Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

UWEC - THEA 125 - Class Notes - Week 7

Created by: Hannah Notetaker Elite Notetaker

> > > > UWEC - THEA 125 - Class Notes - Week 7

UWEC - THEA 125 - Class Notes - Week 7

School: University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire
Department: Theatre
Course: Intro Theatre-History
Professor: Jennifer Chapman
Term: Fall 2018
Tags: musical, theater, modernism, Realism, chekhov, ibsen, and aristotle'srules
Name: Intro to Theater History: Week 7
Description: Lecture of Modernism and Realism, Early American Musical Theater readings
Uploaded: 10/22/2018
0 5 3 52 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 3 of a 7 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Modernism and Realism (10/15/2018 and 10/17/2018)  chekhov:  ​​may construct scenes with big events that take place off stage  - Most important things may not happen at the big event, but happen around the big event instead   - plays are based around concepts in society, interpersonal connections    
ibsen: father of modern realism 
- form is based on Aristotle’s rules (Greek tragedy)   - Realism is NOT  fully naturalistic   - not kings or gods, but ordinary people faced with extraordinary circumstances   - Play has a central question about ONE thing, that the playwright answers   - catharsis    
bedrock of tragedy is action 
In realism, action= objective 
In tragedy, action= central action around central question  
 
CROSSOVER: DOES THE PLAYWRIGHT FOLLOW ARISTOTLE’S RULES? 
1. Is the plot about ONE thing? 
2. Are the characters RATIONAL? 
3. Do characters think with REASON and MATHEMATICALLY?  
4. Is the verbal expression BEAUTIFUL? (
​​problematic because plays are no longer prose/ poetry)  5. Does the character speak truthfully to who they are?     - song composition  ​​is no longer about chorus, but about the rhythm of SILENCE and TALKING  - visual adornment ​​must support the text, and go together ​not a metaphor    
1950: 
​​rise of united states, fall of soviets, revolution in russia, and china  - political change from invention & innovation  - telephone, tv, radio, cars, airplanes, mass production, etc.  - acceleration of technical change altered daily life, new forms of living/measuring lives  - political and social changes rivaled by intellectual/cultural revolutions extends to modern theater   - encouraged internationalism across european arts    - gave rise to a series of fragmented avant-garde movements  - postmodernism: changes to modernism, distinction between high art and mass culture art   
naturalism claims a scientific attitude towards social problems, role that the social environment 
plays in character actions 
 
naturalism (duplicates material reality): 
​​provides thematic inspiration and dramatic technique   
realism (distorts truth to show psychological reality):
​​ develops a wider range of style and problematic  sense of a character and their environment 
 
subtext: may contain unspoken motives 
 
realism emphasizes the ensemble (every character important) 
background image -uses fourth wall 
-dominant performance type, may raise scandalous topics 
-flourished during independent theater movement 
 
little theater movement:
​​ establish small, modern repertoire   
forms of modern drama are fragmented in modern society 
- diverse, confusing, artistic elements  - naturalism and realism first to not express dominant political and ideological order   
realistic plays criticize modern order 
 
realistic sees world as an all-embracing environment 
inadequate to critique modern life  
- themes don’t lead to a call for social change  - liberation is essentially imagined  - accepts world as unchanging, unchangeable environment where character live out 
their lives 
 
expressionist theater (dreamlike set):
  
- departure from realism (characters unnamed)  - show mind and heart of a character visually  - challenges realistic theater, dramatic action in realism 
 
symbolist theater (drawn from mythology, imagination):   - extended expressionist theater views  - written in prose/poetry  - densely  figurative language   
epic theater (social reality, marxist ideas):
​​ perspective of world is natural  constructivist theater: ​​ stages means of production kept in view   
alienation effect (brecht, showed character as a finished product):  
- problem w/ realism\  - alert audience to stage events  - alerts audience to critical view of theater  - enhance visual clarity of realistic stage  - modern plays blend representational techniques- plays are experiments   
acting and performance is a line of business 
- each company has leading actors and others who play specific parts   
realism: 
​​character individuality - new set for each production  - actors work against their roles (psychological subtext)  - subtext of realism may contain unspoken motives     3 MAIN QUESTIONS IN REALISM 
background image OBJECTIVE:  ​​what does the character want?  - NORA WANTS POWER. SHE IS IN A POSITION WHERE SHE DOES NOT GET THAT 
POWER.  
- IBSEN IS QUESTIONING THE INSTITUTION OF MARRIAGE, AND ROLE OF WOMEN IN 
SOCIETY.  
- WHAT POWER DO WOMEN HAVE IN SOCIETY TODAY? none    
 
TACTICS: 
​​how do they get what they want?  - FLIRTING   - LYING  - HIDING HER FACE  - AVOIDS EYE CONTACT   - MANIPULATES   - GOES ALONG WITH WHAT IS BEING SAID    
(
​​VIDEO IS 0:32-6:35 IN D2L)    
OBSTACLES: 
​​what is in the way of the character getting what they want?  - TORVALD   - HER STATUS AS A WOMAN   - KROGSTAD    
DOES IBSEN FOLLOW ARISTOTLE’S RULES?  
this play is NOT realism, because the audience gets what they want. in real life, we do NOT get 
what we want. our problems are not solved and we do NOT act on our own behalf.  
 
1. IS THE PLAY ABOUT ONE THING?  yes, MONEY  2. ARE THE CHARACTERS RATIONAL?   yes, nora knows what she wants and how to get it  
other characters have had to deal with the real world  
could argue krogstad is a it irrational because of his questionable ethics 
 
3. DO THEY THINK WITH REASON/ MATHEMATICALLY?   for the most part. what nora did was illegal, but she did it because she saw it as the only way of saving 
her husband.  
 
4. IS THE VERBAL EXPRESSION BEAUTIFUL?   no, but audiences at this time do not expect the expression to be beautiful  
audiences want to see ordinary people facing extraordinary circumstances  
 
5. DOES THE CHARACTER SPEAK TRUTHFULLY TO WHO THEY ARE?  yes, nora wants money and power and she does what she has to to get it  
 
CATHARSIS: 
​​we have catharsis because nora is free of her debts and is able to assert power over  torvald at the end  
 

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire who use StudySoup to get ahead
7 Pages 115 Views 92 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire
Department: Theatre
Course: Intro Theatre-History
Professor: Jennifer Chapman
Term: Fall 2018
Tags: musical, theater, modernism, Realism, chekhov, ibsen, and aristotle'srules
Name: Intro to Theater History: Week 7
Description: Lecture of Modernism and Realism, Early American Musical Theater readings
Uploaded: 10/22/2018
7 Pages 115 Views 92 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UWEC - Class Notes - Week 7
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UWEC - Class Notes - Week 7

Forgot password? Reset password here

Forgot password? Reset your password here

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here