Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

UB - NTR - Nutrition 108 FINAL REVIEW - Study Guide

Created by: Tenzin Sonam Elite Notetaker

> > > > UB - NTR - Nutrition 108 FINAL REVIEW - Study Guide

UB - NTR - Nutrition 108 FINAL REVIEW - Study Guide

School: University at Buffalo
Department: Nutrition and Food Sciences
Course: Human Nutrition
Term: Fall 2018
Tags: nutrition, nutrition108, nutrition science, and intro to nutrition
Name: Nutrition 108 FINAL REVIEW
Description: These notes will cover what will be on the next exam.
Uploaded: 12/02/2018
5 5 3 18 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 6 of a 35 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Module  X­ Nutrients Involved in the hematopoietic System  Topics
­Functions of blood
­Iron
­Zinc
­Copper
­Folate
­Vitamin B12
­Vitamin K
A. Introduction 1) Hematopoietic system  a. Blood (two major fractions) 1) Blood cells (in plasma) a. Red blood cells (iron, folate, vitamin b12 play a role in rbc  development)­ they originate in bone marrow, large and  immature so  they need nutrients to help form normal sized rbc b. Immune cells (lymphocytes, etc.) skip.
c. Platelets (for blood clotting) 
2) Plasma (top part) a. Albumin  b. Lipoproteins
c. Hormones
d. Nutrients  ­Glucose ­Amino acids  e. Waste products  ­Ammonia 
­Urea 
b. Bone marrow  1) Origin of blood cells 2) Function  a. Carry waste­ CO2, Urea b. Carry nutrients 1) O2 2) Glucose 
3) Amino acids
4) Lipoproteins B. Nutrients involved 1) Iron (leading nutrient deficiency­ by losing blood cells, poor intake, periods of growth) a. Trace mineral
b. Cation­ two different charges (2+ and 3+)
background image 2) Function (know 1&2) a. Component of hemoglobin (rbc) b. Component of myoglobin (in muscle)
c. Cofactor for energy metabolism 
3) Metabolism a. Very tightly controlled metabolic pathways b. Active absorption by small intestine 1) 2 to 35% of eaten 2) If the body has enough then stored in small intestine and lost in feces
3) Stored in 
a. Liver
b. Bone marrow
c. Special proteins 1) Ferritin­ way we store some iron in small intestinal cells  2) Transferrin­ protein that stores some iron in blood  system  4) Deficiency signs/symptoms a. Two levels of deficiency 1) Iron Deficiency  a) Low iron stores b) Low cognitive function
c) Low energy level
d) Pica­ craving for/eating non­food item; dangerous b/c some  foods not  meant to be digested 2) Anemia (Microcytic) a) Small red blood cells  b) Fatigue
c) Low work capacity 
d) Poor immune function b. Assessment of iron status 1) Measurement of stores  a. Blood transport proteins  1) Amount
2) Iron content
2) Blood cell measurements  a. Hematocrit (# of rbc)­> more common  b. Hemoglobin 5) Groups at risk :blood loss, poor intake of iron, high needs for iron* a. People in developing countries
b. Women (menstruating)
1) 30% iron deficient 
2) 8% anemic 
c. Growing individuals* 1) Pregnant women
background image 2) Infants 
3) Children
d. Athletes 1) May not be real, appears to be b/c of increase in blood volume (dilutes  out  some of the rbc)
2) Damage to rbcs
3) Sweat loss
4) Too much blood loss (intestinal)
e. People with excessive blood loss* 1) Ulcers 2) Wounds
3) Surgery
f. Vegetarians with poor nutritional education or habits* 6) Dietary sources a. Heme iron­ type of iron that absorbs easily 1) Good  a. Meat
b. Fish
c. Poultry 2) Bad a. Milk
b. Milk products
b. Nonheme iron 1) Fair a. Tofu (beans)
b. Whole grains
c. Dried fruits (dried on iron)
d. Leafy green vegetables (Spinach, parsley)
2) Poor a. Iron cookware b. Depends on food acidity; more acid the better
c. Depends on length of cooking; longer the better
d. Enriched flour (important because so much is eaten) 7) Special notes a. Factors that affect absorption (2 to 35%, huge range) 1) Increase a. Need absorption goes up when body stores are low
b. Heme iron is better absorbed than nonheme*
c. Meat factor protein (MFP) 1) Meat, fish and poultry 2) Helps nonheme iron absorption d. Vitamin C*­>enhances iron absorption 1) Changes charge of iron
2) Makes iron more water soluble
background image e. Stomach acid  2) Decrease a. Lack of physiological need 1) Absorption down when body stores are high  b. Excess dietary calcium
c. Dietary fiber (phytates)*
d. Tannins  1) Tea 2) Coffee
3) Red wine
b. Iron toxicity (sometimes looks like deficiency) 1) Acute (large dose at one time) a. Intestinal damage 
b. Liver failure
c. Shock 2) Chronic a. Mainly with males
b. Liver damage
c. Associated with 1) Cardiovascular disease­ may act as pro­oxidant, causing  LDL  damage)
2) Cancer­ may act as pro­oxidant, DNA damage
3) Hemochromatosis­ hereditary defect where people over  absorb  iron 2. Zinc a. Trace mineral
b. Function/metabolism
1) Cofactor a. Immune system b. Energy system
c. Component of antioxidant enzyme
c. Deficiency sign/symptoms 1) Loss of taste 2) Failure to grow
3) Impaired vision
4) Impaired immune function d. Groups at risk 1) People taking excess of  a. Iron b. This points the problem of taking single mineral supplements 
c. Copper*
d. Dietary fiber 2) Poor
background image 3) Elderly 
4) Pregnant women
5) Children e. Dietary sources 1) Found in foods high in protein f. Special notes 2) Excess will decrease copper absorption 3. Copper a. Trace mineral b. Function/metabolism 1) Cofactor of  a. Iron metabolism
b. Energy metabolism 
c. Antioxidant c. Deficiency sign/symptoms 1) Anemia (microcytic, like iron deficiency) d. Groups at risk­ Too much zinc e. Dietary sources 1) Beans 2) Seeds
3) Nuts
4) Organ meats
5) Water (if from copper pipes)
f. Special notes 1) Excess copper decreases zinc absorption* 4. Folate  a. Water soluble vitamin b. Functions  1)  Coenzyme for amino acid metabolism and DNA synthesis (new cell  production) 2) Red blood cell synthesis (rbc requires nutrients like folate b/c they are  constantly developing...when rbc originates from bone marrow, it’s large and 
immature; folate helps split it into two normal sized rbc) 
c. Deficiency signs/Symptoms  1) Macrocytic Anemia (very large and immature rbc; they don’t move oxygen  well to tissues)
2) Neural tube defects (neural tube­ consist of brain and spinal cord, a hole or gap 
develops early during pregnancy) a. Malformation of the Central Nervous System  b. Formed by the 4 th  week of pregnancy 
background image c. Spina Bifida­ type of neural tube defect that affects the spinal column; 
part of spinal cord is pushed outside of the body­>paralysis, inability to 
control bowel, bladder.  d. Groups at risk  1) Consumers of large amounts of alcohol   2) Pregnant women  3) Some types of chemotherapy can block folate  e. Dietary sources  1) Enriched products 
2) Good sources 
a. Green leafy vegetables 
b. Fruit
c. Beans
d. Breakfast cereals 
e. Liver  f. Special notes 1) Very important in preventing neural tube defects in fetus­ prenatal supplements
can be a source of folate
2) Easily destroyed by heat and air (fresh is best) 5. Vitamin B12 a. Water soluble vitamin, and largest vitamin b. Functions 1) Formation of rbc 2) Folate metabolism
3) Helps maintain myelin sheath of nerves
c. Deficiency sign/symptoms 1) Macrocytic anemia­ same as folate, different than iron 2) Fatigue
3) Staggering (neural problem, irreversible)
d. Special notes 1) Absorption  a. Requires many factors (key is intrinsic factor (substance produced by 
stomach that hooks up B12 and helps with absorption) produced in 
stomach) 
b. Active in ileum (last part of the small intestine)
c. Small amount of passive absorption in large intestine (important for 
those with pernicious anemia) 
2) Deficiency  a. Individuals who lack intrinsic factor (monthly B12 injections) b. Dietary folate can hide deficiency until irreversible neurological 
problems develop 
e. Groups at risk  1) People with stomach dysfunction 

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University at Buffalo who use StudySoup to get ahead
35 Pages 339 Views 271 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University at Buffalo who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: University at Buffalo
Department: Nutrition and Food Sciences
Course: Human Nutrition
Term: Fall 2018
Tags: nutrition, nutrition108, nutrition science, and intro to nutrition
Name: Nutrition 108 FINAL REVIEW
Description: These notes will cover what will be on the next exam.
Uploaded: 12/02/2018
35 Pages 339 Views 271 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UB - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UB - Study Guide - Midterm

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here