×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UWM - BIO 104 - Class Notes - Week 7
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UWM - BIO 104 - Class Notes - Week 7

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UWM / Biology / BIO SCI 104 / What is the meaning of a specific epithet?

What is the meaning of a specific epithet?

What is the meaning of a specific epithet?

Description

 PLANT TAXONOMY 


What is the meaning of a specific epithet?



∙ Scientific Names are written in italics.

∙ Eg: Taraxacum officinale

Taraxacum: Genus name

Officinale: specific epithet

∙ Specific epithet: describes the plant

∙ Common name tells you something important about the plant ∙ Red maple is commonly found in Wisconsin

∙ Swamp maple is commonly found in Chicago

∙ Important plant families:

1. Daisy

2. Grass

3. Pea

4. Mustard

5. Mint

6. Parsley

7. Potato/tomato

∙ Daisy- biggest family

∙ Daisy is not a flower, it’s an inflorescence


Where is swamp maple commonly found?



∙ Grass family:

o Very important in terms of agriculture

o We get most of our calories here, whether we eat a grain or an animal  fed with those grains

o Doesn’t have petals but still a flowering plant

∙ Bract : leaf like structures on a flower stalk

∙ Legume: very characteristic flower

o Large petal that sticks up in the air

o Some smaller petals

o 5 petals total

o Great source of protein

 Mint:  

-square stem, opposite leaves

-herbaceous plant

 Parsley:  

-Umbelli (flower stalk) ferae- old scientific name for parsley

-fruit produced: 2 fused half fruits


What are the important plant families?



 Potato/Tomato

-Solanaceae

-alkaloid in this family called Solana

-eggplant, potato, tomato, capsicum, tobacco

-agriculturally usefulDon't forget about the age old question of What is the meaning of formal social control?

-5 petals: fused together

 Example 1 : Flower Fly

-Kingdom: Animal

-Phylum: Anthropa

-Class: Insect

-Order: Diptera

-2 wings for flying

 Example 2 : Eg Canis Familiaris

-Kingdom: Animalia

-Phylum: Chordata

-Class: Mammalia

-Order: Carnivora

-Family: Canidae

-Genus- Canis

-Species: Familiaris

FUNGI, ALGAE AND CYANOBACTERIA 

 These aren’t Plants

 Fungi:

-Eukaryotic cells

-Heterotrophic (like animals)

-require a food molecule

 Multicellular fungi

 Fungal body-mycelium made of hyphae (long cellular cells)  Fungi secretes digestive enzymes

 Fungi have symbiotic relationship with many plants

 Symbiosis: Fungi tap into root of plant Don't forget about the age old question of How do i start a farmers market in my community?

 Plant is getting increased surface area through which it can take up water   Yeast-can produce both sexually and asexually  

 Yeast: single celled

 In the right conditions, yeast can rapidly multiply

 Sexual reproduction: yeast produces spores in dry conditions  Yeast can make enough ATP anaerobically to survive

 ALGAE

-eukaryotic cells

-photosynthetic

-single/multicelled

-almost all are aquatic and photosynthesis

-motile/ non-motile

-example: kelp

 GREEN ALGAE

-plants didn’t evolve from green algae, but the ancestors of plants can be  traced to this group We also discuss several other topics like What is the meaning of recombination frequency?
If you want to learn more check out Data allow a researcher to do what?
If you want to learn more check out What is the concept of contingency?
Don't forget about the age old question of What is the most significant agent of socialization?

 Cyanobacteria

(Not part of Protista)

-it’s in the BACTERIA domain

-they pull nitrogen out of air/water and make it biologically active

 SYMBIOTIC RELATIONSHIPS

-2 partners walking close together to mutually benefit each other

 LICHENS- not a plant

-relationship between fungi and algae

-relationship between autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms -Fungi get fed out of this deal

-no roots, get nutrients from rain

-adapted to low nutrient levels

 NOTE: Asexual reproduction is much faster than sexual reproduction but NO  genetic diversity

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here