×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UCR - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UCR - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UCR / Psychology / PSYC 163 / How do receptors send information to the brain?

How do receptors send information to the brain?

How do receptors send information to the brain?

Description

School: University of California Riverside
Department: Psychology
Course: Cognitive Psychology
Professor: Mary gauvain
Term: Fall 2018
Tags: Cognitive Psychology, Audition, and perception
Cost: 50
Name: Exam 2 study guide
Description: This study guide contains material on perception and audition. Of course it is incomplete because there is still more to go over in lecture before the exam on Wednesday.
Uploaded: 10/27/2018
4 Pages 27 Views 5 Unlocks
Reviews

haguisanbuc (Rating: )



Infants


How do receptors send information to the brain?



* Sensation is the process of information from the world through sense receptors and brain. + these are the 5 senses ­ vision, hearing, touch, smell, taste 

+ all of these allow incoming information to reach the brain. 

* Perception is the organization and interpretation of sensations

+ Ex from class: when we touch something like a table, we first sense that we have  touched something, then sense that the surface is smooth, perception allows us to  know that it is a table

* cognition is what we do with and organize our perception  


What is an example of sensation and perception?



* What can infants do when they're very young? 

+ sensory abilities

­ Vision 

> at birth human ­ able to track a moving stimulus 

> by one month ­ able to focus properly on a stimulus

> by two months ­ pay more attention to complex stimuli  

­ Hearing  

> at birth they ­ amniotic fluid in ears ~ evidence of hearing late in the 

gestation period

> at two days old ­ able to detect the location of a sound 


What is cognition and its role in learning?



Don't forget about the age old question of Where in the thymus do t cells mature?

~ Ex from class: clap and the baby will turn its head toward sound

­ Taste 

> at one day old ­ preference for sweet taste

> at four days old ­ show preference/ recognition for taste of some foods  mother ate during pregnancy 

> at one week old ­ able to differentiate between sweet and bitterness ­ Smell  

> at two days old ­ distinguish odors  

> at six days old ­ can distinguish the smell of their mother's milk from  another nursing mother's  Don't forget about the age old question of What is the greatest crime against humanity?

­ Touch  

> at three days old ­ show sensitivity to pain 

~ contrary to an old popular belief 

~ why? Pain receptors are acute 

> mouth ­ most sensitive area 

~ why they put everything in their

* Perception 

+ develops early and fast  

­ perception includes attention, identifying, and locating  

+ struggles of studying infants

­ have not yet developed speech so they cannot tell us what they're thinking or  what they are feeling 

+ how do we study infants?

­ track eye movements = preferential looking = time spent looking at one thing  versus another

­ discrimination of changes 

*Habituation/ dishabituation

+ powerful when used with infants

+ "bored"

* Conditioning/ reinforcement 

+ can they recognize mother's voice?

* Questions/ problems with the methods We also discuss several other topics like What was the main cause of the nativist movement?

+ inference

­ we guess what the baby's actions mean; we can never truly know  + absence of response 

­ can only make inferences from what they do 

+ what's in their head?

­ can never be sure of what they are thinking about  We also discuss several other topics like How is fabric made by weaving?

* Development trends 

+ attention getting

­ shape, edges, contours, very loud sound, and bright light ­ all things we pay  attention to throughout life

+ attention holding

­ what holds our attention changes with development  

> we have to learn to regulate our attention

* Stimulus complexity  If you want to learn more check out What are the rights that everyone deserves?
Don't forget about the age old question of What point is preferred along an indifference curve?

+ under aroused = you go to sleep; over aroused = you can't learn 

+ infants = prefer moderately stimulating information

* Audition

+ fastest developing sense 

+ develops before vision 

+ prefer high pitched sounds (why we change our voice when talking to babies) &  melodies 

* Important changes in infancy 

+ three­day old babies prefer their mother's voice (DeCasper & Fifer, 1980) + during 4­6 months there is a shift in boundaries for sound (VVV) * Auditory localization is being able to locate where a sound is coming from + we see the rare u­shaped curve  

­ 1 month ­ good hearing

­ 2/3 months ­ bad hearing

­ 4 months ­ good again 

+ what causes the u­shaped curve?

­  shift from subcortical to cortical control (Bronson) [a reorganization]

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here