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Towson - FORL 221 - Class Notes - Week 6

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Towson - FORL 221 - Class Notes - Week 6

School: Towson University
Department: Foreign Language
Course: British Literature to 1798
Professor: K. Attie
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: SpenserThe Faerie Queene, Petrarch (Francesco Petrarcha), Sir Thomas Wyatt's "I Find No Peace, " Sir Phillip Sidney's Astrophel and Stella and Sonnet 47, and William Shakespeare's sonnets 3, 18, 20, and and 130.
Name: Week 5 Notes
Description: Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Petrarch (Francesco Petrarcha), Sir Thomas Wyatt's "I Find No Peace," Sir Phillip Sidney's Astrophel and Stella and Sonnet 47, and William Shakespeare's sonnets 3, 18, 20, and 130.
Uploaded: 03/04/2016
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background image 16     th    and 17     th    Century Poetry Vocab Scansion­ scanning the poem for the pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables Example: ( /  for stressed and  U  for  un stressed syllables) Thence   pas sing   fourth they   shor tly   do   arr ive . ­ Iambic Pentameter (10 beats or 5 sets) ­ Iambic Tetrameter (8 beats or 4 sets)
­
Trochee Tetrameter (8 beats or 4 sets) – starts with / not U Edmund Spenser The Second Booke of the Faerie Queene 1.        Theme: Relationship Between Art and Nature Background
­ Inherited from the ancients through the debate by philosophers about which is 
more aesthetically pleasing  ­ General belief: “That natures worke by art can imitate” (Canto 12, stanza 42).  Art can only imitate and not rival nature’s work. Aesthetically pleasing art is morally hazardous 
­ Art can contain lifelike deception (12, 61).
Competition accidentally creates collaboration beauty is beauty
­ It creates the beautiful garden (12, 59)
ALSO related to music versus nature
­ “instruments, windes, water, all agree” (12, 70)
  2.        Temperance  Basically, control your passions! The story:
­ Enclosed garden is easy to enter, but hard to exit, like sin in general (12, 43). 
­ Thin walled indicates a focus on beauty rather than utility.  a. Allegorically: thinly controlled passions ­          Excesse character  a. Extends hand to Guyon to offer gold, but he rejects it ­          Acrasia (meaning intemperance)  a. Cleopatra reference (“orient”) entices, but does not satisfy  b. Allegorically: traps “verdant”/ green or new man: portrays the gentlemanly  reader of this text c. Mythologically: Venus and her lover Mars are captured in a net
background image 3.        The Genius of the Bower Suspicious Figure
­ “more than naturall” (12, 46) 
Destructive, but physically appealing
­ Opposes generation of life
­ Tempting figure Indulgent priest at mass
­ Staff for formality, drinking cup (12, 46­49)
­  Sir Guyon tries to show him temperance: “But he hid his idle curtesie defied, / 
And overthrew his bowl disdain fury” (12, 49). 4.        Setting Eternal spring of paradise 
­ “Nor scorching heat, nor cold temperate” (12, 51)
Alluring like Eden, BUT deceptive
­ “With boughs and braunches which did broad dilate” (12, 53)
­ “wanton wreathings” – succumbing to sexual desires 
­ Effortless, painted art­ like Eden (12,88)
a. Similar to the Renaissance aesthetic virtue: sprezzatura­ an effortless grace/  arts that hides itself  5.        Catholicism vs. Protestantism Ransacking of the garden mirrors the destruction of Catholic churches by Protestants 
­ BUT Wrathful: more fitting of allegory than Guyon in the garden (12, 83)
Renaissance Love and Desire

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School: Towson University
Department: Foreign Language
Course: British Literature to 1798
Professor: K. Attie
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: SpenserThe Faerie Queene, Petrarch (Francesco Petrarcha), Sir Thomas Wyatt's "I Find No Peace, " Sir Phillip Sidney's Astrophel and Stella and Sonnet 47, and William Shakespeare's sonnets 3, 18, 20, and and 130.
Name: Week 5 Notes
Description: Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Petrarch (Francesco Petrarcha), Sir Thomas Wyatt's "I Find No Peace," Sir Phillip Sidney's Astrophel and Stella and Sonnet 47, and William Shakespeare's sonnets 3, 18, 20, and 130.
Uploaded: 03/04/2016
5 Pages 13 Views 10 Unlocks
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  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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