×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to SDSU - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to SDSU - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

SDSU / Engineering / BIOL 211 / Who is the Belgian chemist and alchemist that weighed a growing plant

Who is the Belgian chemist and alchemist that weighed a growing plant

Who is the Belgian chemist and alchemist that weighed a growing plant

Description

School: San Diego State University
Department: Engineering
Course: General Microbiology
Professor: Ronald wolkowicz
Term: Fall 2019
Tags: Microbiology
Cost: 50
Name: Exam 1 Study Guide
Description: An outline of lecture notes and important concepts for the exam List of topics at the end highlighting subjects our exam may be on!
Uploaded: 09/22/2019
11 Pages 6 Views 10 Unlocks
Reviews


Bio 211 Exam 1 Study Guide


Who is the Belgian chemist and alchemist that weighed a growing plant to determine where the growth was coming from?



Origin of Life: Sand on Mars

● Spontaneous Generation: Belief that life can start from nothing

    Before: “Life arises spontaneously from non­living material” 

1. Johann Baptista Van Helmont: Belgian Chemist & Alchemist, weighed a growing plant to determine where the new growth was coming from

    After:  

1. Francesco Redi: Italian physicist; spontaneous maggot appearance proven wrong by  covering meat and observing the effects

2. Louis Pasteur: French chemist; sterilized broth being exposed to microbes after tilting  the flask, which led to further contamination

3. ***Anton van Leeuwenhoek: Dutch linen draper; created simple microscope with lens  and focus knob = saw bug in a drop of water and observed the magnification

First Microscopes:


Who created simple microscope with lens and focus knob?



● Robert Hooke: British geometrist; compound microscope

○ He studied ‘microscopial mushrooms’ in bread

“True” Microbiology ­ The Golden “Age” 

● Robert Koch: German physician

● Louis Pasteur: French chemist

Microbiology: Study of microorganisms & microbes, agents too small to be seen with the  naked eye

Studies:  

Bacteria → Bacteriology

Viruses → Virology

Fungi → Mycology

Protozoa → Protozoology

Algae → Phycology

They Are Everywhere (Luckily!) 

● Up to 1x10^6 bacteria per mL of water

● 1x10^7 phages per mL 

● More bacteria ‘in and on’ our bodies than the # of human cells

● 50% of oxygen comes from photosynthetic bacteria

● Grow in extreme conditions

● Shape the planet

Three Domains 

1. Eukarya = macrobes


What phase of bacterial growth the cells no longer growing?



2. Bacteria = microbes

3. Archaea = microbes

8/28

Resolution: The minimum distance that enables one to distinguish two objects as separate  distinct entities

Shape: 

● Spherical

○ Coccus (Streptococcus Pneumoniae)

● Cylindrical

○ Bacillus (Rod)

○ Coccobacillus (Spherical Rod) We also discuss several other topics like octal encoding

● Spiral

○ Vibrios (Commas)

○ Spirillae (Rigid Waves)

○ Spirochetes (Flexible Corkscrew)

Arrangement of Prokaryotes 

Plane of Divisions

1. One axis

a. Diplococci = pair of cocci (two halves)

b. Streptococci = chains of one division after another 

2. Two axes

a. Tetrad = occurs in two planes and grouping of four cells arranged in a square 3. Three axes

a. Sarcinae = Division occurs in three planes and a group of eight

4. Staphylococci = division occurs in multiple planes and forms a grape shape

Prokaryotic Cell Structure: 

­ Nucleoid: Not separated from rest of cell, important for transcription ­ Fibrous appearance (Nucleoid) and Granular (Cytoplasm)

­ All organisms have double­stranded DNA We also discuss several other topics like gsu ic

­ Central Dogma of Biology: DNA → RNA → Protein

Prokaryotic vs. Eukaryotic 

1. Nucleoid vs. Nucleus

a. Exception: Plantomycetes; but no eukaryotic type mitotic apparatus

2. Cytoplasm organization and complexity

Function

Structure

Prokaryote

Eukaryote

Osmotic Barrier

Cytoplasmic Membrane

Cytoplasmic Barrier

Transport of Solutes

Cytoplasmic Membrane

Cytoplasmic Membrane

Respiratory E­ Transport

Cytoplasmic Membrane

Mitochondrial Membrane

Protein Synthesis

Polyribosomes (Cytoplasm)

Polyribosomes on ER

Lipid Synthesis

Cytoplasmic Membrane

Smooth ER, Golgi Apparatus

Wall Polymers Synthesis

Cytoplasmic Membrane

Golgi Apparatus in plants

Protein Secretion

Cytoplasmic Membrane

ER and Secretory Vesicles

Photosynthesis

Different membranes

Chloroplast Membrane

Size of the Genome: 

9.6x10^3 HIV­1 Virus

6.7x10^11 Amoeba Dubia

3.2x10^9 Homo Sapiens

2.9­4000 millions in Eukaryotes

Prokaryotic Genome: 

Single Chromosome

One copy of the chromosome

Circular 

Plasmids

9/9 Cell Structure II

Murein Net: Mesh of peptidoglycans that surround the bacteria wall

­ Gram Negative: L­LysineDon't forget about the age old question of cse 331 msu

­ Gram Positive: Meso­diaminopimelic acid

Murein Sacculus 

● Sack of sugars and proteins

● Murein is sensitive to lysozyme

○ Cleave sugar (peptide) bonds

● Attack site of carbohydrate chain Don't forget about the age old question of is skin reflectance randomly distributed throughout the globe

Structure of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 

● Lipids + Polysaccharides

● Disaccharide Diphosphate: In between lipid and polysaccharide connection ● LPS is the cause of disease and some contain O antigens that are toxic to humans

Specialized Structures on the Outside: 

Capsule

Appendages

Flagella

Pilli

Structure

Function

Basic Composition

Flagella

Swimming movement

Protein

Pilli

Sex Pilus

Mediates DNA transfer during conjugation

Protein

Common Pilli

Attachment to surfaces;  protection against 

phagotrophic engulfment

Protein

Capsules

Surface attachment; 

Protection against phagocytic engulfment; occasionally  killing or digesting; nutrients  reserve/protection against  dessication

Usually polysaccharide;  rarely polypeptide Don't forget about the age old question of what is karyogamy

● Common Pili/Fimbriae: Attachment to surfaces; protection against phagotrophic  protection

● Capsules: Surface attachment; protection against phagocytic engulfment; occasionally  killing/digestion; nutrient reserve or protection against desiccation (usually  polysaccharide and rarely polypeptide)

The Capsule as Part of the Envelope 

Cell Envelope: Cell wall and plasma membrane

Flagella 

● Monotrichous: One tail

● Lophotrichous: Multiple tails coming out of one end

● Amphitrichous: Tails at both ends

● Peritrichous: Tails coming out of the entire surface

**Composed of: Rings, basal body, plasma membrane, filament (flagellin), peptidoglycan  (murein layer), outer membrane, hook If you want to learn more check out holly harris sfsu

­ Motor of flagella of Gram Negative bacteria has four rings

­ Motor of Gram Positive flagella has two rings

Flagellum Assembly 

● M and S inserted into membrane

● Rod added and capped, motor proteins added, rod inserted, P and L added ● Hook added and finished

● Flagellin added, filament formed and capped

Movement 

● A cell moves via a series of runs and tumbles

● Cell moves randomly when there is no concentration gradient of attractant or repellant ● When a cell senses that it is moving toward an attractant, it tumbles (T) less frequently,  so the runs in the direction of the attractant are longer

Speed 

Cheetah 111 km/hour

Human 37.5 km/hour

Bacteria 0.00015 km/hour

Appendages: Pili (Fimbriae) and Flagella 

● Bacteria transfers genetic material = sex

● Sex is variable because once giving/receiving DNA, the “sex” of each bacterium  changes

Feature

Gram Negative

Gram Positive

Peptidoglycan Cell Wall

Very thick

Very thin

LPS Outer Membrane

None

Present outside pep layer

Porins

None

Present in outer membrane

Periplasmic Space

None

Between pep & second cell membrane

S­Layer Attached to 

Peptidoglycans

Outer Layer

Teichoicacids

Present

None

Flagella Have (If Present)

2 supporting rings

4 supporting rings

Pili Present

In a very few gram positive

In almost all gram negative

Crystal Violet Dye

Retained!!!

Not retained!!!

9/11 Dynamics of Bacterial Growth

Major Elements & Functions

C ­ Main constituent of cellular material

O ­ Constituent of cell’s material and water

N ­ Constituent of amino/nucleic acids, nucleotides

H ­ Main constituent of organic compounds & cell water

P ­ Constituent of nucleic acids, nucleotides, phospholipids, LPS, techoic acids S ­ Constituent cysteine, methionine, glutathione

K ­ Main cellular inorganic cation and cofactor

Mg ­ Inorganic cellular cation, cofactor for enzymes, endospores component Fe ­ Component of cytochromes, and certain non­heme iron­proteins, cofactor for some                 

        Enzymatic reactions

Element 

% DW

Source

C

50

Organic compounds or CO2

O

20

H2O, organic compounds, CO2 and O2

N

14

NH3, NO2, organic compounds, N2

H

8

H2O, organic compounds, H2

P

3

Inorganic phosphates (PO4)

S

1

SO4, H2S, S, organic sulfur compounds

K

1

Potassium salts

Mg

0.5

Magnesium salts

Ca 

0.5

Calcium salts

Fe 

0.2

Iron salts

Bacterial Growth Curve 

1. Lag Phase: Cells synthesizing/preparing materials, nothing is divide

2. Log Phase: Exponential Growth: 1 → 2 → 4 → 8 → 16…

a. 10 doublings increases density by ~1000

b. log10(n) increases linearly

3. Stationary Phase: Cells no longer growing 

Measuring Growth 

n = number of generations

N = number of cells

No = number of cells at time 0

g = generation time (g = t/n)

k = special growth rate constant

Dynamics of Microbial Growth 

Exponential Growth

● Leaving the lag phase to enter exponential growth

● Length of the lag phase depends on:

○ Organism

○ Growth Media

○ Conditions

○ Time been on stationary phase

● Balanced Growth: Refers to average behavior of cells in the population

Continuous Culture: The Chemostat

● Ensures balanced growth

● Ensures logarithmic growth

Growing Fast, Not Always

● E.Coli → 20 minutes @ 37 celsius

● Vibrio Natrigiens → < 10 minutes 

● Rich Media: Nutrient broth

● Minimal Media: Glucose & inorganic salts/defined medium

● Differential Media: All grow

● Selective Media: Some grow

Measuring Growth

● Turbidity

● Viable count: Colonies (clumps)

● Counter chamber

● Electronic Counting (electrical conductivity)

● Balanced Growth: All components of the cell grow as cell number grows ● Maximal Rate: Optimal amount of protein­synthesis machinery 

Affecting Growth

● Temperature

● Hydrostatic Pressure

● Osmotic Pressure

● Oxygen

● pH

● When growth rate increases: RNA increases, Protein increases, DNA slowly increases ● Stop growing: Nutrients decreases, waste products increase

Love Cold, Love Heat

● Growth rate increases with temperature

● Proteins denature at high temperatures

● Facultative: Eurythermophile (Broad Range)

● Obligate: Stenotermophile (Narrow Range)

**Strain 121 likes 121 degrees Celsius

9/16­9/18 When One Cell Becomes Two

Cell Division 

1. Cell gets longer and replicates

2. DNA is moved into each future daughter cell + cross wall forms

3. Cell divides into two new cells

4. Cells separate 

Escherichia Coli

4.7x10^6 pp → 1.1 mm → 500-1000 bacterial length

‘Counting Bacteria’ 

● Bacterial Baby Machine

● FACS: Fluorescence Activating Cell Sorter

Bacterial Cell Cycle 

In Eukaryotes: Mitosis & Cytokinesis

In Prokaryotes: Multifork Replication

Replication: DnaB ­ Primase DnaG ­ short RNA Primer 

Initiation: At OriC, initiator DnaA, replicase DnaB­DnaC

Elongation: Leading Strand: DNA Polymerase III

         Lagging Strand: Okasaki Fragments

Termination: At terC

Semiconservative Replication: Melt double­stranded DNA, polymerize complementary strands

DNA Replication 

1. Replication of chromosomal DNA starts at the origin of replication and then proceeds in  both directions

2. Bidirectional replication creates two advancing forks where DNA synthesis is occurring 3. The replication forks ultimately meet at terminating site

4. DNA replication is semiconservative (each of 2 molecules created contains one original  strand paired with a newly synthesized strand)

***ENZYMES OF DNA REPLICATION*** 

1. Topoisomerase: Initiates DNA unwinding

2. Helicase: Unwinds original ds, once supercoiling has been eliminated by  topoisomerase ­ requires ATP to produce strands

3. DNA Polymerase III: Proceeds along ssDNA, recruiting free dNTP’s to form a  covalent phosphodiester bond w previous nucleotide of same strand. Part of  holoenzyme and needs a primer with a 3’OH group where it can attach d’NTP  4. Primase: Attaches the RNA primer to the ssDNA

5. RNase H: Removes RNA primer

6. DNA Polymerase I: Fills in the gap

7. Ligase: Catalyzes formation of a phosphodiester bond between unattached 3’OH  and adjacent 5’P, filling in unattached gap left when RNA primer is removed. DNA  Polymerase can organize bod at 5’ end, ligase is needed for 3’ end

8. Single­stranded binding proteins: SSBS maintain the stability of the replication  fork. SSDNA is otherwise labile and prompt to degradation

Unwinding DNA is the First Step 

● Movement of DNA replication induces positive supercoils

● Type I cleave one strand

● Type II cleave both strands

Initiation of Replication 

● DNA helicase meets DNA

● DNA helicase recruits primase, which starts replication through RNA ● Primer recruits clamp loader to each strand

● Clamp binds DNA polymerase III to strand

● Polymerase proceeds 5’ → 3’ on each strand

RNA Primer removal during elongation = discontinuous DNA synthesis results in DNA RNA stretches 

Cell Division 

Binary fission

Unequal fission } (all 3) Separation into different planes of division: staph, strepto, diplo,  Budding sarcinae, tetrad

● Many gram ­ bacteria: constriction of cell envelope

● Many gram + bacteria: invagination of cell envelope = septum

Normal Division: Finding the Middle 

FtsZ polymerization = ring formation

Important Topics to Know For Sure: 

● Who Anton van Leeuwenhoek and what he did

● Robert Hooke’s contribution to microscopes

● The three domains and the organisms in each one

● Differences between Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes

● Functions of the structures in the cells

● Dr.Gram and his contributions

● Gram staining process

● Types of stains and what they’re responsible for

● Differences between gram positive and gram negative

● Features of gram negative/positive membranes

● Structure of lipopolysaccharides

● Flagellum assembly

● Major elements, their functions, % dw, and source

● Know which elements are the most abundant in a cell

● Know how to identify the bacterial growth curve

● Know what n, g, k, and N stand for

● Types of media: Selective, differential, rich, and minimal

● Facultative vs. Obligate

● Cell division process

● The steps and stages of DNA replication

● What is semiconservative replication

● Enzymes of DNA replication

○ Topoisomerase, Helicase, DNA Polymerase III, Primase, RnaseH, DNA  Polymerase I, Ligase, Single­Stranded Binding Proteins

● How Replication is initiated

● FtsZ Polymerization and Ring Formation

○ What MinC, MinD, MinE are responsible for

○ Where is MinE found?

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here