×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to MSU - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to MSU - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

MSU / Bioscience / BIO 112 / What is the composition of atoms?

What is the composition of atoms?

What is the composition of atoms?

Description

Chapter 2 & 3 Study Guide for Exam 1 Principles of Biology


What is the composition of atoms?



Chapter 2: Water and Carbon ­ The Chemical Basis of Life

Atoms are composed of:

● Protons: positively charged particles

○ Located in the nucleus 

● Neutrons: neutral particles

○ Located in the nucleus 

● Electrons: negatively charged particles

○ Located in orbitals around the nucleus Don't forget about the age old question of How can i convert a number 10 or greater to scientific notation?


Where are electrons located?



● Most of an atom’s volume is empty space

Electronegative (O,N,F,S)

The atomic number: 

● Every different atom has a characteristic (UNIQUE) number of protons in the  nucleus

● Atos with the same atomic number

○ Have the same chemical properties

○ Belong to the same element

    Isotopes: Don't forget about the age old question of What is the formula to compute for producer surplus?

● Isotopes are formed by an element with different numbers of neutrons Mass number:

● The mass number is determined by the number of protons + neutrons 


How are isotopes formed?



Electrons move around atomic nucleus in specific regions called orbitals ● Each orbital can hold up to two electrons

● Orbitals are grouped into levels called electron shells

○ Electron shells are numbered 1,2,3, and so on

■ Numbers indicate their relative distance from the nucleus

■ Smaller numbers are closer to the nucleus

○ Each electron shell contains a specific number of orbitals

■ Electron shell with a single orbital can hold up to two electrons ■ Shell with four orbitals can contain up to eight electrons

○ Electrons of an atom fill the innermost cshells first and then the outer  shells If you want to learn more check out What does the 14th amendment (1866) state?
Don't forget about the age old question of Which local show was created by dennis mahon?

Chemical Bonding

● Unfilled electron orbitals allow formation of chemical bonds

○ Atoms are most stable when each electron orbital is filled

○ Molecules are substances held together by covalent bonds

Types of Bonds

Covalent bonds 

● Molecules

● Each atom’s unpaired valence electrons are shared by both nuclei to fill their  orbitals

● Electrons are not always shared equally

● An atom in a molecule with high electronegativity Don't forget about the age old question of What is the label for candidates who are affiliated with no party?

○ Holds electrons more tightly ­­ has partial negative

Carbon is likely to bond with anything because it want to fill their outermost shell.  Two types of covalent bonds

● A = sharing of equal e 

○ Most covalent bonds

● B=/= sharing is unequal of e

Differences in electronegativity dictate how electrons are distributed in covalent bonds ● Nonpolar covalent bond

○ Electrons are evenly shared between two atoms

○ The bond is symmetrical

○ Means water repels

■ Example oil will stay with each other

● Polar covalent bond

○ Electrons are asymmetrically shared

○ Attracted to water

■ Water is polar

○ Means water gets in between it and separates the bonds

Ions and Ionic Bonds 

● Rule of forming a bond is that they want to complete their outer shell ○ All elements are neutral and have equal number if protons and electrons.  If lose electron becomes one less negative therefore positive.

■ If gains an electron becomes one more negative therefore negative ● To form Ionic bonds, must be an ion

○ An ion is an atom or molecule that carries a charge

● Cation (+)

○ A cation is an atom that loses an electron and becomes positively charged ● Anion (­) Don't forget about the age old question of How does dehydration affect acid-catalyzed aldol?

○ An anion is an atom that gains an electron and becomes negatively  charged

● Ionic bond

○ The result attraction between oppositely charged ions (+) and (­)

Hydrogen Bonds 

● Water is the best solution

● Hydrogen bonds are weak electrical attractions between the partially negative  oxygen of one water molecule

○ Even though weak bonds, you have to boil at 100 degrees celsius 

because they have a lot of of hydrogen bonds which are harder to break ○ Collectively hard to break ­ stronger together

● And the partially positive hydrogen of a different water molecule ● They can also form between a water molecule and any other polar molecule

Hydrophilic ­ wants to associate with water

● Are ions and polar molecules that stay insolution

● They stay in solution because of their interactions with water

Questions?

Valence? What is valence?

Bonds? How to count valence

Chapter 3: Protein Structure and Function

PH of blood is 7.4

All proteins are made from 20 amino acid building blocks

● Amino acIds have a central carbon atom that bonds to  (H, NH2, COOH) (R group)

● Carbon has two lines because carbon wants to form four bonds and oxygen  wants to form two.

● R is just a side chain that people don’t feel like predicting

● Acids donate H+ and that’s what it means to be an acid

○ Hydrochloric acid is the most dangerous acid because it donates the  highest amount of  H+’s

● Sodium donates valence electron and Chl accepted it Something goes up  another thing goes down, called homeostasis

Non polar characteristics

● R group must have only type A (equal sharing) covalent bond in order to be Non Polar

● The rings

Four elements that can behave electronegativity

● Oxygen 

● Nitrogen (unequal­ cuz hogging)

● Sulfur

● Water

Macromolecule is when the molecule is made or synthesized in a specific way in which  there is a subunit that is continuously attached

● Made up of parts, subunits or monomers, bonded together

● Monomer (subunitis) + bonds (Polymerization)

○ Polymerization ­ means molecule is growing one step at a time (no  skipping)

● Requires energy

● Is nonspontaneous

Monomers polymerize through condensation (dehydration) reactions ● That release a water molecule

Hydrolysis is reverse reaction

● Breaks polymers apart by adding a water molecule

Types of Bonds

Covalent bonds 

● Molecules

● Each atom’s unpaired valence electrons are shared by both nuclei to fill their  orbitals

● Electrons are not always shared equally

● An atom in a molecule with high electronegativity

○ Holds electrons more tightly ­­ has partial negative

Carbon is likely to bond with anything because it want to fill their outermost shell.  Two types of covalent bonds

● A = sharing of equal e 

○ Most covalent bonds

● B=/= sharing is unequal of e

Differences in electronegativity dictate how electrons are distributed in covalent bonds ● Nonpolar covalent bond

○ Electrons are evenly shared between two atoms

○ The bond is symmetrical

○ Means water repels

■ Example oil will stay with each other

● Polar covalent bond

○ Electrons are asymmetrically shared

○ Attracted to water

■ Water is polar

○ Means water gets in between it and separates the bonds

Ions and Ionic Bonds 

● Rule of forming a bond is that they want to complete their outer shell ○ All elements are neutral and have equal number if protons and electrons.  If lose electron becomes one less negative therefore positive.

■ If gains an electron becomes one more negative therefore negative ● To form Ionic bonds, must be an ion

○ An ion is an atom or molecule that carries a charge

● Cation (+)

○ A cation is an atom that loses an electron and becomes positively charged ● Anion (­)

○ An anion is an atom that gains an electron and becomes negatively  charged

● Ionic bond

○ The result attraction between oppositely charged ions (+) and (­)

Hydrogen Bonds 

● Water is the best solution

● Hydrogen bonds are weak electrical attractions between the partially negative  oxygen of one water molecule

○ Even though weak bonds, you have to boil at 100 degrees celsius  because they have a lot of of hydrogen bonds which are harder to break ○ Collectively hard to break ­ stronger together

● And the partially positive hydrogen of a different water molecule ● They can also form between a water molecule and any other polar molecule

Hydrophilic ­ wants to associate with water

● Are ions and polar molecules that stay insolution

● They stay in solution because of their interactions with water

Questions?

Valence? What is valence?

Bonds? How to count valence

Chapter 3: Protein Structure and Function

PH of blood is 7.4

All proteins are made from 20 amino acid building blocks

● Amino acIds have a central carbon atom that bonds to  (H, NH2, COOH) (R group)

● Carbon has two lines because carbon wants to form four bonds and oxygen  wants to form two.

● R is just a side chain that people don’t feel like predicting

● Acids donate H+ and that’s what it means to be an acid

○ Hydrochloric acid is the most dangerous acid because it donates the  highest amount of  H+’s

● Sodium donates valence electron and Chl accepted it Something goes up  another thing goes down, called homeostasis

Non polar characteristics

● R group must have only type A (equal sharing) covalent bond in order to be Non Polar

● The rings

Four elements that can behave electronegativity

● Oxygen 

● Nitrogen (unequal­ cuz hogging)

● Sulfur

● Water

Macromolecules in our cells

● Proteins → “Do the Work of the cell”

○ Insulin, lowers levels of blood glucose

● Carbs

● Nucleic Acids

Lipids are LEFT OUT. They are NOT Macromolecules, instead they are just molecules you find in the cell. Most lipids are made (smallest has 12 carbons which is a lot) and  are not considered being attached to subunits

Molecules must be constructed by monomers by adding and adding.  Every protein has its own unique primary structure

1 Structure → linear sequence (peptide) → Directional Amino → CARBOXYL 2 Structure → 2-D (Hydrogen [H]) → NH3+ → COO

3 Structure → 3-D (R-Groups)

Quaternary (4) → More than one subunit (R-Groups)

Condensation → H2O Monomer → Polymer

Hydrolysis → + H2O Polymer → Monomer

Adding H2O 

What do Proteins Do?

● Proteins are crucial to most tasks required for cells to exist

● Catalysis

○ Enzymes speeds up chemical reactions

■ We use enzymes when we digest food

■ We could eat without them, but this would take much longer, 10  hours. With enzymes its 3 hours

● Defense

○ Antibodies and complement proteins attack pathogens, attacks antigens ● Movement

○ Motor and contractile proteins move the cell or molecules within the cell

Mutation: Any time that the sequence has been changed

If don’t work failed

Quick Facts:

2 different ways to read one line (left and right)

Protein sequence must be read from amino terminus to the last carboxyl terminus If we allowed scientist to read any which way there would be a misinformation of  sequence ­­ primary structure is going to have a directional amino

If an amino acid has 50 protein total, can they substitute the amino acid more than 

once. There is only 20, if they couldn’t substitute they would only ever have 20 proteins.

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here