×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to FAU - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to FAU - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

FAU / Chemistry / CHM 2045 / What is the study of matter?

What is the study of matter?

What is the study of matter?

Description

Chemistry Exam 1 Study guide


What is the study of matter?



∙ The first 30 elements***

∙ Chemistry is the study of matter.

∙ Matter = anything hat occupies space and has mass.

∙ Mass = measure of the quantity of matter that an object has. 

∙ Matter can be classified according to physical state (solid, liquid, or gas) or composition.  ∙ Pure substances can be elements or compounds.

∙ Elements: consist of only 1 type of atom and cannot be further simplified. (ex; sodium,  helium).

∙ Compounds: combination of 2 or more elements, can be further reduced. (ex: pure water). ∙ There are 118 recorded elements on the periodic table. 

∙ Elements have a symbol, name, atomic number, and atomic weight.  ∙ Mixtures: a combination of 2 or more pure substances. 


What is a group of atoms tend to stay together­ an ion contains atoms covalently bound?



­ Homogenous mixture: uniform composition throughout.

­ Heterogenous mixture: non­ uniform composition. (can be separated by filtration). ­ When separated the components of both mixtures yields pure substances.  ∙ Mixtures can be separated based on physical properties. Such as; density, boiling point,  state of matter, vapor pressure, magnetism, solubility, etc. 

∙ Chemical compounds are composed of two or more elements 

∙ All compounds are made of molecules or ions. 

­ Ionic compounds: composed of ions. 

­ Chemical compounds: compounds have different properties than elements.  ­ Fixed composition ratio: definite % composition by mass.  Don't forget about the age old question of Define operant conditioning.

­ Example: Iron pyrite FeS2 46.55% iron and 53.45% sulfur. 


What if the numbers are not whole numbers?



∙ Physical properties: characteristics that can be evaluated without changing the  composition: color, odor, density, volume, hardness, melting point, etc.  ∙ Extensive properties: mass; depend upon the amount of the substance.  ∙ Intensive properties: density; independent of the sample size. 

∙ Density: ratio of ass to volume.

∙ D=m/V

­ Example) The density of liquid mercury at 20 degrees Celsius is 13.570 g/ml. What is the mass of 107.3 mL of mercury? 

­ 13.570g / mL X 107.3mL = 1456.06 mL = 1.456 X 10^3 g. 

­ Example) The density of acetic acid at 20 degrees Celsius is 1.05 g/mL. What volume is needed to have 275 g of acetic acid? 

­ 275g/ml (ml/ 1.05g) = 261.90 = 262 mL

∙ Physical change: a change that does not entail any change in the chemical composition.  ∙ Chemical change: one or more substances are transformed into one or more NEW  substances.  Don't forget about the age old question of What are the different types of earth crust?

­ Involves change in chemical composition. 

­ Results in a change in composition or structure. 

­ Chemical reaction: reactants  products. 

­ The reactants and products are VERY different. 

­ Example) iron metal reacts with oxygen to form rust (iron oxide).  ∙ Tools of quantitative chemistry: 

­ Measurements of length, mass, volume, time, speed, temperature, etc.  ­ Each measurement has (1) a number, (2) a label/unit, (3) a name.  ∙ Qualitative observations:  Don't forget about the age old question of Where is the funerary mask from mycenae located?

­ no numbers involved, only physical appearance. 

­ Example: color, large/ small, hot/cold, smell, etc. 

∙ Units of measurement: Systeme International d’ Unites (SI­ modified metric system).  ­ Mass; unit = kilogram (kg)

­ Length; unit = meter (m)

­ Time; unit= second (s)

­ Temperature; unit = Kelvin (K)

­ Amount of substance; unit= mole (mol)

­ ** VOLUME IS NOT A BASE UNIT ***

∙ Length: (m)

­ 1000m= 10^3 m = 1 kilometer (km)

­ 10 ^­2 m = 1 cm

­ 10 ^­3 = 1 mm

­ 10m= decameter

­ 100m= hectameter

­ 0.10 m= decimeter

­ 0.01m= centimeter

­ 100 cm = 1 m 

­ 1000mm= 1m 

∙ Size of molecules are in the nanometer range (nm) 

­ 10^­9 m= nanometer

∙ Prefixes: 

­Giga­ (G); 10^9 billion.

­ Mega­ (M); 10^6 million

­ Kilo­ (k); 10^3 thousand

­  Deci­ (d); 10 ^­1 tenth

­ Centi­(c); 10^­2 one hundredth

­ Milli­ (m); 10^­3 one thousandth

­ Micro­ (/u * fancy u); 10^­6 one millionth

­ Nano­ (n); 10^­9 one billionth Don't forget about the age old question of Who brought christian faith to the new world?

­ Pico­ (p); 10^­12

­ Femto­ (f); 10^­15

∙ Volume: NOT a base unit. 

­ Cubic meter is a volume unit­ m^3.

­ M = length 

­ M^3 = Volume

­ Common units: L, mL, cc.

­ 1 cm^3= 1 mL

∙ Mass: base unit = kg.

­ 1kg=1000 g

­ Milligrams (mg)

­ 250 mL of water= 250 g of water= 1 cup.

­ 250kg = 250 L = 1 tub.

∙ Time: base unit= second. 

­ For smaller time frames: milliseconds (ms), microseconds (*fancy u s), nanoseconds  (ns), etc. 

­ For more than a second: minutes, hours, days, weeks, etc. 

∙ Temperature: kelvin or Celsius. 

­ Conversion:  If you want to learn more check out Hyper polarization is caused by what?

­ Kelvin= Celsius + 273.15 

­ Example: The thermostat is set to 78 degrees F, which converts to about 26 degrees  C. What is the temperature in Kelvin? 26+273.15= 299.15 K.

∙ Dimensional analysis: 

­ Example) 325 mg aspirin pill. Transform to grams. 

­ 325 mg (1g / 1000mg) = 0.325 g of aspirin. 

­ Example) How many inches in ¼ mile? 

­ ¼ mile = 0.250 mile

­ 1 mile = 5280 ft.

­ 12 in = 1 ft. 

­ 0.250 (5280 ft/ 1 mile) (12 in / 1 ft) = 15,840 inches. 

­ Example) If the speed of a molecule of oxygen as 25 degrees Celsius is 490 m/s and 1 mile is 1.609km, what is the speed of oxygen in mph. 

­ 490m/s (1km/ 1000m) (1 mile/ 1.609km) (60 s / 1 min) (60 min/ 1 hr) = 1100 mph  ∙ Atomic composition: 

­ Atoms are mostly empty space.

­ At the center are protons, neutrons, and electrons. 

­ Protons = positive charge

­ Neutrons = no charge

­ Electrons = negative charge

­ The number of protons is always an integer.  If you want to learn more check out What refers to the expected earning stream of a firm's customers over a period of time?

∙ Atomic number: (Z) = number of protons. 

­ ** in neutral atoms the number of electrons = the number of protons.  ­ All atoms of the same element have the same number of protons. 

­ (Z) defines the element.

­ Example) H=1, Cr= 24, F= 9, Cu= 29

∙ Mass number: (A) = protons + neutrons

­ Can determine number of neutrons from mass number. 

∙ Neutrons = (Z) – (A)

∙ Isotopes: 

­ Existence of isotopes means all atoms of an element are NOT exactly the same.  ­ All atoms of the same element have the same number of protons. 

­ Atoms of the same element can have different numbers of neutrons in the nucleus. ­ Same protons, different neutrons, different mass number. 

­ Example) C­12 = 6 Protons, 6 neutrons, (A)= 12. 

­ C­13 = 6 protons, 7 neutrons, (A) = 13.

­ Example) Hydrogen isotopes: Protium: 1 proton, 0 neutron.

­ Deuterium: 1 proton, 1 neutron.

­ Tritium: 1 proton, 2 neutrons.

­ Cobalt­60 used in medical imaging, stable isotope, (Z) 27 protons, 33 neutrons.  ­ Iodine isotope: iodine­131, (Z)53, 78 neutrons.

­ Technecium­99, medical imaging, (Z) 93, (A)99, 56 neutrons.

­ Magnesium has 3 stable isotopes: Mg 24, Mg 25, Mg26. All have 12 protons.  ∙ Atomic weight: = average of a sample of an element. 

­ Average because most elements are mixtures of isotopes. 

­ The standard is based upon carbon – 12 isotope.

∙ Mass spectrometry: the masses of isotopes and their abundances are determined  experimentally by mass spectrometry. 

­ Each isotope is represented by a relative abundance. 

∙ Isotope Abundance: 

­ Percent abundance= number of atoms of an isotope/ number of atoms of ALL  isotopes X 100 

∙ Atomic weight (mass): 

­ Atomic weight = % abundance isotope 1/ 100 (mass of isotope 1) + % abundance  isotope 2/ 100 (mass of isotope 2)

∙ Periodic table: Dmitri Mendeleev (1834­1907) developed the table, arranged the elements according to increasing atomic mass. 

­ Used columns b/c properties are periodic; physical properties, chemical formulas,  rxns.

­ Families /groups are vertical.

­ Rows are horizontal.

­ Most elements are metals, then there are nonmetals, metalloids, alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, halogens, noble gases, lanthanide & actinide series.

∙ Compounds: combinations of 2 or more elements in definite ratios by mass.  ­ The character of each element is lost when forming a compound. 

­ 2 types of compounds: 

­ Molecular compounds: smallest unit of a compound that retains the characteristics of  the compound. Non­metal with metal. 

­ Ionic compound: composed of ions; atoms or groups of atoms with a positive or  negative electric charge. Held together by (+) (­) attraction (ionic bond). ­ Have high melting points. 

­ Most dissolve in water. 

­ Removing electrons from an atom produces a cation with a positive charge.  ­ Adding electrons to an atom produces an anion with a negative charge.  ­ Metals tend to lose electrons  cations. 

­ Non­metals gain electrons  anions. 

­ Monatomic anions are a single element and end in suffix ­ide. 

­ Group 1A= +1 charge. 

­ Group 2A excluding Be = +2 charge. 

­ Group 3A (only Al) = +3 charge. 

­ Group 5A (N &P ) = ­3 charge.

­ Group 6A= ­2 charge.

­ Group 7A = ­1 charge. 

­ Transition metals vary in charge.

­ Boron and Beryllium do NOT form ionic compounds. 

∙ Types of formulas to represent compounds: 

­ Molecular formula: describe the composition, #’s and types of each atom. Ex)  C2H6O­ Ethanol. 

­ Condensed formula: indicate how certain atoms are grouped. Ex) CH3CH2OH­  Ethanol.

­ Structural formula: shows the connections and bonds. The lines between atoms  represent the chemical bonds that hold atoms together in the molecule. ­ Molecular model: a 3­D model.

∙ Polyatomic Ions: 

­ A group of atoms tend to stay together­ an ion contains atoms covalently bound. ­ Polyatomic anions are groups of atoms with a net charge. 

∙ Naming the formula for polyatomic ions: 

cation comes first, subscripts must produce neutral unit, subscripts must be the smallest  set of whole numbers.

­ Example) Na  Na+ = sodium ion.

­ Example) Ba  Ba 2+ = barium ion.

­ Example) Al  Al 3+ = aluminum ion.

­ Transition elements vary in charge to identity use roman numerals.  ­ Example) Cu  Cu + = copper (I) ion.

­ Example) Cu  Cu +2 = copper (II) ion.

­ Example) Fe +2 = iron (II) ion.

­ Example) Fe+3 = iron (III) ion. 

­ Naming monatomic anions: add suffix ­ide. 

­ Example) Fl­  Fluoride.

­ Example) O ­2 = oxide.

­ Example) N­ 3 = nitride. 

∙ The mole: 

­ The unit used to count things. 

­ It is a really big number used to count really small things such as atoms, molecules,  etc. 

­ 1 mole is the amount of substance that contains as many particles as there are in 12.0  g of 12C.

­ 1 mol = 6.02 X 10 ^23 things.

­ Mole; 6.02 X 10^23 

∙ Avogadro's Number: 

­ 602,000 x Million x Million x Million

­ 6.0221415 x 10^23

∙ Molecular weight vs Molar mass: 

­ Molecular weight: aka molecular/ atomic mass; mass of 1 molecule in amu (1 atom). ­ Molar mass: mass of 1 mole in grams – element or compound

∙ Mass – mole conversion: 

­ 1 mol = formula weight (aka molecular/ atomic weight) in grams. ­ Atoms = atomic weight or mass

­ Molecules= molecular weight or mass

­ Ions = formula weight. 

­ Moles to mass conversion: 

­ Moles X grams/ 1 mol = grams 

­ Mass to moles conversion: 

­ Grams X 1 mol/ grams = moles

∙ Percentage composition: calculate the mass percent of each element in a compound.  ­ (atoms of an element) (atomic weight) / (formula weight of compound) X 100 % ­ Example) What is the composition of Ca (OH) 2? 

­ Formula Weight = 74.1 g/mol 

­ Ca = 40.078

­ 2 H= 2.016 

­ 2 O= 32.000 

­ Add ALL THE ELEMENTS ATOMIC WEIGHT TOGETHER TO GET THE  FORMULA WEIGHT.

­ %Ca = (1) (40.0)/ 74.1 X 100% 

­ = 54.08  54% Ca

∙ Percent composition data can be used to calculate an empirical formula.  ∙ Empirical vs Molecular formula:

­ Empirical: show ONLY THE SIMPLEST ration of atoms in the formula. ­ Almost all ionic compounds are represented by their empirical formulas.  ­ Molecular: show the actual composition of a molecule. 

­ Example) Ethylene glycol: 

­ Molecular formula = C2H6O2

­ Condensed formula = HOCH2CH2OH

­ Empirical formula = CH3O

­ Main component in anti­ freeze. 

­ Example) H2O = Empirical & molecular formula.

­ Example) H2O2 = molecular, the empirical formula = HO

­ Example) NO2 = empirical & molecular formula.

­ Example) C6H1206 = molecular, the empirical formula = CH2O

­ Deriving an empirical formula: 

1) Convert mass percent to mass.

2) Convert mass to moles.

3) Find mole ratio.

4) Convert to whole – number ratio of A to B. 

∙ Calculate formula from % composition: 

­ Example) 30.4% N + 69.6% O = 100

­ 30.3 g N (1 mol/ 14g) = 2.17 mol N atom. 

­ 69.6 g O (1 mol/ 16 g) = 4.35 mol O atom. 

­ 4.35/ 2.17 = 2 mol O / 1 mol N = NO2

­ Example) A compound is found to be 64.83% carbon, 21.59% oxygen, and 13.59%  hydrogen. What is the empirical formula for this compound? 

­ (64.83 gC) ( 1 mol C / 12.011 g C) = 5.397 mol C 

­ (21.59 g O) (1 mol O/ 16.00g O) = 1.349 mol O

­ (13.59 g H) (1 mol H/ 1.007 g H) = 13.48 mol H

­ Divide each amount of mol by the lowest mol = 1.349 

­ 5.397 mol C/ 1.349 mol O =  4.001 mol C.

­ 13.48 mol H/ 1.349 mol O= 9.992 mol H

­ 1.349 mol O / 1.349 mol O= 1.000

­ The empirical formula is C4H10O

∙ What if the numbers are not whole numbers? 

­ Multiple each ratio by a whole number to get an even number formula subscripts.  ∙ For some compounds, the molecular formula is a multiple of the empirical formula.  ∙ Molar formula (g/mol) / empirical formula mass (g/mol) = n 

­ Molar mass / empirical formula mass = n 

∙ Determining molecular formula: 

­ The empirical formula weight for C4H10O is 74.12 g/mol

­ In a separate experiment the molar mass of the compound was determined to be 222.1 g/mol. 

­ What is the molecular formula? 

­ 222.1g/mol / 74.12 g/mol = 2.996 = 3 

­ (C4H10O) (3) = C12H30O3

 Points to consider:  

∙ Nicotine contains 74.0 % C, 8.65% H, 17.35% N. What is the empirical formula?  ­ 74. 0 g C ( 1 mol C/ 12.01 g) = 6.16 mol C 

­ 8.65 g H ( 1 mol H/ 1.00 g) = 8.58 mol H

­ 17.35 g N (1 mol N/ 14.00g) = 1.24 mol N

­ Divide each answer by the lowest number of atoms : 1.24 mol N

­ 6.16 mol C/ 1.24 mol N= 4.97 = 5 mol C

­ 8.58 mol H/ 1.25 mol N= 6.92 = 7 mol H

­ 1.24 mol N/ 1.24 mol N= 1.000 mol N 

­ Formula = C5H7N

∙ What elements belong to the alkali metals? 

­ Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, Fr. 

∙ Physical properties of bromine: freezes at ­7.2 Celsius, reddish liquid, a sample has a  volume of 25.0 mL. 

∙ Convert 183 nm to cm. 

­ 1.83 X 10*­5 cm. 

∙ If you entered a 50 km race how far would this be in miles? Use the conversion 5,280 ft = 1 mile, 12 in = 1 ft, 2.54 cm= 1 in. 

∙ Calcium ­40 and Chlorine­ 37 are alike because both have? 

­ The same number of neutrons. 

∙ An 11.93 g sample of Na contains about ____ atoms?

­ 11.93gNa (1 mol Na/ 23gNa) (6.02 x 10^23 atoms Na/ 1 mol Na) = 7.1819 x 10 ^24/  23 = 3.123 = 3.1 x 10^23. 

∙ With a metal, nitrogen forms ____ with a charge of ____ .

­ None. Nitrogen does not form ions. 

∙ Formula: Al2 (NO3)3

∙ Name & formulas: 

­ KClO4: potassium perchlorate

­ Mg(OH)2: magnesium hydroxide

­ CaHPO4: calcium hydrogen phosphate

­ MgSO3: magnesium sulfite

∙ Name K2S : potassium sulfide

∙ Name Cr(NO3)2: chromium (II) nitrate

∙ Name Cl2O: chlorine oxide

∙ What is the balanced chemical equation for the complete combustion of benzoic acid,  C6H5CO2H, to form carbon dioxide water? 

­ 2 C6H5CO2H(s) + 15 O2 (g)  14 CO2 (g) + 6H2O (g) 

∙ Which of the following compounds are soluble in water: NH4NO3, Fe2S3, CuCO3, and  SrCl2? 

­ NH4NO3 and SrCl2

∙ Write the equation for the reaction that occurs when the hydrogen sulfate ion behaves as  a Bronsted­ Lowry acid in water? 

­ Bronsted­ Lowry acid: “It donates protons in the form of a hydrogen ion (H+). This is  reinforced by the definition of an acid, which is a solution that has an excess of  hydrogen ions (H+). The Bronsted­Lowry base, on the other hand, is a solution that accepts protons.”  (https://study.com/academy/lesson/bronsted­lowry­acid­definition examples.html ) 

­ HSO4 –(aq) + H2O (l) ­­­ SO4 2­ (aq) + H3O + (aq)

∙ When a solution of solver fluoride is added to a solution of magnesium sulfate, both  silver sulfate and magnesium fluoride precipitate. 

∙ Alkaline earth metals: 

­ Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra. 

∙ Halogens: 

­ F, Cl, Br, I, At. 

∙ Nobel gases: 

­ He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe, Rn. 

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here