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WSU - PSY 1010 - Chapters 11,12,13 Help with Final - Study Guide

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WSU - PSY 1010 - Chapters 11,12,13 Help with Final - Study Guide

School: Wayne State University
Department: Psychology
Course: Intro Psych
Term: Winter 2019
Tags: Intro to Psychology
Name: Chapters 11,12,13 Help with Final
Description: These notes will be on the final exam
Uploaded: 04/27/2019
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Join more than 18,000+ college students at Wayne State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Wayne State University
Department: Psychology
Course: Intro Psych
Term: Winter 2019
Tags: Intro to Psychology
Name: Chapters 11,12,13 Help with Final
Description: These notes will be on the final exam
Uploaded: 04/27/2019
5 Pages 33 Views 26 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!

Unformatted text preview: No Service 11:53 PM 80% attribution a decision regarding what caused an outcome or a person's behavior, motivated by need for predictability and control over environment internal (personal attribution attributing cause to something about the person or the self external (situational) attribution attributing cause to something external to the person or the self (such as the situation) The Fundamental Attribution Error (FAE) a tendency to focus on internal (personal) causes and underestimate the impact of situations on people's behavior - ex. Guy from presidential speech - Screaming Why? Perceptual Bias - Actor is "figure", situation is "ground" cognitive dissonance unpleasant psychological state aroused by thinking about or engaging in behaviors that are discrepant from one's attitudes, beliefs, and self-image - Ex. The questions he asked us if we agree or not- obviously we agree, but we often behave differently and oppositely. We try and make excuses as to why during OUR circumstance that it is reasonable, but with others, we will often correct them. - Festinger and Carlsmith's (1959) "peg-turning" study - Conditions: Paid $1 to lie, Paid $20 to lie, did not lie insufficient justificationNo Service 11:53 PM @ 80% insufficient justification FREELY performing a self-concept discrepant behavior without having any EXTERNAL justification for doing ? - Aronson and Mills (1959) "initiation" study - No initiation, mild initiation, severe initiation - Those in severe initiation condition reported most interest in boring group discussion effort justification the tendency for individuals to increase their liking for something they have worked hard to attain Milgram's (1963) Obedience Experiment and explanations for experiments Context: Post-WWII, Nuremberg Trials Participants arrive at Yale 2 people, "randomly" assigned to learner and teacher role (Ps always teacher) Learner (supposedly) receives increasingly harsher shocks most obeyed the experimenter Explanations 1. Responsibility assumed by individual perceived to be legitimate authority figure 2. Entrapment and escalation (foot-in-the-door) 3. Cognitive dissonance and self-justification conditions that increase or decrease obediance 1. Context and surroundings 2. Perceived legitimacy/credibility of authority figure 3. The "immediacy" of the social influence agent (e.g., less obedience if experimenter is in remote location) 4. Proximity of victim - more responsibility felt if victim is close80% No Service 11:54 PM 5. Having an ally makes it easier to resist intelligence the differences people show in their ability to perform tasks Spearman sought to find g factor and s factor general factor "g": general intelligence that contributes to performance on a wide variety of tasks Specific factor "s": specific intelligence that contributes to performance on specific tasks Triarchic Theory of Intelligence: Sternberg (1985) proposes three types of intelligence analytical, creative, practical analytical intelligence Performing well on conventional tests that tap reasoning and logical-mathematical ability (SAT) creative intelligence Expresses how well people are able to cope with new/ novel tasks practical intelligence Taps how well people fit into their environments Measuring intelligence (Binet and Simon), Mental Age: the chronological age that best fits the child's current level of intellectual performance, calculated by comparing a child's test score with the average scores for different age groups IQ = (mental age / chron. age) X 100

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