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ECU - FORL 2000 - Study Guide

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ECU - FORL 2000 - Study Guide

School: East Carolina University
Department: Foreign Language
Course: Interpreting Literature
Professor: Su-Ching Huang
Term: Winter 2016
Tags: Interpreting Literature
Name: Terminology Midterm
Description: this study guide contains definitions and examples of the terminology that will be on our next exam
Uploaded: 02/29/2016
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background image ENGLISH 2000 Interpreting Literature Midterm: Terminology 1. Character: A person in a story.
2. Climax: the turning point of a story characterized by a crisis.
3. Conflict: a struggle between two characters or a character and opposing forces.
4. Physical conflict: a physical struggle between characters (e.g. argument or fist fight).
5. Internal conflict: a struggle within a character; also called a psychological conflict (e.g.  identity crisis or mixed emotions on a certain subject, indecisiveness or determining what is right and wrong. 6. Social conflict: conflict between a character and society or differences between personal  and/or societal values (e.g. a child defying his or her parents, challenging the norms of  society). 7. Denouement: French term meaning “unknotting”; the unraveling of events, usually at the  end of a story.  8. Diction: formal/informal; concrete/abstract 9. Epiphany:  a type of climax characterized by a revelation; a moment of enlightenment or  realization (e.g. the underlying or deeper meaning of a phrase). 10. Exposition: an explanation of actions that occurred before the initial actions in a story. 11. Flashback: an event or series of events provided in the story that happened in the past.
12. Gaps: events or parts of a story that are left out. 
13.       Image: word or phrases that appeal to one or more senses or a sensory experience.
14. In medias res: Latin phrase meaning “into the middle of things”. Stories that start in the 
middle rather than the beginning (usually using flashbacks as a way to filling in  background events). 15. Initiation story: a work of fiction where protagonist undergoes life­altering experiences.
16.
      Irony: a feeling, attitude, tone or mood in which what is expected to happen is usually  opposite from reality. 17. Verbal Irony: using words/phrases to express something other than literal meaning.
18. Situational Irony: inconsistency between what is expected to happen and what actually 
happens; when the expected outcome of a situation is not what actually happens in a  story.  19.       Dramatic Irony: when the reader/audience knows more than the characters.
background image ENGLIS 2000 Interpreting Literature 20. Literal: the actual meaning of a word or phrase.
21. Figurative Language: use of language that has a specific effect or special meaning
22.       Motif:  a recurring element that is developed throughout a story.
23. Narrator: the person telling the story
24. 1   st    person POV: story told by the narrator in a personal way. The story told by the narrator relates to events in the author’s life; usually uses “I”, “me” and “we” (e.g. narrators from  The House on Mango Street and Daughter of Invention). 25. 2   nd    Person POV:  the way a story is told by the narrator using the word “you” as if  speaking directly to audience/reader. 26. 3   rd    Person POV: story told by an unnamed, unidentified observer from the outside, who  does not use “I”, “We” or “You” (e.g. narrator from Love in L.A.). 27. Unreliable Narrator: narrators that are either too young or too young that have limited  knowledge do to experiences; they are usually biased (e.g. The House on Mango Street). 28. Naïve Narrator: young or inexperienced narrator who doesn’t fully understand the  implications of what he or she is talking about (e.g. the narrator from The House on  Mango Street). 29. Plot: the actions or series of events that take place in a story. 30. POV: refers to the narration of a story; the type of narrator and how the narrator tells a  story. 31. Recitative: vocal style that imitates speech or the way words are spoken. 32. Repetition: repeated events, words and phrases in a story; usually holds significant  meaning in the story. 33. Setting: where the story takes place; can be represented by time (actual time or era) or  place (destination).18 th  Century America is an example of a setting. 34. Style: the way diction is used in a story; can be formal or informal.
35.
      Symbol: element(s) in a story that represent more than just its literal meaning (e.g. the  use of red in The Red Convertible). 36. Theme: main idea of a story; stated in a sentence (e.g.  In Daughter of Invention, the  theme is the discovery and acceptance of one’s self). 37. Tone: attitude or voice toward character/events in a story; dialect/ diction conveyed;  conveys various meanings.

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School: East Carolina University
Department: Foreign Language
Course: Interpreting Literature
Professor: Su-Ching Huang
Term: Winter 2016
Tags: Interpreting Literature
Name: Terminology Midterm
Description: this study guide contains definitions and examples of the terminology that will be on our next exam
Uploaded: 02/29/2016
3 Pages 9 Views 7 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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