Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

CSU - BC 103 - Life103, Exam 2 Study Guide - Study Guide

Created by: Addy Carroll Elite Notetaker

> > > > CSU - BC 103 - Life103, Exam 2 Study Guide - Study Guide

CSU - BC 103 - Life103, Exam 2 Study Guide - Study Guide

School: Colorado State University
Department: Biology
Course: Biology of Organisms-Animals and Plants
Professor: Jennifer Dewey
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Biology
Name: Life103, Exam 2 Study Guide
Description: This is a type of study aid for exam 2. If you need help understanding anything on the document, please let me know!
Uploaded: 03/04/2016
0 5 3 60 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 14 of a 27 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Life 103 Exam 2 Study Guide  Gymnosperms  •  Gymnosperm  -Means “naked seed”  •  Seeds  -A seed consists of an embryo and nutrients surrounded by a protective 
coat
 
-Seeds changed the course of plant evolution, enabling their bearers to 
become the dominant producers in most terrestrial ecosystems 
 
~In other words, land plants no longer had to live close to the water        in order to reproduce  -Foundational for modern ecosystems 
-One important key to civilization 
•  Seed Plants  -In addition to having seeds, the following are common to all seed plants 
 
~Reduced gametophytes     ~Heterospory (see heterospory section below)    ~Ovules (female gametophyte)    ~Pollen (male gametophyte)  -The gametophytes of seed plants develop within the walls of spores that 
are retained within tissues of the parent sporophyte  
•  Heterospory  -The ancestors of seed plants were likely homosporous (homo=same), 
while seed plants are heterosporous (hetero=different) 
-Megasporangia produce megaspores that give rise to female 
gametophytes 
-Microsporangia produce microspores that give rise to male gametophytes  
•  Ovules and Production of Eggs  -An ovule consists of a megasporangium, megaspore, and one or more 
protective integuments (outside coating that is made up of sporophyte 
tissue) 
-Gymnosperm megaspores have one integument 
-Angiosperm megaspores usually have two integuments 
•  Gymnosperm Female Anatomy  -Megasporangium: diploid tissue where haploid microspores are formed 
(meiosis) 
-Megaspore: haploid cell that grows into the female gametophyte, 
including the egg nucleus 
•  Gymnosperm Male Anatomy  -Microsporangium: diploid tissue where haploid microspores are formed 
(meiosis) 
-Microspores: develop into male gametophyte 
-Pollen: contains the male gametophyte within the tough pollen wall 
 
~Pollen grains have few cells, so they need protection from the         environment by the pollen wall  •  Gymnosperm Fertilization (see textbook figure 30.3a) 
background image -The pollen is released into the air and it spreads for miles 
-The pollen grain reaches ovule and germinates  
-The pollen tube grows from the pollen grains and begins digesting               
through the Megasporangium 
-After digging its way through the megasporangium, the pollen tube 
reaches the egg nucleus, discharges sperm nucleus into the egg nucleus 
of female gametophyte  
•  Pollen and Production of Sperm (see textbook figure 30.3b)  -Microspores develop into pollen grains, which contain the male 
gametophytes 
-Pollination is the transfer of pollen to the part of a seed plant containing 
the ovules 
-Pollen eliminates the need for a film of water and can be dispersed great 
distances by air or animals 
-If a pollen grain germinates, it gives rise to a pollen tube that discharges 
two sperm into the female gametophyte within the ovule  
•  The Evolutionary Advantage of Seeds (30.3c)  -A seed develops from the whole ovule  
-A seed is a sporophyte embryo, along with its food supply, packaged in a 
protective coat 
-Seeds provide some evolutionary advantages over spores 
 
~They may remain dormant for days to years, until conditions are      favorable for germination    ~They may be transported long distances by wind or animals   •  The gymnosperms have “naked” seeds not enclosed by ovaries (fleshy  fruit) and consist of four phyla:  
-Cycadophyta (cycads) 
-Gingkophyta (one living species: Ginkgo biloba
-Gnetophyta (three genera: Gnetum, Ephedra, Welwischia
-Coniferophyta (conifers, such as pine, fir, and redwood) 
•  Phylum Cycadophyta   -Individuals have large cones and palmlike leaves 
-These thrived during the Mesozoic, but relatively few species exist today 
-About 300 species alive today 
-Rare plant collectors are willing to steal these plants 
•  Phylum Ginkgophyta   -This phylum consists of a single living species, Ginkgo biloba  
-It has a high tolerance to air pollution and is a popular ornamental tree 
-Leaves remain little changed for 270 million years  
-Ginko biloba- Miracle cure? 
 
~Used as culinary ingredient    ~Many medicinal claims    ~Recent large study      -No benefit for memory        ~In Alzheimer’s        ~In Dementia  
background image •  Phylum Gnetophyta  -This phylum comprises three genera (see week 4 notes for different 
genera) 
-Species vary in appearance, and some are tropical whereas others live in 
deserts 
•  Phylum Coniferophyta (see textbook figure 30.4 for life cycle of a pine)  -This phylum is by far the larges of the gymnosperm phyla 
-Most conifers are evergreens and can carry out photosynthesis year 
round 
 
Angiosperms  •  Angiosperms (see textbook figure 30.12 for life cycle)  -Single phylum  
 
~Note, gymnosperms have multiple phyla, however, angiosperms         make up the majority of plants on the earth     ~Anthophyta    ~The root “Antho” comes from Greek for flower  -Seed Plants 
-Flowers 
-Fruits 
•  Flowers (see textbook figure 30.8)  -Specialized structure for sexual reproduction 
-Pollination by animals (insects, mammals, birds) and wind 
 
~Pollinator has a large effect on the adaptations of the flower      -Color      -Shape      -Scent    ~Gymnosperms are primarily wind pollinated because they don’t         have much to attract a pollinator  -Huge diversity in flower color and form 
-Diversity linked to pollination methods 
•  Amorphophallus titanium  -Titan arum 
-Largest unbranched inflorescence  
 
~Grows about 5-6 feet tall  -Corpse flower 
 
~Smells like rotting flesh when blooms      -Flies serve as the pollinator  -Only blooms for a couple days, making it very popular to watch during 
that time 
-Only found on Sumatra  
•  Rafflesia schadenbegiana   -Largest flower 
 
~1 meter diameter  -Bloom lasts 5-6 days 
-Corpse flower (see reasoning and pollinator in section above) 
background image -Indonesia and Malaysia   •  Wolffia arrhizia   -Smallest flower  •  The Carpel  -A carpel consists of an ovary at the base and a style leading up to a 
stigma, where pollen is received 
 
~Note, the pollen tube that grows from the pollen, contrary to        gymnosperms, has to travel a long way, all the way down the style       to the ovary  -Sometimes carpel is referred to as pistil 
 
~Much confusion regarding these terms    ~Pistil can be multiple fused carpels    ~If there is one carpel, then it is also a pistil  -The female gametophyte, or embryo sac, develops within an ovule 
contained within an ovary at the base of a stigma 
•  The Stamen  -Modified microsporophyll  
-Male part of flower 
-Anther 
 
~Microsporangium-pollen sacs  •  Floral Structure  -Complete Flower 
 
~Has all four modified leaves (sepals, petals, carpels, stamens)    ~Incomplete is missing one or more  -Perfect flowers 
 
~Have both male and female parts    ~Imperfect flowers are missing one or both  -Note, all perfect flowers aren’t complete flowers but all complete flowers 
are perfect flowers 
•  Selfing Plants  -Perfect flowers can theoretically self pollinate 
 
~Some plants have a very high frequency of selfing  -Plants can have mechanisms to prevent selfing; (inbreeding; there may 
be more reproductive success, but potentially less fitness) 
 
~Gametophytic Self Incompatibility       -Proteins prevent tube from growing    ~Heterostyly       -Stamens and Carpels are of different lengths    ~Sporophytic Self Incompatibility   •  Pollen  -Male gametophyte 
-Pollen structure influenced by dispersal methods 
-Exterior composed largely of Sporopollenin 
•  The Life of a Pollen  -A pollen grain that has landed on a stigma germinates and the pollen 
tube of the male gametophyte grows down to the ovary 
background image -The ovule is entered by a pore called the micropyle 
-Double fertilization occurs when the pollen tube discharges two sperm 
into the female gametophyte within an ovule 
-One sperm fertilizes the egg, while the other combines with two nuclei in 
the central cell of the female gametophyte and initiates development of 
food-storing endosperm 
-The endosperm nourishes the developing embryo 
•  Cotyledons   -Within a seed, the embryo consists of a root and one or two seed leaves 
called cotyledons 
 
~The first leaves that emerge from a seed    ~Gymnosperms have 2-24 cotyledons   -Hypogeal cotyledons stay below ground and do not photosynthesize 
 
~Often used for storage  -Epigeal cotyledons expand on germination and push off seed shell, 
photosynthesizing above ground 
-Cotyledons often bear little resemblance to the other leaves on the plant 
•  Fruit  -A fruit typically consists of a mature ovary but can also include other 
flower parts 
-Fruits protect seed and aid in their dispersal 
 
~Serve to attract animals to eat them and then disperse their seeds      through digestion  -Mature fruits can be either flashy or dry  •  Types of Fruits  -Simple Fruits 
 
~Ripened single or compound ovary within a single carpel  -Dry fruits 
 
~Achene: dandelions, strawberries    ~Legume: pea, peanut, bean    ~Samara: maple, ash, elm    ~Nut: acorn, beech, hazelnut    ~Fibrous Drupe: coconut, walnut  -Simple fleshy fruits 
 
~Berries: grapes, tomatoes, oranges    ~Drupes: stone fruits, olives, mangoes  -Aggregate fruits 
 
~Single flower with multiple carpels    ~Blackberries, raspberries  -Multiple fruits  
 
~Pineapple, breadfruit  •  Achene  -Small, hard, dry fruit 
-Fruit is on the outside 
 
~Ex.) Strawberry  •  Legume 
background image -Simple, dry fruit 
-Splits open when mature 
•  Nut  -Simple, dried fruit 
-The outside of the ovary becomes a hard shell 
-Doesn’t split open when mature (opposite of legume) 
•  Drupe  -Contains a fleshy exocarp and mesocarp 
-Hard endocarp 
 
~Fleshy on outside, hard on inside  -Stone fruits, coconuts, mangoes, olives   •  Berries  -Fleshy fruit from a single ovary 
-Pepo: special berry with hard rind on outside 
 
~Ex.) Watermelon, squash  •  Multiple fruits  -Inflorescence 
 
~Cluster of flowers    ~Each flower becomes a fruit    ~All fruits merge into one mass  •  Angiosperm Diversity (see textbook figure 30.16)  -The two main groups of angiosperms are monocots (one cotyledon; see 
notes above) and eudicots (“true” dicots) 
-The clade eudicot includes some groups formerly assigned to the 
paraphyletic dicot (two cotyledons) group 
 
~All eudicots share the same ancestor; not all “dicots” do  -Basal angiosperms are less derived and include the flowering plants 
belonging to the oldest lineages 
-Magnoliids share some traits with basal angiosperms, but are more 
closely related to monocots and eudicots  
•  Basal Angiosperms   -Three small lineages constitute the basal angiosperms 
-These include Amborella trichopoda, water lilies, and star anise  
•  Magnoliids  -Magnoliids include magnolias, laurels, and black pepper plants 
-Magnoliids are more closely related to monocots and eudicots than basal 
angiosperms 
•  Monocots  -More than one-quarter of angiosperm species are monocots 
 
~60,000 species    ~Flower parts come in multiples of 3      -Ex.) 6, 9    ~Often have parallel leaf veins  •  Palms  -Monocot 
-Evolved at the end of the Cretaceous 
background image -2,600 species 
-Tropical, subtropical, and warm climates 
-Example 
 
~Talipot Palm    ~Leaves up to 5 meters in diameter    ~Largest inflorescence of any plant  •  Grasses  -Monocot 
-Family Poaceae 
-9-10,000 species 
-Ex.) Bamboo, wheat, sugar cane, rye, maize  
•  Orchids   -Monocots 
-Not only considered the largest single family of monocots, but the largest 
single family of angiosperms (Asteraceae is comparable) 
- Approximately 22,000 species 
-Bilaterally symmetric 
-One pollinator 
•  Eudicots  -More than two-thirds of angiosperm species are eudicots 
-Very diverse species 
•  Evolutionary Links Between Angiosperms and Animals  -Pollination of flowers and transport of seeds by animals are two important 
relationships in terrestrial ecosystems 
-Clades with bilaterally symmetrical flowers have more species than those 
with radially symmetrical flowers 
-This is likely because bilateral symmetry affects the movement of 
pollinators and reduces gene flow in diverging populations  
•  Plants and Humans  -No group of plants is more important to human survival than seed plants 
-Plants are key sources of food, fuel, wood products, and medicine 
-Our reliance on seed plants makes preservation of plant diversity critical 
•  Products from Seed Plants  -Most of our food comes from angiosperms 
-Six crops (wheat, rice, maize, potatoes, cassava, and sweet potatoes)     
yield 80% of the calories consumed by humans 
-Modern crops are products of relatively recent genetic change resulting 
form artificial selection 
-Many seed plants provide wood 
-Secondary compounds of seed plants are used in medicines 
•  Threats to Plant Diversity  -Destruction of habitat is causing extinction of many plant species 
-Loss of plant habitat is often accompanied by loss of the animal species 
that plants support 
-At the current rate of habitat loss, 50% of Earth’s species will become 
extinct within the next 100-200 years 
background image  
Plant Structure 
•  Plant Anatomy (see textbook figure 35.2)  -Plants, like animals, are composed of organs made up of tissues, which 
are composed of cells 
-Three main organs include roots, leaves, and stems 
-Roots supply water and minerals to the plant 
-Leaves supply sugars to the plant 
-Stems supply support structure and transport systems 
•  Roots  -Roots are multicellular organs with important functions 
 
~Anchoring the plant    ~Absorbing minerals and water    ~Storing organic nutrients  -In most plants, absorption of water and minerals occurs near the root 
hairs 
(see textbook figure 35.3)where vast numbers of tiny root hairs 
increase the surface area 
•  Types of Roots  -Taproot system 
 
~One main vertical root    ~Lateral roots, or branch roots  -Adventitious roots 
 
~Can arise from stems or leaves  -Fibrous Roots 
 
~Seedless vascular plants and monocots    ~Thin lateral roots with no main root  •  Modified Roots (see textbook figure 35.4)  -Prop roots 
 
~Aerial roots    ~Add structural support  -Strangling roots 
 
~Grow around objects supporting the plant  -Strangler Figs 
 
~Epiphytes    ~Roots grow down and around tree    ~Stem grows up to sunlight  -Pneumatophores 
 
~Roots that rise up in the air    ~Pores allow gas exchange    ~Mangroves  -Buttress roots 
 
~Support large trees  -Storage root 
 
~Tap root    ~Lateral root  -Haustorial roots 
background image   ~Parasitic pants      -Examples: mistletoe, dodder, snow plants    ~Absorb water and nutrients from other plants  -Climbing root 
 
~Adventitious root    ~Supports climbing plants    ~Negatively phototropic       -Grows away from light    ~Examples: Ivies   •  Stems  -A stem is an organ consisting of 
 
~An alternating system of nodes, the points at which leaves are        attached    ~Internodes, the stem segments between nodes  -Axillary bud  
 
~Can form a lateral shoot, or branch (in other words, where growth        sideways occurs)  -Apical bud, or terminal bud 
 
~Located near the shoot tip and causes elongation of a young         shoot (in other words, where growth upward occurs)  -Apical dominance 
 
~Dormancy in most nonapical buds   •  Modified Stems (see textbook figure 35.5)  -Corm 
 
~Short underground storage stem    ~Examples: Taro, gladiolus, saffron  -Rhizome 
 
~Horizontal stem    ~Usually underground    ~Sends out roots, shoots (adventitious roots)    ~Examples: Ginger, poison oak, Bermuda grass  -Stolon 
 
~Horizontal stem    ~At the ground surface or just underground    ~Adventitious roots    ~Produces clone at the end of the stem    ~Examples: Strawberry, many grasses   -Bulbs 
 
~Underground stems    ~Have modified leaves      -Storage when dormant    ~Examples: Garlic, onion  •  Leaves (see textbook figure 35.6)  -The main photosynthetic organ of most vascular plants 
-Generally consist of a flattened blade and a stalk called the petiole, 
which joins the leaf to a node of the stem 
background image •  Modified Leaves (see textbook figure 35.7)  -Bracts 
 
~Associated with the reproductive structure    ~Often brightly colored    ~Examples: Bougainvillea, poinsettia   -Tendrils 
 
~Used for attaching for climbing    ~Can photosynthesize    ~Can be thigmotropic      -Grows toward touch    ~Example: Pea plant  -Spines 
 
~Used for defense    ~Common in xerophytes    ~Thorns and prickles are not the same as spines because they         aren’t modified leaves      -Thorns        ~Modified stems      -Prickles        ~Modified epidermis        ~Example: Roses  -Storage Leaves 
 
~Can store water, nutrients, and toxins    ~Succulents have these storage leaves      -Examples: Cacti, ice plants, agave  •  Plant Tissues (see textbook figure 35.8)  -Three types of tissues 
 
~Dermal    ~Ground    ~Vascular  •  Dermal Tissue System  -Epidermis 
 
~In non-woody plants  -Cuticle 
 
~Waxy coating    ~Helps prevent water loss from the epidermis  -Pericardium 
 
~In woody plants    ~Protective tissues    ~Replaces the epidermis in older regions of stems and roots  -Trichomes are outgrowths of the shoot epidermis and can help with insect 
defense 
•  Vascular Tissue System  -Carries out long-distance transport of materials between roots and shoots 
-Two vascular tissues 
background image -Xylem conveys water and dissolved minerals upward from roots into the 
shoots 
-Phloem transports organic nutrients from where they are made to where 
they are needed 
•  Vascular Tissue  -The vascular tissue of a stem or root is collectively called the stele 
-In angiosperms, the stele of the rot is a solid central vascular cylinder  
-The stele of stems and leaves is divided into vascular bundles, strands of 
xylem and phloem 
•  Ground Tissue System  -Tissues that are neither dermal nor vascular 
-Pith 
 
~Ground tissue internal to the vascular tissue  -Cortex 
 
~Ground tissue external to the vascular tissue  -Ground tissue includes cells specialized for storage, photosynthesis, and 
support 
 
Cellular Structure in Plants  •  Cells (see textbook figure 35.10)  -Plants have a diversity of cells that perform a variety of functions 
 
~Consider 5 general types      -Parenchyma      -Collenchyma      -Sclerenchyma      -Water conducting cells of the xylem      -Sugar-conducting cells of the phloem  •  Ground Tissue  -Composed of 
 
~Parenchyma    ~Collenchyma    ~Sclerenchyma  •  Ground Tissue Cells  -Mature parenchyma cells 
 
~Have thin and flexible primary walls    ~Large central vacuole    ~Lack secondary walls    ~Are the least specialized    ~Perform the most metabolic functions      -Store nutrients      -Photosynthesize    ~Retain the ability to divide and differentiate      -Key for cloning  -Collenchyma cells   ~Grouped in strands and help support young parts of the plant         shoot 
background image ~They have thicker and uneven cell walls 
~They lack secondary walls 
~These cells provide flexible support without restraining growth 
~Example: strings in a celery stalk are bundles of collenchyma cells  
  -Sclerenchyma cells       ~Rigid because of thick secondary walls strengthened with lignin      ~Dead at functional maturity       ~Have very thick cell walls relative to the cell inside the walls      ~Example: pears are grainy when bitten into due to bundles of         sclerenchyma cells      ~There are two types        -Sclereids are short and irregular in shape and have thick          lignified secondary walls          ~Source of hardness in nutshells and seed coats        -Fibers are long and slender and arranged in threads          ~Source of linen (flax fibers) and rope (hemp fibers)            -Linen is made from extracting fiber cells from              the plant  •  Vascular Tissue Cells   -Xylem cells 
 
~Cells are dead at functionality because it’s not easy to move water      through living cells because of the thick cytoplasm, while it’s easy       to move water through dead, hollow cells    ~Each cell has to be connected to allow water to move all the way         through the plant    ~Tracheids      -Found in all vascular plants      -Tubular, elongated and dead      -Water transfers via pits in the tracheids    ~Vessel Elements      -Larger diameter and shorter      -Aligned end-to-end to form vessels      -End walls have perforation plates  -Phloem Cells 
 
~Sieve-tube elements      -Alive at functional maturity        ~Active transport is always required for sugar to get           into a cell, which can only be performed by a living           cell      -They lack organelles, including nucleus      -Allows sugars to flow more easily    ~Sieve plates      -The porous end walls that allow fluid to flow between cells        along the sieve tube    ~Companion cell      -One for each sieve-tube element 
background image     -Nucleus and ribosomes serve both cells        ~Sends proteins etc. to sieve-tube elements to keep it          alive and able to perform active transport while not           having any organelles itself   
Cell growth 
•  Growth  -Indeterminate growth- growing throughout an organism’s life 
 
~Example: roots and shoots  -Determinate growth- some plant organs cease to grow at a certain size 
 
~Example: leaves  -Annuals complete their life cycle in a year or less 
-Biennials require two growing seasons and only bloom the second year 
-Perennials live for many years 
•  Where growth occurs  -Meristems  
 
~Perpetually embryonic tissue    ~Maintains indeterminate growth    ~Functionally similar to animal stem cells  -Apical Meristems 
 
~Located at the tips of roots and shoots and at the axillary buds of          shoots  -Primary growth occurs when apical meristems elongate shoots and 
roots (see textbook figures 35.13, 35.14, and 35.15 for root growth) (see 
textbook figures 35.16 and 35.17 for stem growth) 
-Secondary growth (see textbook figure 35.11 for types of growth) (see 
textbook figure 35.19 for stem growth) 
 
~Lateral meristems add thickness to woody plants, which is         required for structural support      -Two lateral meristems        ~Vascular cambium           -Adds layers of vascular tissue called              secondary xylem (wood) and secondary            phloem        ~Cork cambium          -Replaces the epidermis with periderm, which            is thicker and tougher  •  Secondary Growth (see textbook figure 35.22 for tree trunk anatomy)  -The vascular cambium is a cylinder of meristematic cells one cell layer 
thick 
 
~”Rings” go all the way up the tree trunk, hence, cylinders  -It develops from undifferentiated parenchyma cells  
-Secondary xylem accumulates as wood, and consists of tracheids, vessel 
elements (only in angiosperms), and fibers 
-Early wood, formed in the spring, has thin cell walls to maximize water 
delivery 
background image -Late wood, formed in late summer, has thick-walled cells and contributes 
more to stem support 
-In temperate regions, the vascular cambium of perennials is dormant 
through the winter  
 
~Stops growing cells    ~New growth is fragile and the thin-walled cells could burst due to        cold  -Tree rings are visible where late and early wood meet, and can be used 
to estimate a tree’s age 
-Dendrochronology is the analysis of tree ring growth patterns, and can be 
used to study past climate change 
 
~If the rings are closer together, that indicates that it was colder,      and if they are farther apart, that indicates that it was warmer  -As a tree or woody shrub ages, the older layers of secondary xylem, the 
heartwood, no longer transport water and minerals 
 
~Used for structural support  -The outer layers, known as sapwood, still transport materials through the 
xylem 
 
~In other words, only the more recent secondary growth is still          functioning as xylem  -Older secondary phloem sloughs off and does not accumulate    
Plant Anatomy 
•  Morphogenesis in plants, as in other multicellular organisms, is  often controlled by homeotic genes 
-Morphogenesis=a change in the structure in plants 
-Homeotic gene=influences where an organ is located on an organism 
•  Gene Expression and Control of Cellular Differentiation  -In cellular differentiation, 
 
~Cells of a developing organism synthesize different proteins and         diverge in structure and function even though they have a             common genome   -Homeotic genes 
-Positional Information 
 
~Where a cell is positioned determines what they will grow into  •  Location and a Cell’s Developmental Fate  -Positional information underlies all the processes of development: growth, 
morphogenesis, and differentiation 
-Cells are not dedicated early to forming specific tissues and organs 
-The cell’s final position determines what kind of cell it will become  
•  Shifts in Development: Phase Changes  -Plants pass through developmental phases, called phase changes, 
developing from a juvenile phase to an adult phase 
 
~Juvenile phase=not sexually mature    ~Adult phase=sexually mature  -Phase changes occur within the shoot apical meristem 

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Colorado State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
27 Pages 60 Views 48 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Colorado State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Colorado State University
Department: Biology
Course: Biology of Organisms-Animals and Plants
Professor: Jennifer Dewey
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Biology
Name: Life103, Exam 2 Study Guide
Description: This is a type of study aid for exam 2. If you need help understanding anything on the document, please let me know!
Uploaded: 03/04/2016
27 Pages 60 Views 48 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to CSU - LIFE 103 - Study Guide
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to CSU - LIFE 103 - Study Guide

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here