×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Texas State - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Texas State - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

TEXAS STATE / Engineering / PHIL / Etymology is the study of what?

Etymology is the study of what?

Etymology is the study of what?

Description

PHILOSOPHY MIDTERM EXAM 


Etymology is the study of what?



INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY 

I. Etymology 

­ The word philosophy means “love of wisdom”

­ The earliest philosophers were wise teachers

II. “Queen of Sciences”

­ 1st subject and discipline 

­ Natural v social sciences 

­ What is the simplest form of all things?

­ Fire, water, earth, numbers, atoms?

III. Hard Questions 

­ Does God exist?

­ Is this real? If you want to learn more check out unlv hist 100

Philosophy factors 

­ metaphysics

­ the study of beyond ultimate reality 

­ meta (above and beyond) 

­ what is real?

­ epistemology 

­ the study of knowledge 


What is the contribution of rené descartes in the society?



If you want to learn more check out a school newspaper reporter decides to randomly survey

­ what can I know?

­ axiology 

­ the study of ethics (judgment of moral principle)

­ aesthetics 

­ art

­ beauty 

­ logic 

­ the study of argumentation and reasoning 

LOGIC  

The study of reasoning

The study of argumentation 

­ an attempt to persuade by rational meanings 

1. premises (at least two)

2. conclusions 

­ premises – lend support to the conclusions 

­ conclusion – the statement of the point being argued for 

­ treat premises like assumptions 

Valid: in a valid argument the conclusion follows necessarily from the premises. In a valid argument that if the premises are true then the conclusion must be true  Well­reasoned 


What is platonic dualism?



Good form 

Soundness: An argument is valid and has true premises. Strive for a true  conclusion 

­ Invalid argument 

INFORMAL FALLACIES 

BEGGING THE QUESTION

The fallacy of begging the question/ circular reasoning/ arguing in a circle/  question begging  If you want to learn more check out psych 110

­ to assume the truth of what is in dispute

Pedro: God exists

Erica: How do you know?

Pedro: it says it in the bible  If you want to learn more check out What is a neutral axis?

Erica: How do you know the bible is authentic?

Pedro: because it’s the word of God 

APPEAL TO IGNORANCE

The fallacy of appeal to ignorance means arguing from ignorance ­ to make a knowledge claim 

­ based on no information

­ shifts burden of proof

­ there is no evidence to the contrary, therefore it must be true 

I guess I didn’t get the job. They never called me 

She hasn’t said she doesn’t like you right? So, she’s interested 

SLIPPERY SLOPE 

The fallacy of slippery slope/ domino fallacy means assuming that one event  necessarily leads to a chain of events  If you want to learn more check out psyc1001 - psychology 1001 notes

­ things that have yet to happen

QUESTIONABLE CAUSE 

A cause of fallacy that had already happened 

­ post hoc, ergo propter hoc 

­ after this, therefore because of this 

We never had a problem with the elevator until you moved in 

­ Confusion of cause and effect 

­ causal implication 

CONFUSION OF A NECESSARY WITH A SUFFICIENT CONDITION  (FORMAL)

Affirming the consequence form or denying the antecedent 

­ I don’t know why the car won’t run, I just filled the gas 

­ there are many reasons of why the car didn’t start or why  If you want to learn more check out rel 108 uiuc

something didn’t happen

UNWARRANTED GENERALIZATION 

The fallacy of unwarranted generalization is a weak inductive argument  ­ too small sample sizes 

­ unrepresentative data 

Based on one bad experience 

FALSE DILEMMA/FALSE ALTERNATIVES 

Dilemma means two alternatives but neither one is desirable 

­ maybe there isn’t always two choices 

­ assuming there are fewer possibilities 

FAULTY ANALOGY 

This fallacy consists in assuming that because two things are alike in one or more  respects, they are necessarily alike in some ways 

­ comparing two things that are not the same 

AD HOMINEM 

Is Latin for abusing the man or abusing the person 

Attacking the person to undermine their position or their argument  ­ because you attack someone the that means you think they are not  credible 

STRAW MAN (COMMON MORE DANGEROUS)

This fallacy occurs when, in attempting to refute another person’s argument, you  address only a weak or distorted version of it. 

It is a distortion or mischaracterization of a position or an argument to  make it seem weaker 

­ “so, what you’re saying is, misconception” 

RED HERRING 

This fallacy consists in diverting attention from the real issue by focusing instead  on an issue having only a surface relevance to the first 

­ diverting attention from the main issue to a side issue, which is not  necessarily relevant 

EQUIVOCATION

The fallacy of equivocation occurs when a key term or phrase in an argument is  used in an ambiguous way. To infer a mistaken meaning

INCONSTISTENCY 

A person commits the fallacy of inconsistently when he or she makes  contradictory claims

Not that either claim is necessarily false. They can’t both be true at the  same time 

­ I am not sexist but then says something sexist 

IRRELEVANT AUTHORITY 

The appeal to common opinion 

­ just because a lot of people believe it, doesn’t mean it’s true

­ someone is successful/famous therefore what they are saying  must be true 

Appeal to celebrity 

Appeal to intelligence 

TWO WRONGS 

“if others are doing it I can too”

“you do it too” 

Hypocrite for saying this therefore your criticism is wrong 

­ “big deal a lot of people cheat too”

IS OUGHT 

Aka the naturalistic fallacy. It is this way, so it should be this way. It isn’t this  way, so it shouldn’t be this way 

An appeal to nature

Its natural = good

Its unnatural = bad 

An appeal to the status quo 

An appeal to tradition

An appeal to legality

OUGHT IS 

Wishful thinking fallacy 

­ it should be this way, therefore it is this way 

­ it shouldn’t be this way, therefore it isn’t this way 

Desire for what is true 

DESCARTES

 (1596­1650)

The modern period of philosophy 

The father of modern philosophy 

What can we know to be true?

Trying to figure out what he can be certain of 

Concerned about the limited sense of knowledge 

PLATO 

­ student of Societies 

­ world becoming v world being 

­ influenced by many 

Platonic dualism / Plato’s Theory of Forms 

­ the essence precedes existence 

­ trying to explain essence 

­ what makes something 

­ what is it?

HUME

Hume “Bundle Theory of Self”

­ self is nothing more than sense impressions strung together by memory  ­ there is no empirical basis for belief in self 

KANT

KANT’S REVISION 

­ the a priori and synthetic knowledge 

­ An informative statement about reality the truth of which that is 

independent known as sense experience 

KANT’S FACULTIES OF THE MIND 

1). Faculty of intuition (aka faculty of perception)

­ space: “parallel lines never intersect”

­ time: “7 + 5 = 12”

2). Faculty of understanding 

­ 12 pure categories 

­ unity/plurality/totality 

­ every event has a cause 

3). Faculty of reason 

­ causation 

MEMENTO

MAIN:

Leonard:

­ man hunting down John G because he raped and murders his wife. He  killed Teddy. He has short term memory loss. Has crazy tattoos of things  he will forget. He captured Dodd. Said to get rid of him for Natalie  Teddy:

­ knows Leonard has short term memory loss

Natalie:

­ gives Leonard information about John G. she also lost someone. She will help Leonard out of pity and gain. She lost Jimmy. Jimmy was killed by  Teddy

SUPPORTING:

Burt:

Dodd:

­ beat up Natalie. Captured by Leonard 

Sammy Jenkins:

­ short term memory loss. It was very bad. Learned from conditioning and  repetition. Avoid not by memory but by instinct 

Mrs. Jenkins: 

Jimmy: 

­ killed by Teddy

SELF

THEORY OF SELF

­ transcendental unity of apperception 

­ self is the activity of stringing together one’s conscious experience  ­ self is a process rather than a thing 

­ much of psychology is based of self 

KANT CONTINUED 

­ in truth chapter 

HUME CONTINUED 

­ in knowledge chapter 

LOCKE 

DESCARTES CONTINUED

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here