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KSU / Architecture / ARCH 20112 / What is the most typical vaulting type during the high gothic period?

What is the most typical vaulting type during the high gothic period?

What is the most typical vaulting type during the high gothic period?

Description

Kayla Schmidt


What is the most typical vaulting type during the high gothic period?



9-15-15

History of Architecture 2

Took Pre-test for first 20 minutes of class

Notes

Gothic Period

Gothics- barbarians who invaded Rome

San Denis -1135-44, Abbot Suger

 


Bourges is more daring than chartres because?



∙ Semi-circular arches on the façade

∙ Archibald

∙ One tower

o Ran out of resources to build another tower

∙ Chevet

o Ignore main nave- rebuilt in high gothic We also discuss several other topics like You perform a cross between a heterozygous tall pea plant and a homozygous short pea plant and obtain 30 tall plants and 20 short plants in the f1 generation. assuming standard mendelian inheritance of this character, how many tall and short plants would

o West front

o Apse

o Ambulatory

▪ Curves around apse

▪ Every arch is a different size

o Radiating chapels

o Do not have a solid wall between the chapels so this is different from  

Romanesque radiating chapels

o Light is a big deal


Notre dame in paris is a what church?



o All of the vaulting has a pointed arch—pointed profile

o Pointed arch-consisted vault height

▪ Light can flow through the chevet

o This was a dramatic interest

o Vaults- built the ribs first, then they filled in the web If you want to learn more check out What are the three aspects of the industrial revolution?

▪ Didn’t have to include wooden

Kayla Schmidt

o Later on when we talk about High Gothic-the stained glass will be introduced  

more

Looking at primarily France—eventually spread throughout Europe

Pointed arch- two-centered arch

Light and space unifying

Constructing Gothic Cathedrals

Laon Cathedral 1160-1200

  We also discuss several other topics like How do we measure inequality?

∙ Twin tower façade

∙ Flying buttresses added later

∙ Portal entrances

∙ Large rose window—clerestory lighting

∙ Nave arcade

∙ Tribune gallery

∙ Triformium  

o Shed roof that covers the aisle

∙ Gothic cross vaults

Kayla Schmidt Don't forget about the age old question of What is additive model?

o Groin vault with a twist

o 6 webs to it

∙ Intended to have spires  

o Did not do this because of time and money

Notre Dame, Paris

  We also discuss several other topics like What does protestantism do?

1155-1196 initial construction

1196-1250 west front

1250-70 rebuilt vaults

1296—1325 radiating chapels If you want to learn more check out How many people are there in the us base on the 2010 census?

Bishop Maurice  

∙ Nice balance of horizontal and vertical

o Square format

o Blind arcade

∙ Fleche

o Timber and lead cover structure

o Transept arm

∙ Nave

o Flying buttresses introduced later

∙ Apse- surrounded by radiating chapels

o Dramatic flying buttresses—later on

o Stain glass—later on

∙ Crockets

∙ Fineals

o Small spires

∙ Gargoyles—sometimes used as scuppers  

∙ Scuppers

o To kick out water

Kayla Schmidt

9-17-15

Notes

Continuation to the notes from 9-15-15

Notre Dame, Paris

∙ Sexpartite vault

o Diagonal ribs

o Transverse ribs

∙ Clicker quiz

o Notre Dame in Paris is a ____ church:

▪ Answer: Some of the above---High Gothic and Early Gothic

High Gothic in France

∙ Chartres Cathedral. 1194-1260

∙ St. Etienne, Bourges 1195-1250

∙ Amiens Cathedral 1220-36

Clicker quiz: The most typical vaulting type during the High Gothic period

Answer: quadripartite vaulting

Chartres Cathedral. 1194-1260

∙ Cathedral burned down—reused façade—Romanesque cathedral that was then rebuilt with  High gothic style

∙ Two different towers

∙ Wanted to have a 5 aisle plan---fell a little short of that plan

Kayla Schmidt

∙ Flying buttresses  

o massive

∙ Blues and reds—forming purple color

o Purple symbolizes royalty

o Stain glass makes it darker in the interior

o To create a worship space

∙ Double velocity

o Quadruple wind speed

∙ Wind pressures become more important in the High Gothic period

o Additional flyer—to take care of the roof

∙ Quadripartite vaulting

o Looks thin but in reality its massive

o ∙ Iron system and copper sheets---for the roof

∙ Lead caused roofers to have a low life expectancy rate

∙ 9 towers

o Only built 2 of them

o Financially not surviving

∙ Tympanum sculpture—they came from the Romanesque period

o Marian Cult

▪ Warming pull to a mother figure

▪ “Our Lady”

▪ Matthew-angel

▪ John-eagle

▪ Luke-ox

▪ Mark-lion

St. Etienne, Bourges 1195-1250

Kayla Schmidt

∙ Nave in the center—2 aisles (self-buttressing)

∙ Piers are thin--- Chartres Cathedral. 1194-1260 piers were twice as thick

∙ Sexpartite vaulting

o Small clerestory windows

o Clerestory windows by the aisles

∙ Light comes in horizontally rather than from above---light came from above at Charters ∙ 40% less stone

∙ Cost twice as less than Chartres

∙ Clicker quiz: Bourges is more daring than Chartres because:

o Answer: it uses way less materials for construction

Amiens Cathedral 1220-36

 

∙ Concept---trying to visually make the structure look light weight to make it feel like it was a  miracle that it was still standing

∙ Blend of verticality of towers and decorative horizontal strips

o Opening towers up

Kayla Schmidt

∙ Rose window—light in the nave under vaulting

o Later on captures this flaming façade (14th century)

∙ Massive clerestory

∙ Nave arcade—closer to the same height as clerestory

∙ Located in War zones

o Take glass to the crypt to protect it

∙ Cracking on the outside wall

o Not a huge concern

∙ Thin system

∙ Quadripartite vaulting

o Umbrella

∙ Glazed triformium  

La Sainte Chapelle 1241-48

 

∙ Built by Louis IX to house Holy Land relics; fragments of the Crown of Thorns and the Ture Cross ∙ Small church compared to this period

∙ Attached to the palace of the king

∙ Don’t need flying buttresses

∙ Don’t have a transept

∙ Lower church vs. upper church---two tiered

∙ Feel like you’re in a greenhouse

Kayla Schmidt

9-15-15

History of Architecture 2

Took Pre-test for first 20 minutes of class

Notes

Gothic Period

Gothics- barbarians who invaded Rome

San Denis -1135-44, Abbot Suger

 

∙ Semi-circular arches on the façade

∙ Archibald

∙ One tower

o Ran out of resources to build another tower

∙ Chevet

o Ignore main nave- rebuilt in high gothic

o West front

o Apse

o Ambulatory

▪ Curves around apse

▪ Every arch is a different size

o Radiating chapels

o Do not have a solid wall between the chapels so this is different from  

Romanesque radiating chapels

o Light is a big deal

o All of the vaulting has a pointed arch—pointed profile

o Pointed arch-consisted vault height

▪ Light can flow through the chevet

o This was a dramatic interest

o Vaults- built the ribs first, then they filled in the web

▪ Didn’t have to include wooden

Kayla Schmidt

o Later on when we talk about High Gothic-the stained glass will be introduced  

more

Looking at primarily France—eventually spread throughout Europe

Pointed arch- two-centered arch

Light and space unifying

Constructing Gothic Cathedrals

Laon Cathedral 1160-1200

 

∙ Twin tower façade

∙ Flying buttresses added later

∙ Portal entrances

∙ Large rose window—clerestory lighting

∙ Nave arcade

∙ Tribune gallery

∙ Triformium  

o Shed roof that covers the aisle

∙ Gothic cross vaults

Kayla Schmidt

o Groin vault with a twist

o 6 webs to it

∙ Intended to have spires  

o Did not do this because of time and money

Notre Dame, Paris

 

1155-1196 initial construction

1196-1250 west front

1250-70 rebuilt vaults

1296—1325 radiating chapels

Bishop Maurice  

∙ Nice balance of horizontal and vertical

o Square format

o Blind arcade

∙ Fleche

o Timber and lead cover structure

o Transept arm

∙ Nave

o Flying buttresses introduced later

∙ Apse- surrounded by radiating chapels

o Dramatic flying buttresses—later on

o Stain glass—later on

∙ Crockets

∙ Fineals

o Small spires

∙ Gargoyles—sometimes used as scuppers  

∙ Scuppers

o To kick out water

Kayla Schmidt

9-17-15

Notes

Continuation to the notes from 9-15-15

Notre Dame, Paris

∙ Sexpartite vault

o Diagonal ribs

o Transverse ribs

∙ Clicker quiz

o Notre Dame in Paris is a ____ church:

▪ Answer: Some of the above---High Gothic and Early Gothic

High Gothic in France

∙ Chartres Cathedral. 1194-1260

∙ St. Etienne, Bourges 1195-1250

∙ Amiens Cathedral 1220-36

Clicker quiz: The most typical vaulting type during the High Gothic period

Answer: quadripartite vaulting

Chartres Cathedral. 1194-1260

∙ Cathedral burned down—reused façade—Romanesque cathedral that was then rebuilt with  High gothic style

∙ Two different towers

∙ Wanted to have a 5 aisle plan---fell a little short of that plan

Kayla Schmidt

∙ Flying buttresses  

o massive

∙ Blues and reds—forming purple color

o Purple symbolizes royalty

o Stain glass makes it darker in the interior

o To create a worship space

∙ Double velocity

o Quadruple wind speed

∙ Wind pressures become more important in the High Gothic period

o Additional flyer—to take care of the roof

∙ Quadripartite vaulting

o Looks thin but in reality its massive

o ∙ Iron system and copper sheets---for the roof

∙ Lead caused roofers to have a low life expectancy rate

∙ 9 towers

o Only built 2 of them

o Financially not surviving

∙ Tympanum sculpture—they came from the Romanesque period

o Marian Cult

▪ Warming pull to a mother figure

▪ “Our Lady”

▪ Matthew-angel

▪ John-eagle

▪ Luke-ox

▪ Mark-lion

St. Etienne, Bourges 1195-1250

Kayla Schmidt

∙ Nave in the center—2 aisles (self-buttressing)

∙ Piers are thin--- Chartres Cathedral. 1194-1260 piers were twice as thick

∙ Sexpartite vaulting

o Small clerestory windows

o Clerestory windows by the aisles

∙ Light comes in horizontally rather than from above---light came from above at Charters ∙ 40% less stone

∙ Cost twice as less than Chartres

∙ Clicker quiz: Bourges is more daring than Chartres because:

o Answer: it uses way less materials for construction

Amiens Cathedral 1220-36

 

∙ Concept---trying to visually make the structure look light weight to make it feel like it was a  miracle that it was still standing

∙ Blend of verticality of towers and decorative horizontal strips

o Opening towers up

Kayla Schmidt

∙ Rose window—light in the nave under vaulting

o Later on captures this flaming façade (14th century)

∙ Massive clerestory

∙ Nave arcade—closer to the same height as clerestory

∙ Located in War zones

o Take glass to the crypt to protect it

∙ Cracking on the outside wall

o Not a huge concern

∙ Thin system

∙ Quadripartite vaulting

o Umbrella

∙ Glazed triformium  

La Sainte Chapelle 1241-48

 

∙ Built by Louis IX to house Holy Land relics; fragments of the Crown of Thorns and the Ture Cross ∙ Small church compared to this period

∙ Attached to the palace of the king

∙ Don’t need flying buttresses

∙ Don’t have a transept

∙ Lower church vs. upper church---two tiered

∙ Feel like you’re in a greenhouse

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