde 3­Phosphate Dehydrogenase

­ Inorganic phosphate added to Carbon 1; NAD+  NADH + H+ also occurs here ­ Reversible 

7 1,3­Biphosphoglycerate  3­Phosphoglycerate + ATP 

­ Enzyme: Phosphoglycerate Kinase 

­ Same phosphate from last step added to ADP to form ATP and 3­Phosphoglycerate  ­ Reversible 

8 3­Phosphoglycerate  2­Phosphoglycerate 

­ Enzyme: Phosphoglycerate Mutase

­ Move phosphate from Carbon 3 to Carbon 2

­ Reversible 

9 2­Phosphoglycerate  Phosphoenolpyruvate 

­ Enzyme: Enolase

­ Reaction releases an H2O to form the product

­ Reversible

10 Phosphoenolpyruvate  Pyruvate + ATP 

­ Enzyme: Pyruvate Kinase 

­ Phosphate transferred from previous molecule to ADP to form ATP and Pyruvate ­ Irreversible 

­ Pyruvate will tautomerize from enol form to keto form; write in keto form 

­ Summary of Glycolysis 

­ CHO: 1 Glucose  2 Pyruvate

­ ATP: 2 ADP  2 ATP

­ Use 2 ADP, gain 4 ATP for a net gain of 2 ATP

­ NADH: 2 NAD+  2 NADH + H+ 

­ Synthesis of Glucose 

­ Maintain blood glucose for energy to body 

­ Will pass out and inevitably die if not maintained 

­ Body uses glycogen stores in approximately 15 hours

Gluconeogenesis 

­ Series of 3 bypass reactions

­ Used to generate glucose 

­ The opposite of Glycolysis 

­ Costs 2 ATP

Bypass Reactions of Gluconeogenesis 

1 A) Bicarbonate + Pyruvate  Oxaloacetate 

­ Enzyme: Pyruvate Carboxylase 

­ Costs ATP

­ Done in Mitochondrion

B) Oxaloacetate + GTP  Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)

­ Enzyme: PEP Carboxykinase

­ Costs ATP; Also yields GDP and CO2 

­ Done in Cytosol 

­This first bypass can also be done with lactate initially 

2 Fructose 1,6­Biphosphate  Fructose 6­Phosphate 

­ Enzyme: Fructose 1,6­Biphosphotase 

­ Uses water and removes a phosphate from the reactant

3 Glucose 6­Phosphate  Glucose 

­ Enzyme: Glucose 6­Phosphotase 

­ Uses water and removes a phosphate from the reactant 

­ Notice that the three bypass reactions are the opposite of the 3 key regulating steps (the only three  reversible ones) in glycolysis: steps 1, 3, and 10. 

­ Summary of Gluconeogenesis 

­ CHO: 2 Pyruvate  1 Glucose

­ Makes sense because pyruvate is a 3­carbon molecule and glucose is a 

6­carbon molecule

­ ATP: 4 ATP + 2 GTP  4 ADP + 2 GDP + 6 Pi 

­ NADH: 2 NADH  2 NAD+ 

­ Regulation of These Pathways 

­ To maintain homeostasis 

­ Steady­state levels of substrates and products

Regulation of Enzymes

1 Hormone to substrate for transcription factor

2 Transcription 

3 Degradation 

4 Translation 

5 Sequestration

6 Substrate for use

7 Ligands for Use

­ For more detailed and in depth looks at these, see page 578 

VERY IMPORTANT:

­ See pages 592­596 to see several allosteric regulations that were highly stressed in  lecture

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here