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UGA - CLAS - Clas 1020- Classical Mythology; Instructor: Dr. Thomas

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UGA - CLAS - Clas 1020- Classical Mythology; Instructor: Dr. Thomas

School: University of Georgia
Department: Classical Studies
Course: Classical Mythology
Professor: John Nicholson, Robert Harris
Term: Spring 2019
Tags: history and Greek Myth
Name: Clas 1020- Classical Mythology; Instructor: Dr. Thomas Biggs
Description: These notes are a general overview of the historical background to ancient Greece and are meant to provide historical context to the myths.
Uploaded: 01/28/2019
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background image Classics 1020­Classical Mythology  UGA (University of Georgia)  Instructor: Dr. Thomas Biggs Spring 2019 Notes on Ancient Greece Geography  Main land Greece divided into two parts: the Peloponnesus & the Balkan Peninsula Over 300 islands in the Aegean Sea that were Greek (e.g. Crete, Lesbos, Santorini, etc.) Colonies of the Greek city­states­ Southern Italy, parts of Anatolia (modern­day Turkey), Cyprus, Spain, North Africa, and Marseille, France   Main land Greece­relatively rocky and somewhat mountainous, and it was surrounded by the sea
­
The Greeks being surrounded by water eventually made them expert sailors to the rest of the  ancient world Greece was traditionally called Hellas by the ancient Greeks themselves Greek Historical Timeline 1. Neolithic Age: 7000­3000 B.C.E. Name for this age in world history means “new stone” age At this point in time in human history some of the very first agricultural practices  were being developed 
(this time period is not really significant to the study of Greek myth; the bronze  age is more important in terms of potential origins for Greek myth) 2. Bronze Age: 3000­1100 B.C.E.  Called Bronze Age because this was the historical time period in which the making  and use of bronze tools was prominent in much of the ancient world
background image Known to the Greeks who recorded the tales of the Iliad and Odyssey as the “Heroic  Age” because this is supposedly the time period in which heroes like Heracles existed and when major mythological events occurred like the Trojan War
Troy, if the war really did happen, fell ca. 1184 B.C.E.  Early Greek civilizations like the Minoans and Myceneans existed around this time 3. “Dark” Ages of Greece (& the rest of the Ancient World)­ 1100­800 B.C.E. Called the Dark Ages by modern historians mainly because there are very little to no  written records on this period, unlike the Bronze age period before because the Early  Greek civilizations used to have writing systems like Linear B the architectural styles of the previous civilizations weren’t being practiced as much  (as in the major palaces of early Greek civilizations weren’t being built as heavily) past international trade and political agreements fell apart  some historians have speculated that the collapse might have been caused by  political, social, or economic instability throughout the ancient world; the fall might  have also been caused by serious climate change or other natural disasters 4. Archaic Age: 800­450 B.C.E. This is the age in which we see the works of Homer and Hesiod appear; also Greek  hymnals originate from this period  Famous cities of ancient Greece like Athens are born Democracy was born in this age 5. Classical Age: 480­323 B.C.E.  In this age one of the biggest historical events that happened were the Persian Wars  Much of what we understand about Classical Greek culture comes from the ancient  Greek city­state Athens  Athenian architecture, poetry, drama, and sculpture are iconic for describing this age
The dramas are heavily important for the study of Greek mythology because  many of these dramas recorded Greek myths that had been previously passed on  orally  323 B.C.E. is the end of this age because of the death of Alexander III of Macedon  (a.k.a. Alexander the Great) 
The aftermath of Alexander’s conquest was the launch of the Hellenic Age (a  globalized Mediterranean under Greek culture, trade, and language)

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School: University of Georgia
Department: Classical Studies
Course: Classical Mythology
Professor: John Nicholson, Robert Harris
Term: Spring 2019
Tags: history and Greek Myth
Name: Clas 1020- Classical Mythology; Instructor: Dr. Thomas Biggs
Description: These notes are a general overview of the historical background to ancient Greece and are meant to provide historical context to the myths.
Uploaded: 01/28/2019
6 Pages 62 Views 49 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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