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UVU - Phil 205G - Study Guide - Midterm

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UVU - Phil 205G - Study Guide - Midterm

School: Utah Valley University
Department: OTHER
Course: Ethics and Values
Professor: Shaun Lamarche
Term: Spring 2019
Tags: ethics, values, Kant, Morals, and duties
Name: Midterm Study Guide
Description: An overview of the last month of class
Uploaded: 02/07/2019
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background image 4 area’s of Normative Ethics:
*Virtue Theory
*Divine Command Theory
*Utilitarian Theory
*Duty Theory
things we are obligated to do. there is no exception for them:
moral laws
rules
duties
3 Propositions
1st proposition 
­ only actions done from a sense of duty have moral worth and are examples of
good will
2nd proposition: moral value or worth lies in ones intentions
3rd proposition: acting morally – having a good will – means putting your feelings and 
inclinations aside.  If my warm­ fuzzy feelings of love for all humanity are motivating me to do 
wonderful things, then great – my actions are just not morally valuable.
**consequences and feelings have no place in morality
**What should be motivating me? My sense of duty alone, my recognition that this is the right 
thing to do
.
Consequentialism: New approach to normative ethics.
Utilitarianizm: Most famous form of consequentialism 
*Argument: Utiliarians are pleasure seekers. It requires people act against their own happiness 
for happiness for greatest number of people
*Argument back: Actions are good in proportion that they promote the general happiness in the 
aggregate, not any one individual’s happiness, including my own
Jeremy Bentham: Founder of this movement. Act is moral if it produces happiness for greatest 
number of people.
egoistic: criticism of utilitarian moral philosophy. it claims it’s self centered.
the greatest happiness principle­ 
actions are good in proportion as they tend to promote 
happiness
­What is the summum bonum?
­the greatest good
­Why does Mill reject the intuitionist and inductivist views of morality?

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School: Utah Valley University
Department: OTHER
Course: Ethics and Values
Professor: Shaun Lamarche
Term: Spring 2019
Tags: ethics, values, Kant, Morals, and duties
Name: Midterm Study Guide
Description: An overview of the last month of class
Uploaded: 02/07/2019
2 Pages 129 Views 103 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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