×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to KSU - FIN 26074 - Class Notes - Week 4
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to KSU - FIN 26074 - Class Notes - Week 4

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

KSU / Finance / FIN 26074 / What is the process of selecting the jury members?

What is the process of selecting the jury members?

What is the process of selecting the jury members?

Description

School: Kent State University
Department: Finance
Course: Legal Environment of Business
Professor: Timothy ludick
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: FIN 26074, Ludick, Lecture Notes, week 5, september 30, 9/30, Legal Environment of business, business, Legal, and Kent State University
Cost: 25
Name: Week 5 lecture notes (9/30)
Description: There was A LOT of information this week! Main focus was the trial process. And ways to resolve matters.
Uploaded: 10/01/2015
12 Pages 6 Views 18 Unlocks
Reviews

Zack Wang (Rating: )


Andrew Schuster (Rating: )



FIN 26074­001 THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS­ Lecture 5 Notes (9/30) Side note: There was a lot of information this week!!!


What is the process of selecting the jury members?



*Most cases are resolved before the trial even takes place*

­The Trial­

∙ A trial by jury must be requested when individual first approaches the court with an issue. o Criminal cases: 

 If it is a misdemeanor then the defendant has a very limited time to request a jury. 

 If it is a felony the defendant has to waive their right for a jury trial.

∙ Potential jury members (primarily for civil cases) are chosen from two lists: o 1. Registered voters list

o 2. Licensed driver list

∙ Process of selecting the jury members 

o Voir dire­ “speak the truth”. An examination that allows attorneys to find  out more about these potential jurors. They want to aim for a group of jurors  that will be fair. A lengthy process. 


What is the purpose of the trial?



 The jurors should have no preconceived perception of who should win or lose

 They should have no bias or prejudice to a certain party. 

 They should not have significant knowledge of the case yet. 

 They should not be related or connected to one of the parties. 

o Jurors can be removed from perspective list by PEREMPTORY CHALLENGE.  This is when a perspective juror gives the lawyer correct answers about  being fair and not having a bias BUT, for some reason (that the lawyer is  not obligated to share) something didn’t seem right about the juror for  the case. If you want to learn more check out privilege-disadvantage dialectic

  The perspective juror may have subtly communicated something to the lawyer that they felt might hurt their client.

∙  It could be something in the language they used, something in 


What are the two primary parts of a litigation?



If you want to learn more check out yvette is trying to persuade her sister dakota. yvette wants dakota to let her borrow her favorite dress. yvette tells a heartrending tale about how she doesn’t have a suitable dress, and she’ll feel so lonely if she has to miss the school dance. yvette’s

particular they said, tone of voice, posture or other nonverbal 

communications. 

 Lawyers cannot exclude jurors based on gender or race.

∙ Example: If the case was about a rape, they can’t say they don’t  If you want to learn more check out ∙ What is psychosocial health?

want women on the jury.

 On the other hand jurors can be excluded if they are somehow related to a  group. 

∙ For example; if a women is married to a police officer and the case

involves police, she may be excluded for that reason.

∙ After the jury is selected the attorneys give opening statements

o These opening statements may inform the jury of what they will encounter and  the significance of it. 

o Attorneys also might admit that their client has done some stupid things, but they  ask the jury to keep an open mind until they have heard all the evidence.   Sometimes that is used so that the jury doesn’t jump to conclusions. The  other party’s attorney might jump on those stupid things right away, so it  kind of serves as a warning and reminder. 

∙ The purpose of the trial is to determine what happened using EVIDENCE.  o The basic rules of evidence. (Goal of these rules is to have information that is  submitted be reliable, credible, relevant and fair. The judge or magistrate  ultimately decide what evidence is submitted to the jury) Don't forget about the age old question of art 111 cal poly

 The best evidence rule

∙ Means just that. Original documents, not copies. 

 Privileged Communications Rule­ this pertains to witnesses who have  confidential information. Basically, if one of these people are put on the  stand and asked questions that would release any confidential information, the person is not allowed to say anything, and is protected by this rule. Relationships this includes:

∙ 1. Attorney/Client relationship: this allows the client to tell the 

attorney EVERYTHING they need to know, and the attorney  If you want to learn more check out abnormal psychology final exam study guide

cannot share info unless disclosed by the client, even after the case 

is closed. Created because clients would not tell attorney 

everything for fear that they might go talk about it. This rule does 

not allow that to happen.

∙ 2. Doctor/Patient relationship: A doctor has to know exactly 

what happened in order to treat the patient. Everything the patient 

says is confidential, any statements made by the patient to the 

doctor is privileged information. 

∙ 3. Priest/Parishioner: could be for any religion. Parishioner 

cleanses themselves by confessing wrongdoings. This 

communication is also confidential and cannot be released.

∙ 4. Husband/Wife: this confidentiality is only found in SOME 

states, NOT including Ohio. 

 Leading question rule

∙ A leading question is when an attorney suggests an answer by 

the demeanor of the question.

∙ This is prohibited. Attorney is not able to do that. 

∙ However, if they do, but the other party’s attorney does not bring it to the attention of the courtroom, then the info is still received by 

the jury. 

∙ The attorneys are kind of like the “referees” for the 

courtroom. They make objections and they must let the judge  If you want to learn more check out fi 321 textbook notes

know of any violations that the other is making. 

 Hearsay evidence

∙ Evidence that a person did not actually receive directly.

∙ Exception: 

o Statements made by the party themselves. Generally it is 

allowed for a witness to say “this party said this”.

∙ Witnesses 

o Brought into the court 

 sub poena(court order compelling) or sub poena duces tecum(medical  report/physical evidence)

o If a witness does not show up

 Attorney’s job to get the evidence there. They are the ones who should  have gotten witnesses there using sub poena or sub poena duces tecum.  Just asking a witness to show up is not enough. 

∙ Direct examinations

o Attorneys asks questions directly to witnesses.

o The witness is either directed to answer the question or not based on rules of  evidence

o Trying to prove that the other party is responsible.

∙ Cross examinations

o The defendant’s attorney tries to prove opposite of what was proved in the direct  examination. 

o “Attack” the plaintiff.

o Tries to make witness look bad/unreliable. 

∙ Redirect

o Back to plaintiff attorney who rehabilitates the witness if need be and explains the witness better

∙ Back to a cross examination then done for that witness.

∙ This continues until all the witnesses have gone and all the evidence has been presented. ∙ Plaintiff rests case.

o At this point the defendant can ask for directed verdict by the judge. Judge can  rule that the defendant won. 

o This usually happens when and if the plaintiff just did not have a good case or  weak evidence. It’s like in baseball when the other team has so many runs that it’s just pointless to keep going. If there is no evidence against the defendant, judge  will just end it. 

o If the defendant rests the case then both parties can ask for directed verdict.  If plaintiff rests case then only defendant can ask for directed verdict.  (mostly used in criminal cases)

∙ If the court does not grant a directed verdict then trial moves on. Lawyers put together  proposed legal instructions. 

∙ Judge reads these instructions to the jury and then the jury hears the closing statements by each attorney. 

∙ Jury then makes a decision on the basis of the information provided at the trial. This  decision is made in private away from the court room, judge, and attorneys. ∙ Once the jury comes to a decision they read it in open court to everyone and then the  judge will release them. There are two types of decisions a jury can come to: o A general verdict: the jury agrees that the plaintiff was injured (or won the case)  and names the amount of damages that they think the plaintiff should receive. Or  no award at all.

o A special verdict:  an attorney may request that the jury answer specific  questions. Questions that need to be liberated. For example, if it was about a car  crash, did the truck go left of center? Or other specific questions they want  answered. Was one party more at fault than the other? What percentage were they at fault? The jury will also decide amount of damages here as well. 

∙ After the jury is dismissed, does not mean trial is over. The judge can be asked to  alter the determination of the jury. 

o The changing of  the jury verdict

 Concept of remittur­defendant asks judge to reduce money damages  awarded. Judge agrees with the verdict but not the amount. 

 Concept of additory­ plaintiff wins but amount too low. Allows the judge  to increase the amount of award. Only in some states! NOT in Ohio. 

 Motion for a new trial­ if some fraud by one of the parties or attorneys  occurs. Ability for one of them to convince the judge that it was unfair and that the trial needs to be restarted. 

∙ The two primary parts of a litigation

o Winning­ the “easy” part

o Collecting on winnings­ the difficult part

 The loser will have a lot of animosity and be very upset and angry

 Many people are uncollectable or have no assets to give.

∙ Once a judgement has been made usually the winning party will have to file a second  lawsuit to collect their winnings.

∙ Enforcing a judgement

o Procedures in obtaining the winnings from the losing individual

 Garnishment­ The individual’s employer is joined as a third party. They  are ordered to withhold money from the individual’s wages and send into  the court. Usually about 25% from each paycheck. 

 Attachment of bank accounts­ if the defendant has a bank account the  bank is brought in as third party. The bank is ordered to give the money in  the individual’s bank account to the courts.

 Execution­ (NO not the death penalty!) Personal property will be ceased  by the sheriff and sold and proceeds will go to the court.

 Foreclosure against real estate­ if the individual owns property, foreclosed ∙ Other ways to address a litigation

o Negotiations­ can take place before during or after, process of persuading  someone to do what you want them to do

 Styles of negotations

∙ Avoiding

∙ Accomodating

∙ Competing

∙ Collaborating

∙ Compromising (hardest to demonstrate)

 Two Methods of negotitating

∙ 1. Positional negotiation­ parties begin by stating what their 

expectations are. They work to try and bargain with one another to 

come to an agreement on what they should do.

∙ 2. Principled Negotiation­ concentration on 7 elements to remove 

barreiers created by positional negotiating.

o 1. Communication

o 2. Relationship

o 3. Interests

o 4. Options

o 5. Legitimacy

o 6. Alternatives

o 7. Commitment

o Mediation­ a mediator involved that facilitates the party to come to a settlement  Used because

∙ 1. Parties retain control over when to settle

∙ 2. Costs less. There is no presentation of evidence which reduces 

the role of a lawyer.

∙ 3. Reduction of the legal system governing the process

 The Process

∙ Mediator’s intro and explanation

∙ Parties’ opening statements

∙ The exchange between parties (negotiation)

∙ Think of possible options or solutions

∙ The agreement which is written and signed

∙ Private sessions which are optional at mediator’s discretion

o Arbitration­ an expertise on a particular subject is brought in to decide merits of  dispute. They are called the arbitrator. 

 Private proceeding, no public record

 Substitute for litigation

  The parties will authorize an arbitrator to make a decision and resolve the  dispute. 

FIN 26074­001 THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS­ Lecture 5 Notes (9/30) Side note: There was a lot of information this week!!!

*Most cases are resolved before the trial even takes place*

­The Trial­

∙ A trial by jury must be requested when individual first approaches the court with an issue. o Criminal cases: 

 If it is a misdemeanor then the defendant has a very limited time to request a jury. 

 If it is a felony the defendant has to waive their right for a jury trial.

∙ Potential jury members (primarily for civil cases) are chosen from two lists: o 1. Registered voters list

o 2. Licensed driver list

∙ Process of selecting the jury members 

o Voir dire­ “speak the truth”. An examination that allows attorneys to find  out more about these potential jurors. They want to aim for a group of jurors  that will be fair. A lengthy process. 

 The jurors should have no preconceived perception of who should win or lose

 They should have no bias or prejudice to a certain party. 

 They should not have significant knowledge of the case yet. 

 They should not be related or connected to one of the parties. 

o Jurors can be removed from perspective list by PEREMPTORY CHALLENGE.  This is when a perspective juror gives the lawyer correct answers about  being fair and not having a bias BUT, for some reason (that the lawyer is  not obligated to share) something didn’t seem right about the juror for  the case.

  The perspective juror may have subtly communicated something to the lawyer that they felt might hurt their client.

∙  It could be something in the language they used, something in 

particular they said, tone of voice, posture or other nonverbal 

communications. 

 Lawyers cannot exclude jurors based on gender or race.

∙ Example: If the case was about a rape, they can’t say they don’t 

want women on the jury.

 On the other hand jurors can be excluded if they are somehow related to a  group. 

∙ For example; if a women is married to a police officer and the case

involves police, she may be excluded for that reason.

∙ After the jury is selected the attorneys give opening statements

o These opening statements may inform the jury of what they will encounter and  the significance of it. 

o Attorneys also might admit that their client has done some stupid things, but they  ask the jury to keep an open mind until they have heard all the evidence.   Sometimes that is used so that the jury doesn’t jump to conclusions. The  other party’s attorney might jump on those stupid things right away, so it  kind of serves as a warning and reminder. 

∙ The purpose of the trial is to determine what happened using EVIDENCE.  o The basic rules of evidence. (Goal of these rules is to have information that is  submitted be reliable, credible, relevant and fair. The judge or magistrate  ultimately decide what evidence is submitted to the jury)

 The best evidence rule

∙ Means just that. Original documents, not copies. 

 Privileged Communications Rule­ this pertains to witnesses who have  confidential information. Basically, if one of these people are put on the  stand and asked questions that would release any confidential information, the person is not allowed to say anything, and is protected by this rule. Relationships this includes:

∙ 1. Attorney/Client relationship: this allows the client to tell the 

attorney EVERYTHING they need to know, and the attorney 

cannot share info unless disclosed by the client, even after the case 

is closed. Created because clients would not tell attorney 

everything for fear that they might go talk about it. This rule does 

not allow that to happen.

∙ 2. Doctor/Patient relationship: A doctor has to know exactly 

what happened in order to treat the patient. Everything the patient 

says is confidential, any statements made by the patient to the 

doctor is privileged information. 

∙ 3. Priest/Parishioner: could be for any religion. Parishioner 

cleanses themselves by confessing wrongdoings. This 

communication is also confidential and cannot be released.

∙ 4. Husband/Wife: this confidentiality is only found in SOME 

states, NOT including Ohio. 

 Leading question rule

∙ A leading question is when an attorney suggests an answer by 

the demeanor of the question.

∙ This is prohibited. Attorney is not able to do that. 

∙ However, if they do, but the other party’s attorney does not bring it to the attention of the courtroom, then the info is still received by 

the jury. 

∙ The attorneys are kind of like the “referees” for the 

courtroom. They make objections and they must let the judge 

know of any violations that the other is making. 

 Hearsay evidence

∙ Evidence that a person did not actually receive directly.

∙ Exception: 

o Statements made by the party themselves. Generally it is 

allowed for a witness to say “this party said this”.

∙ Witnesses 

o Brought into the court 

 sub poena(court order compelling) or sub poena duces tecum(medical  report/physical evidence)

o If a witness does not show up

 Attorney’s job to get the evidence there. They are the ones who should  have gotten witnesses there using sub poena or sub poena duces tecum.  Just asking a witness to show up is not enough. 

∙ Direct examinations

o Attorneys asks questions directly to witnesses.

o The witness is either directed to answer the question or not based on rules of  evidence

o Trying to prove that the other party is responsible.

∙ Cross examinations

o The defendant’s attorney tries to prove opposite of what was proved in the direct  examination. 

o “Attack” the plaintiff.

o Tries to make witness look bad/unreliable. 

∙ Redirect

o Back to plaintiff attorney who rehabilitates the witness if need be and explains the witness better

∙ Back to a cross examination then done for that witness.

∙ This continues until all the witnesses have gone and all the evidence has been presented. ∙ Plaintiff rests case.

o At this point the defendant can ask for directed verdict by the judge. Judge can  rule that the defendant won. 

o This usually happens when and if the plaintiff just did not have a good case or  weak evidence. It’s like in baseball when the other team has so many runs that it’s just pointless to keep going. If there is no evidence against the defendant, judge  will just end it. 

o If the defendant rests the case then both parties can ask for directed verdict.  If plaintiff rests case then only defendant can ask for directed verdict.  (mostly used in criminal cases)

∙ If the court does not grant a directed verdict then trial moves on. Lawyers put together  proposed legal instructions. 

∙ Judge reads these instructions to the jury and then the jury hears the closing statements by each attorney. 

∙ Jury then makes a decision on the basis of the information provided at the trial. This  decision is made in private away from the court room, judge, and attorneys. ∙ Once the jury comes to a decision they read it in open court to everyone and then the  judge will release them. There are two types of decisions a jury can come to: o A general verdict: the jury agrees that the plaintiff was injured (or won the case)  and names the amount of damages that they think the plaintiff should receive. Or  no award at all.

o A special verdict:  an attorney may request that the jury answer specific  questions. Questions that need to be liberated. For example, if it was about a car  crash, did the truck go left of center? Or other specific questions they want  answered. Was one party more at fault than the other? What percentage were they at fault? The jury will also decide amount of damages here as well. 

∙ After the jury is dismissed, does not mean trial is over. The judge can be asked to  alter the determination of the jury. 

o The changing of  the jury verdict

 Concept of remittur­defendant asks judge to reduce money damages  awarded. Judge agrees with the verdict but not the amount. 

 Concept of additory­ plaintiff wins but amount too low. Allows the judge  to increase the amount of award. Only in some states! NOT in Ohio. 

 Motion for a new trial­ if some fraud by one of the parties or attorneys  occurs. Ability for one of them to convince the judge that it was unfair and that the trial needs to be restarted. 

∙ The two primary parts of a litigation

o Winning­ the “easy” part

o Collecting on winnings­ the difficult part

 The loser will have a lot of animosity and be very upset and angry

 Many people are uncollectable or have no assets to give.

∙ Once a judgement has been made usually the winning party will have to file a second  lawsuit to collect their winnings.

∙ Enforcing a judgement

o Procedures in obtaining the winnings from the losing individual

 Garnishment­ The individual’s employer is joined as a third party. They  are ordered to withhold money from the individual’s wages and send into  the court. Usually about 25% from each paycheck. 

 Attachment of bank accounts­ if the defendant has a bank account the  bank is brought in as third party. The bank is ordered to give the money in  the individual’s bank account to the courts.

 Execution­ (NO not the death penalty!) Personal property will be ceased  by the sheriff and sold and proceeds will go to the court.

 Foreclosure against real estate­ if the individual owns property, foreclosed ∙ Other ways to address a litigation

o Negotiations­ can take place before during or after, process of persuading  someone to do what you want them to do

 Styles of negotations

∙ Avoiding

∙ Accomodating

∙ Competing

∙ Collaborating

∙ Compromising (hardest to demonstrate)

 Two Methods of negotitating

∙ 1. Positional negotiation­ parties begin by stating what their 

expectations are. They work to try and bargain with one another to 

come to an agreement on what they should do.

∙ 2. Principled Negotiation­ concentration on 7 elements to remove 

barreiers created by positional negotiating.

o 1. Communication

o 2. Relationship

o 3. Interests

o 4. Options

o 5. Legitimacy

o 6. Alternatives

o 7. Commitment

o Mediation­ a mediator involved that facilitates the party to come to a settlement  Used because

∙ 1. Parties retain control over when to settle

∙ 2. Costs less. There is no presentation of evidence which reduces 

the role of a lawyer.

∙ 3. Reduction of the legal system governing the process

 The Process

∙ Mediator’s intro and explanation

∙ Parties’ opening statements

∙ The exchange between parties (negotiation)

∙ Think of possible options or solutions

∙ The agreement which is written and signed

∙ Private sessions which are optional at mediator’s discretion

o Arbitration­ an expertise on a particular subject is brought in to decide merits of  dispute. They are called the arbitrator. 

 Private proceeding, no public record

 Substitute for litigation

  The parties will authorize an arbitrator to make a decision and resolve the  dispute. 

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here