×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Syracuse - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Syracuse - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

SYRACUSE / Astronomy / ASTR 101 / How did kepler challenge the earth­ centered model?

How did kepler challenge the earth­ centered model?

How did kepler challenge the earth­ centered model?

Description

School: Syracuse University
Department: Astronomy
Course: Our Corner of the Universe
Professor: C. armendariz-picon
Term: Fall 2018
Tags: kepler and newton
Cost: 50
Name: Exam 2 Study Guide
Description: these notes cover what's going to be on Exam #2
Uploaded: 10/12/2018
7 Pages 20 Views 6 Unlocks
Reviews

chelseaschnapp (Rating: )


lqu101 (Rating: )



AST 101: EXAM 2 STUDY GUIDE


How did kepler challenge the earth­ centered model?



THE COPERNICAN REVOLUTION: 

How did Copernicus, Tycho, and Kepler challenge the Earth­centered model? Modern science began with the Copernican revolution. 

Copernicus:  

∙ Believed that tables of planetary motion based on the Ptolemaic model were becoming 

inaccurate 

∙ He began to look for new ways to predict planetary positions 

∙ Believed in heliocentric ideas  discovered geometric relationships that strengthened this  believe, because they allowed him to calculate each planet’s orbital period and relative  

distance from the Sun 

∙ His model was complex, because it was based on the believe of perfectly circular 


What keeps the planet rotating and orbiting the sun?



heavenly motions; Copernicus kept adding more and circles 

∙ Wasn’t as accurate 

Tycho:  

∙    Observed an alignment of Jupiter and Saturn 

∙    Observed a nova (new star) and proved that it was farther away 

∙    He also saw a supernova – explosion of a distant star 

∙    Proved that comets lay in the realm of the heavens  We also discuss several other topics like What is the purpose of heuristics?

∙    Improved the Copernican system; more accurate, but didn’t come up with an explanation  for planetary motion If you want to learn more check out Why was the american revolution considered a process instead of an event?
Don't forget about the age old question of What is the inverse function of the exponential function?
We also discuss several other topics like Where were oldowan artifacts excavated?

∙    He was convinced that planets must orbit the Sun, but because he couldn’t detect stellar 


Who discovered that the basic law that describes how gravity works?



parallax, he thought that the Earth was stationary 

  ∙        His model: the Sun orbits Earth and planets orbit the Sun 

Kepler:  

∙ Worked to match circular motions to Tycho’s data; which still was off by about 8 

arcminutes, which is why he had to abandon the idea of circular orbits 

∙ Found that orbits are not circles, but are special ovals – ellipses 

∙ Each ellipse has two foci 

∙ The long axis of the ellipse is called major axis, each half of which is called semimajor 

axis 

∙ The short axis is minor axis, half of which is semiminor axis

∙ Eccentricity – describes how stretched out an ellipse is compared to a circle  ∙ A circle is an ellipse with zero eccentricity  We also discuss several other topics like The origins of rome are explained using what?

By using elliptical orbits, Kepler created a Sun­centered model that predicted  planetary positions with outstanding accuracy. We also discuss several other topics like How are reliability and validity related?

Kepler’s three laws of planetary motion: 

KEPLER’S FIRST LAW: 

The orbit of each planet about the Sun is an ellipse with the Sun at one focus.  The planet is closest to the Sun at the perihelion and farthest from the Sun at the aphelion. 

KEPLER’S SECOND LAW: 

A planet moves faster in the part of its orbit nearer the Sun and slower when farther from the  Sun, sweeping out equal areas in equal times 

KEPLER’S THIRD LAW: 

More distant planets orbit the Sun at slower average speeds, obeying the relationship p2 = a3  P is planet’s orbital period and a is its average distance from the Sun 

The fact that the more distant planets move more slowly led Kepler to suggest that the planetary  motion might be the result of a force from the Sun 

Galileo: 

∙ Demonstrated that a moving object remains in motion unless a force acts to stop it  ∙ He built a telescope and saw sunspots on the Sun and proved that the Moon has 

mountains and valleys 

∙ Observed the Milky Way and concluded that stars were far more distant  ∙ Observed four Moons orbiting Jupiter 

∙ Observed that Venus goes through phases in a way that proved that it must orbit the Sun  and not Earth 

DESCRIBING MOTION: 

An object is accelerating if either its speed or its direction is changing 

The acceleration of a falling object is called the acceleration of gravity

An object’s momentum is the product of its mass and velocity 

The only way to change the object’s momentum is to apply force to it 

The net force acting on the object represents the combined effect of all the individual forces put  together 

An object must accelerate whenever a net force is applied to it 

NEWTON’S LAWS OF MOTION: 

Newton showed that the same physical laws that operate on Earth also operate in the heavens. 

NEWTON’S FIRST LAW: 

An object moves at constant velocity if there is no net force acting upon it 

In space, there is friction of air: 

That is why a spacecraft doesn’t need fuel to keep going after its launched into space and why  astronomical objects don’t need fuel to travel through the universe 

NEWTON’S SECOND LAW: 

Force = mass x acceleration 

F = ma 

This law explains why large planets such as Jupiter have a greater effect on asteroids and comets  than smaller planets such as Earth 

Because Jupiter is much more massive than Earth, it exerts a stronger gravitational force on  passing asteroids and comets, and sends them scattering with greater acceleration 

NEWTON’S THIRD LAW: 

For any force, there is always an equal and opposite reaction force 

Conservation laws: 

What keeps the planet rotating and orbiting the Sun? 

Conservation of angular momentum: an object’s angular momentum cannot change unless it  transfers angular momentum to or from another object 

The law of conservation of energy tells us that energy cannot appear out of nowhere or  disappear into nothing 

Objects can gain or lose energy by exchanging it with other objects 

Conservation of energy: energy can be transferred from one object to another or  transformed from one type to another, but the total amount of energy is always conserved 

Types of energy: 

Kinetic energy – energy of motion 

Potential energy – stored energy 

In astronomy the most important subcategory of kinetic energy is thermal energy – the total  kinetic energy of many individual particles 

Gravitational potential energy: depends on the object’s mass and how far it can fall as a result of  gravity; it increases when it moves higher and decreases when it moves lower 

THE LAWS OF GRAVITY: 

Isaac Newton discovered that the basic law that describes how gravity works. Newton expressed  the force of gravity mathematically with his universal law of gravitation: 

∙ Every mass attracts every other mass through the force called gravity  ∙ The strength of the gravitational force attracting any two objects is directly proportional 

to the product of their masses 

∙ The strength of gravity between two objects decreases with the square of the distance  between their centers. Gravitational force follows an inverse square law 

Fg = G  M 1M 2 

(d)d

Newton’s version of Kepler’s third law allows us to calculate the masses of distant objects 

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here