Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

UCONN - PNB 2264 - Study Guide - Final

Created by: emj16104 Elite Notetaker

> > > > UCONN - PNB 2264 - Study Guide - Final

UCONN - PNB 2264 - Study Guide - Final

School: University of Connecticut
Department: Physiology
Course: Human Physiology and Anatomy
Professor: Kristen Kimball
Term: Fall 2018
Tags:
Name: PNB 2264 final
Description: These notes cover all that will be on the final including in class diagrams and all power-point information.
Uploaded: 12/02/2018
This preview shows pages 1 - 4 of a 14 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image PNB 2264 PNB final  Speech/Language, Stroke and Split Brain Research  I. Introduction A.  Localization of brain functions 1. Correlation of lobes with function 2. Motor/sensory control of the body is such that one hemisphere  (e.g., left) controls contralateral side of the body (e.g., right). B. The two cerebral hemispheres are not mirrors of each other. 1. Examples of lateralized functions 2. Cerebral dominance and “handedness” For most people, the left hemisphere is dominant, the person is 
right-handed, and speech is contained in the left hemisphere.
Some left handed people (who as a whole make up about 10% of
the population) are truly right-cerebral dominant.  Most, 
however, still contain speech functions in the left hemisphere. II. Neurobiology of speech and language. A. “History” 1.  First noted in 1800s that the ability to produce/understand speech  resided in the left hemisphere. Broca: discovered that an area in the left posterior frontal lobe 
controls the ability to produce speech, and that lesions to this area 
result in expressive aphasia - the 
inability to express  thoughts in  either written or spoken language.  Also noted: in most people, this  function is in the left hemisphere.    Wernicke:  discovered the area in the temporal lobe that controls 
comprehension of speech; lesions here produce receptive aphasia - 
the 
inability to understand  the spoken (or written) word. This  function is usually lateralized to the left hemisphere also.  III. Some lateralized functions in the brain. A. Left hemisphere 1. Ability to understand and produce speech, reading, and writing. 2. “Logical, analytical, rational”.  Can “analyze” a face, e.g., by  determining whether or not it has particular features:  glasses, small/large  nose, etc. 3. Verbal memories. 4. “Western” thought - “lawyers”. 5. With damage, there is receptive and/or expressive aphasia.   B. Right hemisphere
background image PNB 2264 PNB final  1. Creative, “gestalt”(sum is . parts), intuitive, non-verbal.  “Eastern”  thought; “artists”. 2. Visuo-spatial; 2D and 3D form matching.  Both #1 and #2  contribute to the right hemisphere’s ability to “recognize” a face  immediately. 3. Music:  people who have severe speech disturbances due to left  hemisphere injury often can sing. 4. Role in speech/language: “Affective” or emotional speech; the  ability to interpret body  language, facial expression, gestures, etc. ex.  sarcasm  5. With damage:  agnosia (disturbance in recognition/perception of  familiar information), neglect of affected side, aprosodia (loss of “tone” -  expressive quality of voice), deficit in non-syntactical processing of  language (ex. sarcasm).  IV. Cerebrovascular Accident (CVA or “Stroke”) A. Cerebrovascular Accident (CVA) 1. The classic CVA site is the middle cerebral artery (slides 6-8), which  branches off the internal carotid artery, runs in the lateral fissure, and  serves the lateral temporal and parietal lobes. A thrombosis (clot) or bleed  in this region will affect the internal capsule, which is a major location for  projection fibers running to and from the cerebral cortex.  The result:  a  classic left or right hemiplegia (“half-paralysis”), on the contralateral  (opposite) side of the brain lesion. 2.  Typically, a right CVA produces left hemiplegia.  The patient retains speech and language functions  may display aprosodia o  loss of expressive quality of the voice “neglect” of the affected side  o right side is damaged so left visual world didn’t exists.  Left hemiplegics (right CVA) may show pathological lack of concern 
for their disability.
3. A left CVA will produce right hemiplegia,  Results in aphasia o Broca and/or Wernicke   such patients may retain a high degree of ability to interpret speech 
based upon “non-verbal” cues: 
o those conveyed by body language, tone, timing of words, etc.  Right hemiplegics (left CVA) typically are exceptionally upset about 
symptoms.
background image PNB 2264 PNB final  Case 1: Hemi­inattention (Right CVA/ Left Hemiplegia)
Mrs. C recently had a stroke which affected the left side of her body; she can no longer use her 
left arm, but because the right side of her brain is involved, her speech is intact. Language, of  course, is largely represented in the left side of the brain, which controls the right side of the  body. She knows she has had what her doctor euphemistically calls a cerebro­vascular accident,  but is surprisingly unconcerned by it. Indeed she is quite anosognosic, which blandly, and  roughly, translates as ignorant of any disability. This too, is not uncommon after right­brain  injury. Though well past middle­age she has always used make­up liberally, and continues to do  so, but the result is little short of horrific. She puts eyeshadow under her right eye, and lipstick  only on the right half of her mouth. Her left cheek is devoid of the rouge and powder which she  liberally applies to the right. Always fond of her food, she finishes every morsel on the right side  of her plate, leaving untouched her favourite delectables on the left, and asks for more. Her care­ givers quickly learned to rotate her plate 180­degrees, to everyone’s satisfaction. Autonomic vs somatic nervous system Somatic Voluntary Exception involuntary reflexes  o Controlling Skeletal muscle – deals with general senses touch, pain,  temp.  o Afferent sensory info, efferent motor info
o Exception involuntary reflexes 
o Synapse between neuron and skeletal muscle
alpha neuron originates in nervous system then goes to target 
skeletal muscle 
Acetylcholine neurotransmitter and receptor Any neuron that releases acetylcholine is a cholinergic 
neuron 
No inhibitory only excite or not  Single long axon  Autonomic - “visceral nervous system” o Controls processes inside body 
Involuntary
o Afferent- sense stretch of muscle on walls of organ 
o Efferent – contract cardiac or smooth muscle
o Still originates in central nervous system
Motor/efferent still comes out of ventral horn  o Difference lies in target tissue Anything other than skeletal muscle  Cardiac muscle o Heart rate
background image PNB 2264 PNB final  Smooth muscle  o Blood vessels- Blood pressure  Adipocytes o Changes energy balance  Glands  o Secretion  Saliva, acid production  Two axons instead of one  One neuron from central nervous system which form synapse 
with another neuron that connects to target tissue 
Synapse between two neurons outside central nervous 
system is called a Ganglion 
Preganglionic and postganglionic fibers  Allows more control but also more complicated  Different signaling possibilities: excite or inhibit  o Divisions of ANS Sympathetic division “fight or flight” Organized for vast discharge  Preganglionic (cholinergic o Originates in CNS (T1- L2)- most of spine(thoracic  through lumbar) Postganglionic (adrenergic neurons o Where does ganglion form  1) Sympathetic chain  Most common  Ganglion directly adjacent to spinal 
cord on both sides – two chains 
2) Collateral Ganglia  Ganglia found in abdominal cavity and
reproductive tract, close to target 
organs 
on ventral surface 3)Adrenal gland Preganglionic neuron stimulates inside
of adrenal gland – adrenal medulla 
Instead of a post ganglionic neuron 
there is an epithelial/secretory cell

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Connecticut who use StudySoup to get ahead
14 Pages 181 Views 144 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Connecticut who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: University of Connecticut
Department: Physiology
Course: Human Physiology and Anatomy
Professor: Kristen Kimball
Term: Fall 2018
Tags:
Name: PNB 2264 final
Description: These notes cover all that will be on the final including in class diagrams and all power-point information.
Uploaded: 12/02/2018
14 Pages 181 Views 144 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UCONN - Study Guide - Final
Join with Facebook

or

Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UCONN - Study Guide - Final

Forgot password? Reset password here

Forgot password? Reset your password here

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here