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Clemson - MUSC - Study Guide - Midterm

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Clemson - MUSC - Study Guide - Midterm

School: Clemson University
Department: Music
Course: Music Appreciation
Term: Spring 2019
Tags: Music Appreciation
Name: UNIT 1 STUDY GUIDE
Description: This is an overview of the necessary terms and information for the first midterm. In addition, there is an explanation of what to know for the listening portion of the exam.
Uploaded: 01/31/2019
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background image CHAPTER ONE­RHYTHM, METER, TEMPO Rhythm o Rhythm is the actual arrangement of durations (long and short notes) in a  particular melody or some other musical passage Beats and Accents o Beats provide the basic unit of measurement for time in music  They are simple pulses being signaled by waving, tapping, or dancing is 
the music’s beat
o Accents are the stressing of a note Example: playing a note louder or softer than others Accented: strong Unaccented: weak o To beat time is not only to measure time according to a regular pulse, but also to  organize it Meter o Meter is any recurring pattern of strong and weak beats It is a strong/weak pattern repeated again and again  o Measure is each occurrence of this repeated pattern, consisting of a principal  strong beat and one or more weaker beats o Duple meter is when the beats are grouped in twos or fours Instantly familiar in marches o Triple meter is when the beats are grouped in threes o Often the main beats of duple and triple meter are subdivided into quicker pulses This usually happens by dividing the main beat into either twos or three Simple meter: when the main beats are divided in twos Compound meter: dividing the main beats in three; there are two or
three main beats and six or nine quicker ones
Rhythm and Meter o Rhythm refers to: Entire time aspect of music Particular arrangements of long and short notes in a musical passage o Musical rhythms need not always coincide with the regular beats of the meter Can result in all kinds f variety, tension, and excitement  o Musical notation has developed a conventional system of signs to indicate relative durations (long and short notes) Combining various signs is the way of indicating rhythms o Naturally, meter is strongly stressed in music designed to stimulate regular body  movements o Nonmetrical movements are when the rhythm suggests no underlying pattern of  strong and weak beats at all 
background image Syncopation o Syncopation is the accenting of certain beats of the meter that are ordinarily  unaccented Tempo o Tempo is the speed of music  o In metrical music, the tempo is the rate at which the basic, regular beats of the  meter follow one another o Tempo can be expressed exactly and measured by the metronome A metronome is a mechanical or electrical device that ticks out beats at 
any desired tempo 
o Common tempo indications Adagio­ slow Andante­ on the slow side, but not too slow Moderato­ moderate Allegretto­ on the fast side, but not too fast Allegro­ fast Presto­ very fast o Less common tempo indicators Largo, lento, grave­ slow, very slow Larghetto­ somewhat faster than largo Andantino­ somewhat faster than andante Vivace, vivo­ lively Molto allegro­ faster than allegro Prestissimo­ very fast indeed
background image CHAPTER TWO­DYNAMICS, TONE COLOR, ORCHESTRA INSTRUMENTS Pitch o Frequency is the rate of sound vibration o Pitch is the quality of sound, which is recognized instinctively  Low pitches result from long vibrating elements High pitches result from short vibrating elements  o High and low pitches are divided in chorus in four groups Sopranos (high females) Altos (low females) Tenor (high males) Bass (low males) Dynamics o Dynamics the level of sound Loud vs soft o Main categories of dynamics Pianissimo (pp)­ very soft Piano (p)­ soft Mezzo piano (mp)­ medium soft Mezzo forte (mf)­ medium loud Forte (f)­ loud Fortissimo (ff)­ very loud o Changes in dynamics can be subtle/gradual or sudden Crescendo: growing sound Decrescendo/diminuendo: diminishing sound Tone Color o Tone color/timbre is the quality of a particular instrument, voice, or combination  of instruments of voices o Overtone: in acoustics, a secondary vibration in a sound producing body, which  contributes to tone color They are much softer than the main vibrations o Tone color is the most easily recognized of all musical elements The most distinctive tone color is the human voice  Musical Instruments o Different voices and different instruments produce different tone colors, or  timbres o Four groups: stringed instruments, woodwinds, brass, percussion Stringed Instruments o Produce their sound by means of taut strings attached to a sound box o Pizzicato is when strings can be plucked on bowed instruments for special effects

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School: Clemson University
Department: Music
Course: Music Appreciation
Term: Spring 2019
Tags: Music Appreciation
Name: UNIT 1 STUDY GUIDE
Description: This is an overview of the necessary terms and information for the first midterm. In addition, there is an explanation of what to know for the listening portion of the exam.
Uploaded: 01/31/2019
9 Pages 60 Views 48 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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