Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

USC - JOUR 201 - Exam 3 Study Guide - Study Guide

Created by: Sydney Notetaker Elite Notetaker

> > > > USC - JOUR 201 - Exam 3 Study Guide - Study Guide

USC - JOUR 201 - Exam 3 Study Guide - Study Guide

School: University of South Carolina
Department: Journalism Core
Course: Principles of Public Relations
Professor: Thomas Klipstine
Term: Fall 2018
Tags: Jour, 201, and Pr
Name: Exam 3 Study Guide
Description: Week 10 - 12 Notes
Uploaded: 11/11/2018
5 5 3 46 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 4 of a 19 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Exam 3 Study Guide – JOUR 201 Week 10 – 12 Notes The Publics: Media Relations • Video news releases, electronic press kits, satellite media tours - all things you might send to media or ways you might interact  with them in trying to communicate about your client or 
organization
• Newsworthy Criteria - it’s important to know what makes a story interesting to media if  you’re going to try to pitch stories to them • Agenda Setting and Framing - PR practitioners can influence the public agenda by influencing  the media agenda, and we can also help frame issues by the 
language that we use if or when that language is picked up by 
the media
Pitch like a Pro: Top 10 Tips 1. Plan your pitch (do your homework) a. suggesting a story to the media b. could be done through writing a press release, but it usually  also means calling a reporter and/or sending them emails, 
and ideally, you should develop relationships with reporters 
over time
c. you need to do your homework – on your client or your  organization and the product or event or whatever it is 
you’re pitching
d. you need to read and follow lots of media and pay attention  to what different reporters are writing about and what they 
like. When you do that, you’ll know who to pitch and how to 
pitch your story to various reporters
2. Think and write like a reported (5 W’s and H) a. think and write like a reporter. That means you need to tell  reporters the who, what, when, where, why, and how – and 
background image all of this information should be up front – in the inverted 
pyramid style of writing that we mentioned earlier
3. Find a story angle – or two or three a. Not every story you pitch is going to be totally exciting to a  reporter, but if you can find something about it – some little 
hook that will entice the reporter to read or listen to more – 
that will help in getting your client in the news
4. Pitch a specific section and/or person a. pitch specific stories to specific media or specific sections of newspapers, websites or segments of TV news programs in 
order to target the right people with the right pitches
5. Have a Plan B or “bag of tricks” a. have more ideas in case your idea gets shot down mid- pitch. If you have other ideas in mind, you’ll be able to 
suggest another one quickly. 
6. speak in bullet points of “sound bites” a. sound bites - that clip of news that you see over and over –  sometimes it’s a little clip from a speech or a phrase that 
really stuck out
i. think of these sound bites ahead of time and pitch to  reporters that way so they can envision what the story
might look like when they cover it
b. Speaking in bullet points also helps you get your point  across quickly, which helps when working with busy 
reporters
7. give a clear call to action a. want to just tell them what you’re hoping for… You might  say something like, “I’m hoping I can help arrange an 
interview between you and our CEO to discuss our new 
location that’s opening next month” – or something similar, 
depending on what you’re pitching
8. it’s never a good time (know/respect deadlines) a. Media are very busy people, just like everyone else, so try  to know and respect deadlines. The end of the day is usually
not a good time, and certain days of the week are worse 
than others depending on the media. Mondays are generally
not good days to call, either, as it’s the beginning of the 
week and everyone is busy planning and catching up from 
the weekend
background image 9. they won’t “buy” if you don’t believe a. not only do you need to know your client or organization,  but you need to have some enthusiasm. If you’re not 
excited about it, how can you expect anyone else to get 
interested in it?
10. become a valued resource (cultivate contacts) a. be honest, open, timely, doing your homework, and if you  do all of these things, media will know they can count on 
you and they will come to you when they need a story or 
when they’re looking for a source to quote on a topic. This 
will help you cultivate contacts and establish relationships 
with media over time. 
How can PR practitioners help media? - By providing experts, facts, details, quotes, photos - These “information subsides” save media time and money
- 40-70% of total news coverage comes from PR
Media Catching - sort of the opposite of media pitching, and you can think of the  baseball analogy of pitching a story versus catching one - PR people can follow reporters on Twitter or other social media  and see when they are looking for a story or source, and then 
catch that story by offering up their client or organization to the 
media. 
- Twitter account called @helpareporter that serves the same  purpose and there’s a service called ProfNet, which is from a 
company called PR Newswire. 
- journalists can sign up to find experts and PR practitioners can  sign up to look for journalists who might be looking for help Newspapers - don’t underestimate the power of local, weekly, independent  and/or free papers o stories from newspapers also appear online and on Twitter  and other social media
background image o can be great outlets for publicizing local events, news  restaurants, festivals, sports and entertainment news, and 
so on
Newswires - associated press, PR newswire and others provide info to  newspapers and TV stations o they are services that provide news to newspapers, TV  stations and other media o Associated Press – that’s one of the larger news wires
o PR Newswire – PR people can use to send news to media
Magazines - editorial calendars are key; Trade magazines may be important to a business/client o editorial calendars - These are plans magazines make in  advance to outline what they’re going to cover when For example, a magazine probably has an editorial 
calendar for the year and they know that certain 
things, such as holiday news or gift-giving guides will 
be included in the issues that will be out around the 
holidays. If you work for a company that sells items – 
toys or clothing, maybe – that might be popular for 
gift-giving, you would want to be sure to pitch your 
company or product to be included in that issue
o magazines have a much longer lead time than other media you might need to pitch a story to a magazine six 
months or so before the issues might actually appear 
in order to get your client or company in that issue
o trade magazines – may be important to your client For instance, for restaurants there is a trade magazine
called Nation’s Restaurant News that features all the 
important news about the restaurant industry. If you 
were opening a new restaurant, of course you would 
want the public to know about it, but you might also 
want other restaurants or other people in the 
restaurant industry to know about it – this is where 
trade magazines become important

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of South Carolina who use StudySoup to get ahead
19 Pages 211 Views 168 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of South Carolina who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: University of South Carolina
Department: Journalism Core
Course: Principles of Public Relations
Professor: Thomas Klipstine
Term: Fall 2018
Tags: Jour, 201, and Pr
Name: Exam 3 Study Guide
Description: Week 10 - 12 Notes
Uploaded: 11/11/2018
19 Pages 211 Views 168 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to USC - Study Guide - Final
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to USC - Study Guide - Final

Forgot password? Reset password here

Forgot password? Reset your password here

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here