Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

OSU - CLAS - Class Notes - Week 4

Created by: Taylor Snyder Elite Notetaker

> > > > OSU - CLAS - Class Notes - Week 4

OSU - CLAS - Class Notes - Week 4

School: Ohio State University
Department: Classical Studies
Course: Classical Mythology
Term: Spring 2019
Tags: Greek Mythology and mythology
Name: Mythology W4
Description: These notes cover Ovid's book 4 and the structures and themes talked about in class that will be on the exam.
Uploaded: 02/02/2019
5 5 3 58 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 3 of a 7 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image 01/29/19
Book 4 outline:
Frame narrative: Stitching circle of the Minyades 
Pyramid and Thisbe
Mars and Venus 
Sol and Leucothoe
Salmacis and Hermaphroditus
“Alcithoe, however, Minyas’ daughter would have no part in Bacchic orgies; further, she was 
rash enough to say the god was really no son of jobe. Her sisters sided with her” (page 81)
Minyas’ and Cadmus both founders of Thebes.  A Bacchis Festival Bacchis religion is seen as a equalizing force. There’s a wildness about Bacchus 
rather than a civilness. Women in a wild state and dressed the same.
Apollo thinks about how Daphne would look like if she was improperly dressed.  Bacchic Imagery: Thyrsus “A wand” It is a stick with something that looks like a pinecone on top of it, and a 
ribbon tied to it. It has a phallic appearance. Other gods carry rods or 
staff, it’s a symbol of authority. 
Priest says to have a festival in a specific way.  Idea that greek gods are not “good”. They behave badly but are powerful. Myth is
about power. 
The Bacchic Procession­ idea that Bacchus is in a chariot pulled by some cat of 
some sort. Part of the ritual, in practice a statue of Bacchus would be put in the 
chariot to resemble it. 
Weaving is the most domestic act a woman could do. Sign of good domestic life.  These women decide they are going to tell stories while they are weaving.  The first story is Pyramus and Thisbe They are young lovers, living near each other, family does not approve. There is 
a small gap between walls and they manage to speak to each other. They decide
to run away together, Thisbe sees a lion and runs off. The lion has her veil, and 
Pyramus kills himself because he thinks the lion killed her. Thisbe finds him and 
kills herself as well. 
This story is of course resembling Romeo and Juliet. Shakespeare did 
base it on Pyramus and Thisbe.
Next story is Mars and Venus Venus is married to Vulcan, Venus and Ares have an affair, the sun catches 
them and tells vulcan. Vulcan traps them in a new in which all the gods can see 
them and laugh. 
Mars and Venus frequently are an item. Not married but this idea of an affair is 
not commonly reported. 
background image Ovid’s version comes from a story told in Homer’s Odyssey.  This idea that Venus is married to Hephaestus is interesting because it comes 
from an odyssey. It emphasizes an adulterous affair.
Myth and Ritual Association between Ares and Venus has resonances in wedding songs and 
magic practices. 
The Louvre “voodoo doll” would have been with a binding spell that holds the 
power of Ares and Aphrodite. 
Idea that they are natural counterparts for one another. Third story is about Sol and Leucothoe Venus ruins a love affair of the Sun’s. The sun was distracted by Leucothoe that he was messing up time. He forgets his duties and disguises himself as her mother to talk to her. He reveals himself and she is impressed.  Clytie was jealous and revealed it to Leucothoe father. He is not impressed and punishes her. He buried her and gave her a tomb of 
heavy weight of sand. She is buried alive. 
“No sight more pitiful had dimmed the Sun­god’s eyes since Phaethon fell to his 
blazing death”
Not bizarre punishment at the time. Clytie is also punished and the sun was not eager to return to her. She mourns 
for 9 days without eating. She follows the sun like a sunflower turns to the sun. 
She turns into a Heliotrope (another type of flower). 
Leucothoe turns into the frankenstein bush. Giving her immortality. Sun­god Sol/Helios He is a titan and has various lovers/offspring. Various lovers include Perse ­> Circe, Pasiphae, and Perses Clymene­> Phaethon (who died from riding the chariot) Herd of immortal cattle Associated with Apollo, who is also seen as the sun­god. Roughly the same 
figure but when separate, Apollo is a olympian and Sol is the titan. 
Finally, the last tale is Salmacis and Hermaphroditus Herma. Is son of Hermes and Aphrodite Pursued by Salmacis Resists her, Salmacis prays for them to be joined. The two merge, the site of the event develops the reputation of making men 
womanlike. 
They become part man part woman. It happens at a pool and is seen as making 
men feminized if they swim in it. 
The end of the daughters of Minyas
background image Believe Bacchus is not a god. They hear the clash of symbols, and ivy starts 
flowing in the house.
They become bats and fly away.  Athamas and Ino Juno is angry about Bacchis power. Her anger is a driving force She decides to fight madness with madness She goes to the underworld and recruits a fury to drive Athamas and Ino mad.  Asks Neptune to turn Ino and her son into gods. Family starts tearing themselves
apart, Ino and her son is flung off a cliff. This is when Venus asks to turn them 
into Sea gods.
Juno in the underworld  Tityos He was punished and cast down and his organs are picked out. Tantalus Punished by having a burning thirst and hunger. He serves human flesh 
to a god which never goes well. 
Sisyphus He must push a boulder up a hill and it always rolls back down.  Ixion Attached to a wheel that’s on fire. His crime was trying to sleep with Hera,
wife of jupiter.
Juno encounters these bad gods in the underworld and takes Inspiration.  “She called to her the furies, the night­born sisters, dreadful, implacable.”  They have black serpents as hair.  The fury shows up at Ino and Athamas’ home. The fury was named 
Tisiphone. The two felt nothing physically but went insane. 
Other theban women try to throw themselves off the cliff after Ino but instead turn
to stones and seabirds.
Cadmus and Harmonia Cadmus after his exile made the city Thebes.  He did not know that his daughter, Ino and her son became sea­gods, and when 
he did he was very sad and wandered to Illyria. 
Cadmus prays to become a serpent and he does. Harmonia caresses him and 
becomes one as well.
He slayed a serpent and then became one in his end. You could say it was a 
punishment from mars because the serpent he slayed belonged to mars. 
Color of mulberries (85)­ Thisbe stab themselves under a mulberry tree which turns the 
white to red. Which is why mulberries are red.
Hermaphroditic people (93) Origin of gods Palaemon and Leucothea (99) ­ Minor sea­gods that used to be Ino and 
her son. 

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Ohio State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
7 Pages 96 Views 76 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Ohio State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Ohio State University
Department: Classical Studies
Course: Classical Mythology
Term: Spring 2019
Tags: Greek Mythology and mythology
Name: Mythology W4
Description: These notes cover Ovid's book 4 and the structures and themes talked about in class that will be on the exam.
Uploaded: 02/02/2019
7 Pages 96 Views 76 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to OSU - Class Notes - Week 4
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to OSU - Class Notes - Week 4

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here