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UCSB - LING - ling 107 week 5 notes - Class Notes

Created by: ameliabellejones Elite Notetaker

Schools > University of California Santa Barbara > OTHER > LING > UCSB - LING - ling 107 week 5 notes - Class Notes

UCSB - LING - ling 107 week 5 notes - Class Notes

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background image LING 107--Intro to Phonology    [coronals]  ● Dentals, retroflex, alveolar, palato-alveolar  ● Blade coronals (aka laminal) are [+distributed]  ● Tip coronals are [-distributed]  ● If something is articulated at or fronter than the alveolar ridge, it is [+anterior]  ● If something is articulated behind the alveolar ridge, it is [-anterior]  ○ Laminal dentals: [+distributed, +anterior]  ○ Apical alveolars: [-distributed, +anterior]  ○ Retroflexes: [-distributed, -anterior]  ○ Palato-alveolars: [+distributed, -anterior]  [stridents]  ● /s/ /z/ /ts/ /dz/ /ʃ/ /ʒ/ /tʃ/ /dʒ/  ● Air passes through the groove in the tongue and strikes the back of the teeth [+strident]  ● Also called sibilants, but that only refers to fricatives rather than affricates  ● Acoustically very noisy  ● If a word that ends in a strident takes a plural form, the plural will be realized as [əz]  [lateral]  ● Lateral approximants (/l/ /ɭ/ /ʎ/ /ʟ/) and lateral fricatives (/ɬ/ /ɮ/) [+lateral]  ● Air flow escapes over one or both sides of the tongue, rather than down the center    Labials  [round]  ● These include consonants with lip rounding, not just round vowels  ○ /kʷ/ [+dorsal +round]  ○ /pʷ/ [+labial +round]  ○ /tʷ/ [+coronal +round]  [labiodental]  
background image ● These really only come into play in languages where bilabials and labiodentals contrast    Dorsals  ● We can describe dorsals by using vowel features of vowels that are articulated similarly  to these dorsal consonants  ○ Fronted velars are like /i/ : [+high -low -back]  ○ Velars are like /ɯ/ : [+high -low +back]  ○ Uvulars are like /ʌ/ : [-high -low +back  ○ Pharyngeals are like /ɑ/ : [-high +low +back]  ○ Palatals : [+coronal +dorsal]  ● Because they’re so similar, consonants and their similar vowels often assimilate  Secondary Articulations  ● Palatalization (/kʲ/) + [+dorsal +high -back]  ● Velarization (/sˠ/) + [+dorsal +high +back]  ● Labialization (/kʷ/) + [round]  Evidence for “Place” as a Group of Features  ● There is evidence that the place of a sound somewhat determines or is influenced by its  features  ● Nasals in English assimilate to the place of the next consonant  ○ /n/ → [ αplace] / __ [+consonantal αplace]  ○ If it’s dissimilation, can say [-αplace] / [+consonantal αplace]    Laryngeal Features  [voice]  ● Voiced sounds are [+voice] voiceless sounds are [-voice]  [spread glottis]  ● [h] and aspirated sounds plus some others are [+spread glottis]  ● Usually [+spread] if the sound is voiceless, but there are some voiced sounds with  [+spread] 

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School: University of California Santa Barbara
Department: OTHER
Course: Introduction to Phonology
Term: Winter 2019
Tags: phonology, alternations, ordering, and Rules
Name: ling 107 week 5 notes
Description: this goes over what was said in class and on the worksheets, with in depth explanations where I thought necessary
Uploaded: 02/06/2019
4 Pages 22 Views 17 Unlocks
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