×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UCR - Study Guide - Final
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UCR - Study Guide - Final

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UCR / Evolutionary Anthropology / ANTH 001 / What refers to the belief that one's culture is normal and superior to

What refers to the belief that one's culture is normal and superior to

What refers to the belief that one's culture is normal and superior to

Description

School: University of California Riverside
Department: Evolutionary Anthropology
Course: Cultural Anthropology
Professor: Garibaldi l
Term: Winter 2019
Tags: Anthropology, final, and exam
Cost: 50
Name: ANTHROPOLOGY 001 FINAL STUDY GUIDE!
Description: This is Professor Syvertsen's study guide that she posted on iLearn, however, I included all the answers for the material listed on her study guide. Good luck everyone! Previous link that I sent out was not working for people so I am re-uploading the study guide.
Uploaded: 03/12/2019
14 Pages 53 Views 4 Unlocks
Reviews

smorg010 (Rating: )

It was great


958913622 (Rating: )



ANTH 001: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology Dr. Syvertsen, winter 2019 Final exam guide


What refers to the belief that one's culture is normal and superior to others?



THE FINAL EXAM IS ON THE LAST DAY OF CLASS

The final is CUMULATIVE, but the main focus will be on the learning objectives in the syllabus and the following chapters: 7 (gender), 8 (sexuality), 9 (kinship), 10 (class), 12 (politics), religion (13), 14 (health) & 15 (arts).

Format: ~40 multiple choice questions; 882­E Series scantron, #2 pencil (No Pen)

• is the study of humans, past and 

present. To understand the full 

Syllabus:

∙ Course objectives 

∙ Students will be able to 

understand other cultures without judging them by the standards of  their own culture (relativistic 

perspective).


What commitment is required by holistic perspective?



∙ Students will be able to consider  the whole range of cross­cultural  variation when formulating 

research questions and 

hypotheses about human 

behavior and societies 

(comparative perspective).

∙ Students will be able to 

understand that elements of 

culture are interrelated and 

should be understood within 

context (holistic perspective).

∙ Students will be able to 

understand what culture is and  how it shapes how humans 

experience, perceive, and act in  the world (culture concept).

∙ Students will be able to 

understand why and how 


How does epigenetics influence culture?



anthropologists study cross

cultural variation (methodological  approaches). If you want to learn more check out How do you use right hand rule for cross product?

∙ Students will be able to 

understand how culture shapes  their lives and that of others 

around them (reflexivity).

Chapter 1:

• Anthropology 

sweep and complexity of cultures  across all of human history,  anthropology draws and builds  upon knowledge from the social  and biological sciences as well as the humanities and physical  sciences.

• 4­field approaches (name and  define each) 

• Physical anthropology = the  study of humans from a 

biological perspective, 

particularly how they evolved  over time and adapted to their  environments.

• Archaeology = the investigation  of the human past by means of  excavating and analyzing  Don't forget about the age old question of What is the layout of the solar system?

artifacts.

• Linguistic anthropology = the  study of human language in the  past and the present. Don't forget about the age old question of What is the criteria for panic disorder?

• Cultural anthropology = is the  study of people’s communities,  behaviors, beliefs, and 

institutions, including how people make meaning as they live, work,  and play together.

• Medical anthropology 

• The cross­cultural study of health  and healing.

• Applied anthropology 

• Anthropologists that work outside the academic setting to apply the  strategies and insights of 

anthropology directly to current  world problems.

• Ethnocentrism 

• Belief that own culture is normal,  natural, superior to others.We also discuss several other topics like What characterizes creep as mass movement?

• Holistic perspective  

• Commitment to look at the whole  picture of human life – culture,  biology, language, history – 

across space and time.

• Fieldwork 

• A primary research strategy in  cultural anthropology typically  involving living and interacting  with a community of people over  an extended period to better 

understand their lives.

• Agency 

• Central role of individuals and  groups in determining their own  lives, even in the face of 

overwhelming structures of 

power.

• ‘Studying up’ 

• Conducting research on elites by  examining financial institutions,  aid and development agencies,  medical laboratories, and doctors. • Emic perspective Don't forget about the age old question of What is the job dendritic cells?

• Insider view – how do people  understand their own experiences in the world?

Chapter 2:

• Culture – what is it? What is it not? • A system of knowledge, beliefs,  patterns of behavior, artifacts, 

and institutions that are created,  learned, shared, and contested by a group of people. It is not a 

“static” thing that can be ascribed to people.

• Components of culture (norms, values, symbols, mental maps) 

• Norms   =   ideas   or   rules about   how   people   should

behave   in   particular

situations or toward certain

other people.

• Values = beliefs about what is important; what makes a

good life; what is true, right,

and beautiful.

• Symbols   =   anything   that represents something else.

• Mental   maps   =   cultural classifications of what kinds of   people  and   things   exist, and   the   assignment   of meaning   to   those classifications. Don't forget about the age old question of What is u substitution used for?

• Major frameworks of how culture  concept developed in anthropology • Early evolutionary frameworks = unilinear cultural evolution from less evolved to more evolved. • American historical 

particularism = cultures develop because of unique histories. • British structural functionalism  = how structures function to  keep system balanced.

• Culture and meaning = 

interpretivist, “thick 

description.”

• Power 

• The ability or potential to bring  about change through action or  influence, either one’s own or a  group institution.

• Hegemony 

• Power to create consent and  agreement within a population  without the use of threat or force. • Human agency 

• Free will, action, and/or 

contestation.

• Structure vs agency 

• Individuals and groups have the  power to contest cultural norms,  values, mental maps of reality,  symbols, institutions, and 

structures of power.

• Epigenetics – know basic definition and that factors can influence  transmission of genetic information over generations 

• Examines the ways in which the  environment one is born into  can directly affect the 

expression of genes during  one’s lifetime. Epigenetic 

markers may change in 

response to processes that  anthropologists study: nutrition, stress, disease, social 

inequality, migration etc.

Chapter 3 & Dr. Syvertsen’s  lectures on anthropological  research methods:

∙ Basic historical development of  research methods in anthropology ∙ Early accounts of encounters  with “others.” 19th century 

colonialism gave rise to 

“armchair anthropologists.

∙ Know the major contributions  of selected anthropologists: 

o Franz Boas 

­work among Native 

Americans.

­4­field approach.

­Salvage ethnography.

­Cultural relativism = 

understanding a   group’s 

beliefs and practices within 

their own cultural contexts, 

without making judgments.

o Bronislaw Malinowski 

­established

ethnographic fieldwork

as a practice.

­Trobriand Islands.

­Argonauts   of   the

Western Pacific.

­Kula Ring = system of

social   exchange   and

networking.

o E.E. Evans­Pritchard 

British  social  

anthropology

ethnography   of   the

Nuer in Sudan.

Structural

functionalism.

Study culture

scientifically

synchronic   approach,

limit   consideration   of

historical   context   –

compare   work   across

cultures.

o Margaret Mead 

public anthropology.

fieldwork   on

adolescent   girls   in

Samoa.

Feminist.

Gender   roles   not

biologically

determined.

o Zora Neal Hurston 

studied with Boas and 

Benedict.

African American literature, 

anthropology, struggles in the  south U.S, Haitian voodoo.

“Mules and Men”

“Their Eyes Were Watching 

God”

“Tell My Horse: Voodoo and  Life in Haiti and Jamaica”

o Nancy Scheper­Hughes 

“Death Without Weeping.”

Engaged anthropology = using strategies and methods of 

anthropology to critique 

power and inequality, and 

address challenges in local 

communities and the world at  large.

Global organ trade.

∙ Ethnographic fieldwork 

• A primary research strategy in  cultural anthropology typically  involving living and interacting  with a community of people over  an extended period to better  understand their lives.

∙ Participant observation 

∙ A key anthropological research  strategy involving both 

participation in and observation  of the daily life of the people  being studied.

∙ Fieldnotes 

∙ Running account of observations, activities, etc.

∙ Polyvocality 

∙ The practice of using many  different voices in ethnographic  writing and research question  development, allowing the reader  to hear more directly from the  people in the study.

∙ Reflexivity 

∙ Self­reflection on the experience  of doing fieldwork.

∙ What are the major differences  between quantitative, qualitative, 

and ethnographic methods? 

∙ Quantitative focuses on 

measurement and 

quantification, qualitative 

focuses on lived experiences; 

behaviors, beliefs, meaning 

and emotions, ethnographic 

focuses on cultural context.

∙ What is an oral history interview? ∙ A qualitative research method  used by some anthropologists  which involves interviewing a 

person or group to get an inside  perspective into what it was like  to live in a particular time or to  live as the member of a particular  group within a society.

∙ What are some best practices when conducting an interview? 

o  Use of probes 

Use neutral agreement or 

acknowledgment of the 

statement.

Silent probe.

Chapter 4:

∙ Basic definition of language 

∙ A system of communication  organized by rules that uses 

symbols such as words, sounds,  and gestures to convey 

information.

∙ Language, Culture & Thought –  Chomsky vs Sapir­Whorf hypothesis ∙ Noam Chomsky = humans share  a similar language ability and, 

thus, ways of thinking. Language  is essentially hardwired into the  human brain. It is an innate 

capability that we all have as 

human beings. Thus, this 

hardwiring leads to a “universal  grammar.”

∙ Sapir­Whorf hypothesis = 

different languages create 

different ways of thinking. 

Languages is a form of 

classification for the world 

Repeat back what they have  said.

Ask for more information.

Ask for clarification.

o  Key issues to practice 

Avoid interrupting the 

informants.

Don’t cut off the discussion. Follow up on topics the 

informant introduces.

Change topics if informant is  visibly agitated or upset.

∙ Holmes article – what kind of data  is his article based on? What did his article describe? What was the  ethical decision he faced in his  fieldwork and what did he decide to  do? 

∙ Author engages in participant  observation while gathering  qualitative data about his journey to cross the U.S/Mexico border  with a group. He was faced with  the decision of whether the 

journey was worth the risk of  getting captured, but ultimately  went through with the process.

around us. If different languages  make use of different 

classifications, then they 

fundamentally change how we  understand the world. Native  American language Hopi example has only two tenses for the past  and present.

∙ Sociolinguistics 

∙ Study of the ways culture shapes  language and language shapes  culture.

∙ Standard language vs dialect ∙ Standard language = spelling,  pronunciation, and grammar are  codified. Also a statement of  power. Whereas, a dialect is the  nonstandard variation of a 

language.

∙ Examples of how language  intersects with power? 

∙ Due to economic and 

political power wielded 

by the Western world, 

Western languages have

begun to supplant other 

languages around the 

world.

∙ Age, race, ethnicity, 

sexuality, gender, class.

∙ Hypo­descendant 

∙ Sometimes called the “one drop  of blood rule” the assignment of  children of racially mixed unions  to the subordinate group.

∙ Individual racism vs. Institutional  racism – definitions and examples? ∙ Individual racism example of  microaggressions. Institutional  racism examples include 

education, housing, courts, and  prison systems.

∙ Microaggressions 

∙ Common, everyday verbal and  behavioral indignities.

∙ Racial ideology 

∙ Popular sets of ideas about race  that allows the discriminatory  behaviors of individuals and 

institutions to seem reasonable,  rational, and normal.

∙ What are some of the legacies of slavery & racism in the US? 

∙ Jim crow laws. Marriage was  outlawed between whites and  nonwhites. Loving vs. Virginia case of 1967.

∙ Is Brazil a multiracial utopia? Anti blackness and the Brazilian  

election reading 

∙ NO, there is still a big divide  between the black Brazilians and white Brazilians. Fear of blacks  taking over and committing 

extreme crimes.

Chapter 5:

∙ Race – how do anthropologists  understand race? What is a  

biocultural approach to  

understanding race? 

∙ Anthropologists view race  as a framework of 

categories created to divide  human populations, but it is  arbitrary. The bio­cultural 

approach to race is 

biologically separate races 

DO NOT EXIST. As humans 

we are more genetically 

alike than we are different.

∙ Racism 

o Institutional vs individual 

Racism 

Institutional racism = 

patterns by which racial 

inequality is structured 

through key cultural 

institutions, policies, and 

systems. Individual racism 

= personal prejudiced 

beliefs and discriminatory 

actions based on race.

o What are the social and 

health implications of 

racism? 

It creates or reproduces 

unequal access to power, 

privilege, resources, and 

opportunities.

o Trevor Noah’s “when is the  right time for black people  

to protest?” 

Institutional and 

individual racism evolving

from NFL football players 

protesting police brutality

in the United States.

∙ Genotype 

∙ All the genes he or she carries. ∙ Phenotype 

∙ How your genes are expressed. ∙ Dr. Jablonski’s TED talk – why  does skin color vary? How is skin  color adaptive? 

∙ Natural selection from UVB rays  and geography are the causes  for skin color variation. Skin  color is adaptive through the 

production of melanin (vitamin D  production that acts on the 

destruction of folate).

∙ Colonialism – impact of slave trade ∙ A nation­state extends political,  economic, and military power 

beyond its own borders over an  extended period of time to secure  access to raw materials, cheap  labor and markets in other 

countries or regions.

∙ Miscegenation 

∙ A demeaning historical term for  interracial marriage.

∙ White supremacy & white privilege ∙ White supremacy = the belief that  whites are biologically different  from and superior to people of  other races. White privilege = an  invisible package of unearned 

assets.

∙ Jim Crow laws 

∙ Provided legal justification for  segregated schools, work, and  public placed on the basis of 

white supremacist ideology.

Chapter 6:

∙ Ethnicity – multiple meanings, how anthropologists define 

∙ A sense of historical, cultural,  and sometimes ancestral 

connection to a group of people who are imagined to be distinct  from those outside the group.

∙ Origin myth 

∙ A story told about the founding  and history of a particular group  to reinforce a sense of common  identity.

∙ Ethnic boundary marker 

∙ A practice or belief, such as food,  clothing, language, shared name,  or religion, used to signify who is  in a group and who is not.

∙ Genocide 

∙ The deliberate and systematic  destruction of an ethnic or 

religious group.

∙ Melting pot vs Assimilation 

∙ Melting pot = a metaphor used to  describe the process of immigrant assimilation into U.S. dominant  culture. Assimilation = the 

process through which minorities  accept the patterns and norms of  the dominant culture and cease to exist as separate groups.

∙ Multiculturalism 

∙ A pattern of ethnic relations in  which new immigrants and their  children enculturate into the  dominant national culture and yet  retain an ethnic culture.

∙ State 

∙ An autonomous regional  structure of political, economic,  and military rule with a central  government authorized to make  laws and use force to maintain  order and defend its territory. ∙ Nation­state 

∙ A political entity, located within a  geographic territory with enforced borders, where the population  shares a sense of culture, 

ancestry, and destiny as a people. ∙ Citizenship 

∙ Legal membership in a nation state.

∙ Nation / Nationalism 

∙ Nation = a term once used to  describe a group of people who  shared a place of origin; now  used interchangeably with nation state. Nationalism = the desire of  an ethnic community to create  and/or maintain a nation­state. ∙ Imagined community 

∙ The invented sense of connection and shared traditions that 

underlies identification with a  particular ethnic group or nation  whose members likely will never  at all meet.

∙ Diaspora 

∙ A group of people living outside 

their ancestral homeland yet 

maintaining emotional and 

material ties to home.

∙ Welcome to Shelbyville –application

of concepts from Chapters 5 & 6?

∙ Individual racism against the 

Somali people.

POST­MIDTERM CHAPTERS: 

Chapter 7: Gender

• Sex vs gender 

• Sex = the observable physical 

differences between males and 

females, especially biological 

differences related to human 

reproduction. Gender = is a 

cultural construct

• Sexual dimorphism 

• Phenotypic differences between 

males and females of the same 

species.

• Intersex 

• The state of being born with a 

combination of male and female 

genitalia, gonads, and/or 

chromosomes.

• Cultural construction of gender 

• As children grow up, they learn 

what kinds of behavior are 

perceived as masculine vs 

feminine = ideas and practices  associated with man/womanhood. • Masculinity 

• Practices of men.

• Femininity 

• Practices of women.

• Gender performance 

• The way gender identity is 

expressed through action.

• Transgender 

• A gender identity or performance  that does not fit with cultural 

norms related to one’s assigned  sex at birth.

• Gender stratification 

• An unequal distribution of power  in which gender shapes who has  access to a group’s resources,  opportunities, rights, and 

privileges.

• Gender stereotypes 

• Widely held preconceived notions about the attributes of, 

differences between, and proper  roles for men and women in a 

culture.

• Gender ideology 

• A set of cultural ideas, usually  stereotypical, about the essential  character of different genders that

Main ideas from Kenya lecture – 

functions to promote and justify  gender stratification.

Chapter 8: Sexuality

Key terms from chapter –

• Sexuality 

• The complex range of desires,  beliefs, and behaviors that are  related to erotic physical contact  and the cultural arena within 

which people debate about what  kinds of physical desires and 

behaviors are right, appropriate,  and natural.

• Heterosexuality 

• Attraction to and sexual relations  between individuals of the 

opposite sex.

• Homosexuality 

• Attraction to and sexual relations  between individuals of the same  sex.

• Bisexuality 

• Attraction to and sexual relations  with members of both sexes.

• Asexuality 

• A lack of erotic attraction to  others.

engage in same sex behavior

• More complicated than blanket

stereotypes about “homosexuality as

a western construct”

• Differences in sexual behavior vs

identity (e.g., do all people who

Chapter 9: Kinship & family

• Kinship 

• The system of meaning and power that cultures create to determine who is related

to whom and to define their mutual

expectations, rights, and responsibilities.

•   Biological, affinal, fictive kin 

Biological = blood relation, affinal = 

cultural rules of marriage and adoption,

identify as “gay”?)

It is import to share research with communities to engage in discussions/guide next steps

fictive kin = other social ties.                                                                                   

• Marriage 

publicly recognized, formal unions that affect 

                                                                  

the status of children and establish rights  and responsibilities.

Monogamy 

a relationship between only two partners.

Polygyny 

marriage between one man and two or more  women.                

Polyandry 

marriage between one woman and two or 

more men.

Companionate vs arranged 

companionate marriage = marriage built on  love, intimacy, and personal choice rather  than social obligation. arranged = marriage  orchestrated by the families of the involved  parties.

Descent group 

a kinship group in which primary 

relationships are traced through certain 

“blood” relatives.

Lineage 

a type of descent group that traces 

genealogical connection through generations by linking persons to a founding ancestor.

C

clan = a type of descent group based on a 

l

claim

a

to a founding ancestor but lacking 

n

genealogical documentation.

Matrilineal vs patrilineal 

matrilineal = constructing the group through  female ancestors. patrilineal = tracing kinship through male ancestors.

•   Family of orientation vs chosen 

family of orientation = the family group in which one is born, grows up, and develops life skills.  chosen families = creating kinship through 

choice.

f

a

m

i

l

y

Chapter 10: Class & inequality

• C

l

Class 

Habitus 

a system of power based on wealth, income 

a

and status that creates an unequal  s

Bourdieu’s term to describe the  self­perceptions, sensibilities, and

sdistribution of society’s resources.

Egalitarian society 

a group based on the sharing of resources to  ensure success with a relative absence of  hierarchy and violence. •

Reciprocity 

the exchange of resources, goods, and 

services among people of relatively equal  status; meant to create and reinforce social  ties. •

Ranked society 

a group in which wealth is not stratified but  prestige and status are. •

Redistribution 

a form of exchange in which accumulated  wealth is collected from the members of the  group and reallocated in a different pattern. •

Bourgeoisie 

Marxist term for the capitalist class that owns

tastes developed in response to  external influences over a lifetime  that shape one’s conceptions of  the world and where one fits in it. Cultural capital 

the knowledge, habits, and tastes  learned from parents and family  that individuals can use to gain  access to scarce and valuable  resources in society.

Intersectionality 

an analytic framework for 

assessing how factors such as  race, gender, and class interact  to shape individual life chances  and societal patterns of 

stratification.

Income 

what people earn from work, plus dividends and interest on 

investments, along with rents  and royalties.

Wealth 

the total value of what someone  owns, minus any debt.

the means of production. •   Poverty – what are explanations for 

Proletariat 

Marxist term for the class of laborers who 

own only their labor. poverty? (e.g., culture of poverty vs 

Prestige 

the reputation, influence, and deference 

bestowed on certain people because of their 

membership in certain groups. structural reasons – structural 

Life chances 

an individual’s opportunities to improve 

quality of life and realize life goals. violence monopoly game); how do •

•Social mobility 

the movement of one’s class position,  upward or downward, in stratified societies.

anthropologists view poverty? poverty as pathology = culture of poverty and blame. poverty as a  structural problem = different  people have different 

opportunities and advantages  (structural violence monopoly).  anthropologists have argued that we need to understand poverty  and class issues in context of  global economy = globalization, 

consumer culture, etc.

Chapter 12: Politics & power

•   State – modern characteristics? 

central admin that penetrates everyday social 

life of citizens, army asserts control over 

boundaries, admin/communication/military 

infrastructures define and reinforce borders,  people within bounds = citizens and allegiance  to the state (rather than other types of 

networks). •

Hegemony 

ability of dominant group to create consent  and agreement within a population without 

Agency 

potential to contest cultural  norms, values, institutions,  structures of power, etc. Social movements­ examples? collective group actions that  seek to build institutional  networks to transform cultural  patterns and government 

the use or threat of force. •

Militarization 

contested social process through which civil  society organizes for the production of 

military violence. • •

Chapter 13: Religion

∙ Science vs. belief systems 

policies.

Framing process 

creation of shared meanings and definitions that motivate and  justify collective action.

∙ science = is a systematic process of inquiry, a way of answering questions about  the world. belief systems = ideas that are taken on faith and cannot be  scientifically proven.

∙ How do anthropologists study and understand religions? 

∙ they are less interested in the big religions and their tenets of faith than the day to­day practice of religion and how it impacts people’s lives.

∙ Major characteristics & functions of religion 

∙ religion itself is a universal trait of culture, religions vary greatly but what they  have in common is the supernatural, many features of the natural world can be  explained by science, but many cannot since they require explanations that are  beyond science, there is also the need to regulate the various levels of human  interaction in order to tell us how to behave, help us deal with the unanswerable  questions.

∙ Atheism, Theism, Animism, Animatism 

∙ atheism = absence of belief in deities or supernatural phenomena. theism = belief  in one or more deities. animism = belief in specific spirits associated with nature  and natural phenomena. animatism = belief in general, impersonal spirit of power.

∙ Supernatural beings – who are they? How do we communicate with them? ∙ they created themselves and then made the world. examples include ancestors or  ghosts that are recognized in monotheistic religions (single supernatural being) or polytheistic (multiple supernatural beings). We can communicate with them  through: self­flagellation, prayer, sacrifice, drug use, and fasting. ∙ Witchcraft, Sorcery, Magic

∙ witchcraft = innate ability, special power, propensity for evil. sorcery = deliberate,  conscious activities to affect themselves and others. magic = spells, incantations,  words and actions to compel supernatural forces to act in certain ways (good or  evil) magic can be imitative or contagious.

∙ How & why are religions adapted locally? Are they less “true” if they deviate from  original teachings? 

∙ religious practices can be flexible and innovative since they are no less complete, meaningful, or true. Globalization shapes cultural and religious change.

∙ Authorizing process (Talal Asad) – complex historical & social developments  through which symbols are given power & meaning 

∙ definitions are not universal; creation of western scholars based on  Eurocentric ideas, may lead scholars to dismiss religions as “backwards,”  need to look at historical development of religion over time.

Chapter 14: health

• Medical anthropology 

• the cross­cultural study of health and healing.

• Health 

• the absence of disease and infirmity, as well as the presence of physical, mental,  and social well­being.

• Disease vs illness 

• disease = diagnosis of an entity/physiological irregularity made by a biomedical  practitioner. Illness = culturally structured, personal experience of being unwell  and can refer to a variety of conditions cross­culturally.

• Health disparities 

• disproportionate or excess morbidity, mortality, or decreased life expectancy and  unequal access to healthcare and other health­related resources in disadvantaged groups.

• Ethnomedicine 

• local systems of health and healing rooted in culturally specific norms and values. traditional use = medical systems within indigenous societies or peasant  communities.

• Biomedicine 

• what are its defining characteristics and is this a form of ethnomedicine? • globally dominant medical system – cultural system just like any other. it  applies the principles of biology and natural sciences to diagnosing  disease and treating patients. encompasses wide range of techniques such as surgery, medication, and technology. it is a form of ethnomedicine since all medical systems are ethnomedicines!

• Biopower 

• forms of control and management over bodies.

• Institutional racism in medicine 

• also points to underlying structural causes in disease distribution – the social  inequalities that produce health inequalities.

• Global health disparities 

• infectious diseases = important disparities. immediate cause is a pathogen which  leads to new diseases such as AIDS, Ebola, hantavirus as well as re­emergent  diseases. spread of infectious disease is the caused by structural inequalities =  breakdown of public health prevention services and health systems, mega­cities,  migration, globalization, and environmental degradation.

Chapter 15: Art

• How do anthropologists define and understand art? 

• anthropologists define art broadly as all the ideas, forms, techniques, and  strategies that humans employ to express themselves creatively and to  communicate their creativity and inspiration to others.

• “Fine art” vs “popular art” 

• fine art = creative expression and communication often associated with cultural  elites. popular art = creative expression and communication often associated with  the general population.

• “Primitive art”

• Why is thinking about representation important in anthropological research? •

Other:

∙ The idea of the “beloved community” 

∙ inclusive, interconnected consciousness. based on love, justice, compassion,  responsibility, shared power. deep respect for all people, places, and things.  radically transforms individuals and restructures institutions.

∙ How was this concept applied to in­class conduct? 

∙ instead of distracting others with our devices and not paying attention to the  lecture, work together as a class community and stay involved with the lecture to  learn together ?

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here