×
Log in to StudySoup

Forgot password? Reset password here

UWEC - THEA 125 - Study Guide - Midterm

Created by: Hannah Notetaker Elite Notetaker

Schools > University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire > Theatre > THEA 125 > UWEC - THEA 125 - Study Guide - Midterm

UWEC - THEA 125 - Study Guide - Midterm

School: University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire
Department: Theatre
Course: Intro Theatre-History
Professor: Jennifer Chapman
Term: Fall 2018
Tags: oedipustheking, Ancient Greece, Aristotle, sophocles, Hamlet, noh, Matsukaze, japanesetheater, kanami, zeami, middle, AGED, Renaissance, Elizabethan, Shakespeare, hamletmodernism, Realism, naturalism, CherryOrchard, dollshouse, ibsen, chekhov, americanmusical, and Midterm Study Guide
Name: Intro to Theater History Midterm Study Guide/ Review
Description: ancient greece, oedipus the king, aristotle's rules ancient japanese theater, noh, matsukaze the middle ages, the renaissance, elizabethan period, hamlet modernism and realism, the cherry orchard, a doll's house american music theater study guide materials as posted on d2l with in depth explanations from lecture, supplemental readings, and class notes
Uploaded: 10/16/2018
0 5 3 23 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 7 of a 46 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image   INTRO TO THEATER HISTORY MIDTERM STUDY GUIDE  ANCIENT GREECE ​​: marked beginning of​ dramatic literature   - greeks were responsible for the invention of drama    
drama: 
​​written plays (dramatic literature)   theater:  ​​performance practices    
- earliest known greek dramatist was thespis 
- thespis won the first theatrical contest held at athens in 6th century   - aeschylus usually considered the first great greek playwright, introduced dialogue and interacting 
characters into playwriting  
- sophocles developed irony as a literary technique 
 
after 3rd century bce greek literature declined  
 
- Greek tragedy came from Athens 
- Greek theater was written and performed solely by MEN  
men played female roles and choruses   ​​playwrights composed music, choreographed dancers, and “directed” actors   - dramas typically involved a  chorus​​ that represented a group (such as the polis)  - chorus interacted with a single actor who  wore a mask​​ and recited a narrative in verse   - chorus recited exposition, and expanded on poetic ideas    
aeschylus introduced the idea of two masked actors and the chorus playing different parts  
- this created staged drama as we know it today   - oldest surviving play by aeschylus (oresteia)  
 
sophocles introduced three or more actors, which allowed more complexity/complicated 
character dynamic  
 
performances were not naturalistic  
- stylized   - actors wore masks, performed song and dance  - plays were not divided into distinguishable acts or scenes   - violent actions took place off stage  (GREEKS DID NOT LIKE VIOLENCE)​​ and were later  described on stage 
 
tragedies had a consistent structure  - episodes (scenes with dialogue) were followed by choral songs   - chorus may be divided into  strophe and antistrophe ​​(call and response)   - we believe the chorus was choreographed based on the following words  
 
parados: entrance   strophe: turn  exodos: exit   antistrophe: anti-turn    - most plays opened with monologue (prologue, introduction)  
background image   - chorus entered after introduction, sang  parados   - final scene with chorus:  exodos   
origins of tragedy are debated  
 
THEORY 1: thespis (thespian) and improvisation by dithyrambs led to the creation of drama 
- the greeks adopted religion from Mesopotamia and worshipped gods with dance 
- dionysus was the god of wine, fertility, partying, and drinking  
- the greeks honor dionysus by drinking, partying, and having sex (greek version of girls gone wild LOL) 
 
- men performed dithyramb choral odes that honored Dionysus 
CHORAL ODES​​: call and response, gestures, and repetition (like a Catholic Church setting)   
- 50 men (elders) gathered at a hillside in a circle with an alter in the middle (probably wearing goat skins) 
- sang tragoidia (goat songs)  
- why we believe they wore goat skins, and sacrificed a goat  - worship was important because honoring Gods determined survival for the year  
 
- thespis stepped out of the circle and improved a dithyramb solo part, created 
DIALOGUE   
​​this leads to plays    
- people watched dithyramb performances from the hillside 
- those who missed the ritual would request to see it again 
 
IS THEATER AN ENACTMENT? 
- the relationship between actors and the audience is what we use to define whether or not something is  
   theater (was the dithyramb for god or for the people?)  
 
THEORY 2: Drama evolved from rites performed on the tombs of heroes 
- when a greek warrior died, community members gather at their gravesite 
- this led to dramatic literature (especially mythical stories of battle)  
 
THEORY 3: Drama was sudden and deliberate with Aeschylus  
- aeschylus was the first known playwright  
 
NEW HISTORICISM
​​: searches for bias (blind spots in History)                        historians assume a lot            creative genius    
- Basically says that old historians assume that Aeschylus wasn’t smart enough to invent drama on his   
  own 
 
POLITICS 
​​women were not considered citizens because they were thought to be irrational since they were  emotional   - were thought of as in charge of emotions 
- to be full of feeling is irrational  
background image   - could not participate in theater because participating in theater= citizenship  
 
theater is thought to have emerged out of the city of dionysia    
city of dionysia: 
​​religious festival where ancient greece turned into a giant party to honor dionysus   - eat, throw up, eat more; drinking; orgies   
- 550 bc pisistratus governed others in greece  
​​heard popular dithyrambs, poets at the time were constructing drama, using dialogue, and  experimenting with performances   - pisistratus wanted to make athens the “cultural center of the world”   suggested holding tragedy contests, whoever won would have their play performed   - submit a trilogy (three plays)/ three plays with a satyr (comedy) play to follow    
people sit in the theater the whole time, for all plays 
 
rules for play competition: TRAGEDIES CAN ONLY HAVE 2 ACTORS 
- sophocles introduced a 3RD ACTOR AND INCREASED THE CHORUS FROM 12 TO 15   
AGON (DEBATE): 
​​debate is an important practice of citizenship and the heart of democracy  debate then is not what we think of when we think of debate today   - person poses a question, another challenges the questions and gets a response  - new knowledge is learned TOGETHER (not like debates we see on TV)   - no one “wins”    
protagonist: 
​​hero, main character (ONLY MALES)   - central character  - always flawed in some way   antagonist:  ​​works against the protagonist achieving their goals  - obstacle    
THE THEATER 
greeks want to see extraordinary people facing extraordinary things 
 
original conditions: 
​​outdoors (​environment is important to the audiences experience)   - structures were originally impermanent, eventually became permanent   1. dithyramb hillside  
2. carved seats in hill 
3. add a tent for 
skene building​​ (more on this later)  4. carved seats in the hillside/ permanent architecture    
half circle: 
​​stage space   orchestra: ( ​​where performances took place) dancing place, alter may have been in the middle or against         the skene to honor dionysus   skene:  ​​small building, actors used it for changing, storing painting and machinery   chorus:  ​​choral portions are organized into words that have enter and exit (parados and exodos), not on    stage the entire play   
background image   - audience members sat in wedges according to their tribe  - important men or men with wives sat in the front  
- only MEN perform  
- audience was probably mostly men  
- attending plays is 
an important part of citizenship    
gives greeks a sense of community and identity 
 
most of what we know about ancient greek theater comes from vase paintings  
 
vase paintings: 
​​uncertain about if artists envisioned or actually saw the plays   - depict plays  
 
pronomos vase:  ​​shows actors masked, chorus unmasked, depict satyr  - rehearsal of satyr plays   - contemporary audience relies on facial movement/response (couldn’t have seen actor’s face 
through mask)  
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
background image   Oedipus the King (431 BCE)   WHAT MAKES A GOOD KING?  emotions.   men were thought of as rational because they did not show emotion, women thought to be irrational 
because of emotions (making decisions based on emotion)  
sophocles shows to be rational, we must purge ourselves of emotions  
emotions play an important role in leadership  
​​regarded as perfect tragedy by ARISTOTLE    
oedipus is very emotional, says he will save his people, and he DOES, even if it means sacrificing 
himself. 
 
PLAYWRIGHT: 
​​Sophocles (296- 406 BCE, Classical Athens)   - ancient greek tragedian   - oedipus the king was the second of Sophocles’ three Theban plays to be produced  - height of Sophocles’ achievements, one of three ancient greek tragedians whose plays have 
survived  
- shows that we should purge ourselves of emotion or we end up like Creon.    
SETTING 
- city of thebes  - citizens are dying of plague caused by a curse on the city   - oracle is located in DELPHI, this is not the setting of the play (quiz 1)    
CHARACTERS 
Oedipus: protagonist 
- emotion is the most important trait to being king. 
- king of thebes  
- renowned for ability to solve riddles/intelligence  
- saved city of thebes by solving the sphinx’s riddle (sphinx is being who held city captive) 
- oedipus’ name means “swollen foot” 
clue to his identity   - given up by Laius and Jocasta and left in the mountains with his feet bound and pierced 
- on the way to thebes, he kills Laius (his father) because he did not know this was his father* 
- marries his biological mother Jocasta* 
*a part of the prophecy that made Laius and Jocasta get rid of Oedipus as a baby 
 
Creon: antagonist 
​​brother of Jocasta, Oedipus’ brother in law   - rationality is the most important trait to being king.  
- claims to not want to be king  
- never shows emotion as oedipus does  
- authoritative 
 
Jocasta: 
​​wife and mother of Oedipus, sister to Creon   - does not want oedipus to banish creon  
- urges oedipus to reject tiresias’s prophecies  
- knows that oedipus is her son before oedipus does, wants to protect him from finding out (this  
shows her love for him) 
-portrayed as irrational because she is a woman 
background image    
Tiresias: 
​​blind prophet (ironic)   - tells oedipus that he is the murderer of the king (oedipus in disbelief)  
- metaphorical blindness of oedipus to who he really is  
 
Chorus: 
​​reacts to onstage events  - reactions show how the audience should or should not interpret events 
- may indicate how the polis feels about certain issues/ things happening in the play   
  
PLOT 
- curse on thebes, causing citizens to die of plague 
 
my city, i will save you. your suffering is mine. 
 
- oedipus sends creon to apollo to ask how the curse could be lifted 
- creon explains curse will be lifted when the person who murdered laius (former king) is prosecuted  
- laius was murdered at a crossroads   
- oedipus promises to discover the murderer, questions citizens 
- tiresias, blind prophet, tells oedipus that he is the murderer 
- jocasta tells oedipus the prophet is wrong 
- she tells oedipus about how she and laius had a son whose fate was to kill laius and sleep with her 
- she and laius had the child killed by binding his ankles, gave oedipus to a shepherd who was to tie him 
to a tree and leave him to be eaten by wolves 
- shepherd actually ended up giving oedipus to another family (oedipus= swollen foot)  
 
- oedipus skeptical, worried 
- oedipus was told he was adopted, that he would kill his biological father, and sleep with his biological 
mother, and he killed a man at a crossroads (how laius died) 
- jocasta tells oedipus not to think about the past 
- oedipus questions a shepherd and messenger, who tell him how he was adopted by a new family 
 
- jocasta realizes that she is oedipus’s biological mother and laius was his father  
- she kills herself out of pure terror at what has happened by hanging herself in her room  
- oedipus realizes the prophet was right and that he murdered laius. he also slept with and had children 
with his mother  
- gouges his eyes out with jocasta’s brooches 
- exiled and wanders the desert until he dies (punishment to himself for what he has done) 
 
- curse from thebes is lifted 
 
oedipus saves his city, just as he said he would.  
 
ANALYSIS (LECTURE/ SUPPLEMENTAL READING) 
WHAT MAKES A GOOD KING? 
​​emotions.   - men were thought of as rational because they did not show emotion, women thought to be irrational 
because of emotions (making decisions based on emotion)  
- sophocles shows to be rational, we must purge ourselves of emotions  
background image   - emotions play an important role in leadership  
- regarded as perfect tragedy by ARISTOTLE  
 
- prologue and five episodes 
- episodes introduced by a choral ode  
- cause and effect chain (investigation of the past) 
we do not yet have the invention of exposition  - fate in the play is caused by all things that have already occured,  fate is unalterable    
main themes: - 
​​fate and free will  - individual conflict  - painful truth (jocasta and oedipus, especially)   - being blind and sight (ironic that teiresias can see better than oedipus, who is blind to the truth 
about his past and crimes)  
 
dramatic irony: 
​​oedipus curses the murderer of laius, so he is actually cursing himself, insults tiresias’  blindness, though he will eventually be blind (gouges out his eyes), rejoices when king corinth dies, when 
this actually brings the prophecy to light  
 
DOES SOPHOCLES FOLLOW ARISTOTLE’S RULES? 
1. IS THE PLAY ABOUT ONE THING?  about oedipus saving the city, what makes a good king  
 
2. ARE THE CHARACTERS RATIONAL?   yes, oedipus says he will save the city, takes steps necessary to save the city  
 
3. DO THEY THINK WITH REASON/ MATHEMATICALLY?   oedipus says he will save the city, takes steps necessary to save the city  
 
4. IS THE VERBAL EXPRESSION BEAUTIFUL?   yes, play and chorus is poetry 
greeks expected to hear and be elevated by beauty  
 
5. DOES THE CHARACTER SPEAK TRUTHFULLY TO WHO THEY ARE?   yes, oedipus is a great king, takes steps necessary to save his people, even when it means sacrificing 
himself  
 
CATHARSIS: 
​​catharsis at the end of the play, oedipus purges himself of emotion by wandering the desert  until he dies, curse is lifted off of the city  
 
VISUAL ADORNMENT: ekkyklema (
​​low platform on wheels, rolls out from the skene building​)   machina:  ​​crane, flies over skene building, can be used to fly in an actor playing a God   periaktoi:  ​​indicated a scene or change of scene    
 
 
 
 
 

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire who use StudySoup to get ahead
46 Pages 620 Views 496 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire
Department: Theatre
Course: Intro Theatre-History
Professor: Jennifer Chapman
Term: Fall 2018
Tags: oedipustheking, Ancient Greece, Aristotle, sophocles, Hamlet, noh, Matsukaze, japanesetheater, kanami, zeami, middle, AGED, Renaissance, Elizabethan, Shakespeare, hamletmodernism, Realism, naturalism, CherryOrchard, dollshouse, ibsen, chekhov, americanmusical, and Midterm Study Guide
Name: Intro to Theater History Midterm Study Guide/ Review
Description: ancient greece, oedipus the king, aristotle's rules ancient japanese theater, noh, matsukaze the middle ages, the renaissance, elizabethan period, hamlet modernism and realism, the cherry orchard, a doll's house american music theater study guide materials as posted on d2l with in depth explanations from lecture, supplemental readings, and class notes
Uploaded: 10/16/2018
46 Pages 620 Views 496 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UWEC - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here