Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

UD - HDFS 270 - HDFS 270 Exam 2 Study Guide - Study Guide

Created by: Elizabeth deBruin Elite Notetaker

> > > > UD - HDFS 270 - HDFS 270 Exam 2 Study Guide - Study Guide

UD - HDFS 270 - HDFS 270 Exam 2 Study Guide - Study Guide

School: University of Delaware
Department: Human Development
Course: Families and Developmental Disabilities
Professor: Neda Moinolmolki
Term: Fall 2018
Tags: The Family and Disabilities
Name: HDFS 270 Exam 2 Study Guide
Description: These notes covered topics from the book by Andrew Solomon, 'Far From The Tree'
Uploaded: 11/06/2018
This preview shows pages 1 - 4 of a 16 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Vertical and Horizontal Identities   - Vertical Identities ​ (connecting vertically/similarly to parents)  - Def: trait/identities that are transmitted from one generation to the next   - Can be through genes (DNA)  - Can be through “shared cultural norms”  - Examples:   - Skin color, language, religion   - More likely to be accepted and reinforced  - Similar to parents   - Respected and celebrated  - Horizontal Identities   - Def: inherent or acquired identities/traits that are foreign to one’s parents   - Acquired from peers, society and large, media, etc  - Examples:   - Physical disabilities (sometimes)   - Genius   - Psychopath  - Sexual Orientation   - Different from parents   - More likely to be opposed and diminished/hidden   - Viewed as flaws    
Review: Vertical or Horizontal 
1) Accident, etc. → Horizontal  
2) Race → Vertical  
3) Sexual orientation → Horizontal  
4) Deaf → Horizontal, sometimes Vertical  
5) Religion → Vertical, can be horizontal  
6) Depression → Vertical, sometimes horizontal  
7) Blue eyes → Vertical 
 
Chapter 1: Son 
- Thoughts?  - His mom didn’t want him to be judged so she was protecting him  - New ideas/ways of thinking?  - Uncomfortable?  - How parents deal with their child being different  - Man who grew up to be gay and some disability and how he grew up and how his parents dealt 
with it and how parents are 
- Harsh realities how some parents are accepting and some arent    
 
“For some parents of children with
… page 47” 
background image Emerging themes  - “We often use illness to disparage a way of being, and identity to validate that some way of being. 
This is false dichotomy.” (Soloman, p5) 
- Accept & Value vs. Fix or Change? How is a parent to know?  - Impact of social, technological and medical advancements   Disability Definition   - A disability is any condition of the body or mind (impairment) that makes it more difficult for the 
person with the condition to do certain activities (activity limitation) and interact with the world 
around them (participation restrictions) 
 
Disability has 3 Dimensions  
- Impairment  ​​in a person’s body structure or function, or mental functioning   - Examples of impairments include loss of a limb, loss of vision, or memory loss   - Activity limitation, ​​ such has difficulty seeing, hearing, walking, or problem solving  - Participation restrictions ​​ in daily activities, such as working, engaging in social and recreational  activities, and obtaining health care and preventive services   
Disabilities may affect a person’s
…  - Visiton - Movement   - Thought - Memory   - Learning - Communication   - Hearing  - Mental Health   - Social Relationships    
Developmental Disability Definition  
- Developmental disabilities are a group of  ​severe, chronic conditions​​ attributable to a mental  and/or physical impairment. These conditions:   - Begin during the developmental period  ​(before age 22)  - May  ​impact day-to-day functioning​​ (self-care, receptive and expressive language,  learning, mobility, self-directions, capacity for independent living, and economic 
self-sufficiency) 
- Usually last throughout a person’s  ​lifetime    Why language matters  - Girl vs. woman  - What does language communicate   - Effect of language on the speaker   - Effect of language on the recipient   - Effect on others/society    
Person or identity first language 
- Person first → putting person first “person with autism”  - Identify first → putting disability first “autistic person” 
background image The three main aspects of the definition of a developmental disability are:   - Begin before age 22, impacts day to day functioning, lifelong  Person or Identify First Language   - Why do some people prefer “identity-first”   
Beyond person- and identity-first language  
- Victim/Suffering   - Handicapped  - Defects  - Special Needs  - Consumers  - Others   
Characteristics of Institutions - peak in 1970s 
- Include only PWD (people with disabilities)  - Little or no privacy   - Highly structured  - Restricted/limited choices or access  - In the past understaffed/underfunded; documented abuses    
Trends in Supporting Individuals with Disabilities  
- Normalization (1970s)  - Community systems envisioned for PWD’s rather than institutions  - Inclusion (1980s)  - Move away from separate/segregated programs towards integration   - Self- Determination (1990s)  - PWD be able to live chosen lives   - Supports (2000s)  - Understand and find ways to support PWD’s chosen paths   
Question:
​​   What can help a 5th grade student with hearing loss be successful at school?  - Individual   - Family or social supports  - School or other local groups  - Larger community or state level supports   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
background image  
Theoretical Foundations 
   
 
Social-Ecological Model  
- Social Policy  - Laws and Regulations   - Community   - Neighborhood   - State Characteristics   - Institutional   - Schools   - Workplaces   - Interpersonal   - Family Characteristics   - Social Support   - Individual   - Personality   - Genetics    
Social-Ecological Model: Definition 
- Institute of Medicine  - “A model of health that emphasizes the linkages and relationships among multiple 
factors (or determinants) affecting health”  
- Further applications beyond health   - Education   - Employment   - Happiness + well-being (broad definition of health)   Social-Ecological Model: Very brief history   - Origin: Psych and human development  - Theorists: Bronfenbrenner, Lewin & Barker  - Today: Cornerstone of US public health  What is Stigma? 

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Delaware who use StudySoup to get ahead
16 Pages 137 Views 109 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Delaware who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: University of Delaware
Department: Human Development
Course: Families and Developmental Disabilities
Professor: Neda Moinolmolki
Term: Fall 2018
Tags: The Family and Disabilities
Name: HDFS 270 Exam 2 Study Guide
Description: These notes covered topics from the book by Andrew Solomon, 'Far From The Tree'
Uploaded: 11/06/2018
16 Pages 137 Views 109 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UD - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UD - Study Guide - Midterm

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here