×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UH - POLS 113 - Class Notes - Week 1
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UH - POLS 113 - Class Notes - Week 1

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UH / Political Science / POLS 113 / What do implementation provisions that statute to do?

What do implementation provisions that statute to do?

What do implementation provisions that statute to do?

Description

School: University of Houston
Department: Political Science
Course: Health Law
Professor: Mantel
Term: Spring 2015
Tags:
Cost: 25
Name: Outline/Class Notes
Description: This is a stat reg outline from law school covering all material and cases throughout the semester.
Uploaded: 10/09/2015
94 Pages 62 Views 1 Unlocks
Reviews


Stat Reg. Outline


What do implementation provisions that statute to do?



Structure of a Modern Statute (p.166):

Title: the formal title states the basic purpose or function of the statute. 

Enacting clause: meant to proclaim the fact that the statute has become law.  Short Title: for the sake of reference. (Also called popular name)

Statement of Purpose, Preamble, and findings 

Definitions: typically, but not always appear at the beginning of the statute. 

Operative Provisions: the heart and soul of the statute. Contain the result the statute is  trying to achieve or the state it is attempting to create. May also contain exceptions. 

Subordinate Operative Provisions: supportive of or secondary to the main  objective. 

Implementation Provisions: legs and arms of the statute. They enable the statute to do  what it purports to do. Criminal sanctions and penalties. “The Teeth”


Where do statutes come from?



** (Statutes do not always separate their operative and implementation provisions. Are combined in older statutes).

Specific repeals and related amendments: if a statute either repeals of amends another  statute, then it may contain a statement to that effect. 

Preemption Provision: bars the application of state law. 

Exception­ Expiration Date­ a statute may contain a provision indicating that it will  expire or “sunset” on a specific date. 

Criminal statutes are different than regular interpretations because they are seen more narrowly,  to be fairer to the public. How do you determine specific definitions (dictionaries should match  the purpose)? What are legislative’s history’s limits? Absurd Result­ look to the result reached  by the statute in a variety of situations and see if it’s logical or not (ex­ women pushing a baby  carriage in a park). Also page 17.


What is the difference between drafting legislation and introducing it?



If you want to learn more check out What's a commerce clause?
Don't forget about the age old question of What are the goals of effective message creation?

WHERE STATUTES COME FROM? (IN ORDER)

∙ The legislative process: any legislation passed has to go through both houses of congress  (bicameralism) and be signed by the President.  If you want to learn more check out What is head diplomat?

∙ Good Advice: Intervene early and often. Participate in the drafting and hearings process.  Build relationships before you bring the bill. 

1

Ex­ apple settlement for children downloading apps on their parents account. Apple held  parents responsible. Is there a legislative response that might be merited and how could that  be brought about? Yes. Group would like a statute that says a computer manufacturer cannot  hold the parent responsible for downloads of minors in their families.  Don't forget about the age old question of What is an impact of tourism?

1) The ability to draft legislation is open to the public, but the ability to introduce it is  limited and has windows of time. You could also hire lobbyists to draft legislation.  You  select a legislator to introduce your bill (which districts are most friendly and which  legislator cares). 

a. Congressional legislators are the ones who can draft and introduce legislation into a session of Congress. 

2) Referral­ hearings before a committee. But there are lots of committees, so who chooses  which one it goes to? The speaker of the house. Matters how you draft the text of your  bill. Some committees may be more receptive than others. So you can help influence  which one you go to. The speaker of the house can also refer to multiple committees if he thinks they apply. 

a. Once you’re in front of the committee, you have a hearing that generates  information needed and gives a committee report. Then it is referred back to the  house. 

b. In the senate, who makes the decision? Senate presiding officer. 

3) Floor Scheduling­ huge differences between house and senate. The House has more  rules related to scheduling, where the senate does not. The more important the issue, the  faster it will be heard. If it’s controversial, it gets put on the calendar as a major bill.  House has the ability to make rules (germane). In the senate, there are no special rules.  You can filibuster­ you have to have unanimous consent of the senate to proceed on  scheduling of the bill (not the bill itself).  We also discuss several other topics like Define colonialism.

**Opposing group options: Now an opposing group (computer association) joins the scene and  wants to kill the bill. It would be logical to try and kill it during the hearings process. You could  also select your own legislator. 90% of bills die. One other reason a lot of bills die is how it gets  calendared. Minority group can filibuster in the senate. 

Vetogates that will automatically result in the death of pending legislation: 1) failure by the  speaker of the house to refer the bill to committee and 2) a majority of the committee which has  received the bill fails to report it back to the house or senate.  We also discuss several other topics like What is pectin?

4) Floor Consideration­ the house floor: only people that speak are the representatives  themselves. Amendments can be made in order to try to get people to vote with you. You  write the rules as you go. Senate can filibuster at this level again. 

o Budgets and appropriations get moved up and passed faster. 

2

5) Reconciliation­ we have passed the house and the senate, but now have two bills.  Now you have to reconcile the two together. The house or the senate could also choose  one bill or the other instead of combining. Also, a conference committee could generate  their own report, important for interpretation purposes 

o This is the final killing zone in congress. 

6) President­ The president can sign or veto the bill. However, the president doesn’t have to veto it in order for it to die. He can just not sign it within 10 days and “pocket veto” it,  so if the congressional term ends before it’s signed, then it’s vetoed and can’t be brought  back because congress is out. If congress isn’t out, they could overturn the veto by a 2/3 

vote. President can also use a signing statement­ giving their statement of interpretation  of the bill and/or ordering the executive branch whether to enforce. 

Lobbyists and Law Firms­ most lawyers charge for services on an hourly basis or on a  contingency basis (% of the winnings). Lobbyists are not providing legal research or showing up  in a courtroom, but know people and get paid by retainer (a lump sum). Get paid on a monthly  basis as to whether or not they’re needed. Most law firms can’t hold onto lobbyists because it’s  harder for them to see their economic return. 

Review Question Example: If the governor of Texas chooses not to sign a bill that has passed  both chambers of the Texas legislature with less than 15 days left in the current legislative  session, he has allowed the bill to become law. 

WHAT ACTUALLY GOES INTO WRITING A BILL?

Legislative drafting process; the whole process is intensely collaborative. ∙ Dickerson’s suggestions for Legislative Drafting­ 

1) Collect the facts (significant and relevant facts)

2) Think of related law (harmonize with existing laws and know what the current  laws are).

3) Outline

4) Think of your legislative audience (be simple and understood for general  public, but sometimes levels of specificity can be required)

5) Vertically­ draftsman ties to deal with all the problems affecting each 

successive segment. Writing it top to bottom. 

6) Horizontally­ try to deal with only one or two problems at a time for the bill as  a whole.  

This gets sent to committee which can mark up or change your bill/statute. It is never only under  the control of one person or the original writer. Then, the calendar leads to floor debate, where it  3

can be changed even more. The drafting process provides some kind of structure, but the bill will still go through a hodge podge of change. 

Legislators might have to make changes and corrections to the bill on the fly (“doing the bill on  the floor”). Specific fears of drafting on the floor include:

∙ Provisions being “slipped in” 

∙ People losing track of whether one provision squared with another 

∙ A provision being added to satisfy the needs of a senator in trouble for reelection  What do legislators do in order to get a bill passed they may not agree on? ­ Use passive language, 

­ Make diction more ambiguous (gets decided by courts and agencies),  ­ Drafting may be intentionally bad. 

Three Theories of the Legislative Process: 

1) Public Choice Theory­ models voters, politicians, and bureaucrats as mainly self interested. To move towards a medium decision. Deeply cynical view of politics.  Economics is based on the rational man who makes decisions that are the best for  himself. Just replace money with politics. They will act rationally in order to maximize  their individual holdings, whether or not it is good for the public as a whole. The general  held beliefs of the population can be outweighed by the higher cares of special interest  groups (even though there’s less people). Politicians will act in ways that will get them  re­elected. 

2) Social Choice Theory­ combines individual opinions, preferences, interests, or welfare  to reach a collective decision or social welfare in some sense. Mathematical formula for  what order you vote in. How people actually vote­ the mechanics, not the values. If you  structure a vote with different timing and tiers, then it can affect the answer each time. 

3) Positive Political Theory­ strategically vote to get something in the long term, even  though it may go against their current beliefs. Vote for Hilary Clinton, so Obama would  not get the democratic election. Takes gain theory and self­conscious predictions to see  how people will make voting decisions. 

Problems with Snack Attack Statute:  

1) Impossibility­ wrong time; does Shipleys even make dairy free kolaches? 4

What do you do with a statute that has impossible provisions? You can try to interpret the statute within semantic range in order to satisfy the point of the statute. How far can a  court push the language?

2) Indefinite Term­ If a statute fails to specify the time frame for its operation, the court  typically can imply a term or time from general language in the statute as needed to  effectuate its statutory purpose.  Of course, this rule isn’t hard and fast – for example, a  court might not be able to infer an effective time frame for a statute if it creates an  ambiguity that causes constitutional issues by imposing a retroactive criminal liability. 3) Excessive Specificity­ don’t limit yourself.  

4) Veto Bate­ unacceptable parts that effect the provision. Don’t be too outlandish.  5) Preemption/Integration Question­ Must look at university policy in regards to  attendance and see how that applies to the statute. Is this classroom allowed to have food  in it? 

Why is a statute different than a contract? There is nothing in the constitution limiting  congress’ power to target one person, statutes and contracts can both be conditional, but a  contract must have consideration, whereas statutes do not.  

THEORIES OF STATUTE INTERPRETATION

Tool of Statutory Interpretation­ is an instrument for ascertaining the meaning of a statute,,  like the dictionary. 

Theory of Statutory Interpretation­ a normative view of how courts should interpret statutes.  Concern the role of our courts in our governance system. A particular theory of statutory  interpretation may lead a court to exclude or deemphasize particular tools. 

∙ Textualism­ permits courts to rely on dictionaries as a source of statutory meaning, but  prohibits them from relying on indications of legislative intent in the legislative history.  Text should be the sole tool of interpretation. This has become the starting point for  most interpretation now. 

∙ Intentionalism­ instructs courts to implement legislative intent, even when that intent is  not clear from the plain meaning of the statutory text and discernible only through other  sources, like legislative intent. (More specific than Purposivism). Look for the specific  intent that congress had when passing the statute. 

∙ Purposivism­ courts began to shift their focus away from the actual intent of Congress to the broad purposes of the statute. Look to the larger purpose of congress and interpret the  statute in a way to achieve that purpose. 

5

∙ Legal Process Purposivism­ when there is ambiguity in the statute, the courts should  determine what a reasonable legislature would have sought to achieve in the  circumstances. (Kinds of seems like the reasonable person standard).

∙ Imaginative Reconstruction­ it applies when congress failed to appreciate an issue and  therefore, cannot be understood as having an intention as to that issue. Asks the court to  stand in the shoes of congress. When congress has not stated an intent or purpose, the  court should imagine what congress (or a “reasonable” congress) would have said when  faced with a particular question. 

∙ Dynamic Interpretation­ sees courts more as partners with congress than as faithful  agents of the enacting congress in developing the meaning of statutes. Courts are  applying their own understandings and values in order to interpret statutes. 

∙ Absurd Result Doctrine­ most controversial. Look to page 17 for application.

**Look at text first, then at the structure of the statute. If there’s still ambiguity then an intentionalist will look to what congress intended, then look to absurd results doctrine (result should not be clearly unacceptable). Look to intent and then purpose. ** 

Church of the Holy Trinity v. United States­ does the federal law prohibiting bringing in foreign  labor apply to a church paying for the importation of their new pastor? No. 

∙ The court held that the term "laborer" in the federal statute applied only to cheap  unskilled labor, and not to professional occupations, such as ministers and pastors  (Textualism). Even though it does not actually say this in the statute. For this, the Court  looked to intention.  

o Ex­ like when they claimed that they did not think “Congress intended” for the  law to apply in the present case. 

∙ You can argue that the words are ambiguous because we don’t know what kind of  “labor” the statute meant to prohibit. Statutes’ purpose was to prohibit foreign manual  labor, which was ruining the US work market (the court looked to legislative history for  this). The senate report said that they recommended changing “labor” to “manual labor”, but they didn’t change it because they wanted the bill to get passed. 

o Arguments against legislative history use­ you can cherry pick legislative history  to find things to support your position, instead of looking at review as a whole. If  they meant to say it, then they should/would have said it. The note provides  exclusions for artists, actors, and so on… by not mentioning pastors, the statute  meant to include them. Statute claims “any person” “in any manner whatsoever” 

6

for “service of any kind”, so Congress was attempting to make the statute very  broad. 

∙ “Absurd result” doctrine­ (pg 17) could thwart the development of religion in the US  by not allowing pastors to come in. Not a great argument because they’re referencing  people from before America was a country (Christopher Columbus and the King of  Spain). 

o Can the court just change the parts that make it “absurd” or do they have to scrap  the whole thing? Usually, a court will not override one portion of the statute.  However, congress can expressly state that the rest of the statute remains in effect  even if the courts declare one portion of it unconstitutional; think of it as a  statutory severability clause. 

∙ Take Away Idea: Reflects the widely shared assumption that the primary role for our  courts is to serve as “faithful agents” of congress in interpreting statutes, that is, to  “identify and enforce the legal directives that an appropriately informed interpreter would conclude the enacting legislature meant to establish”.

SETS OF TEXTUAL TOOLS USED TO INTERPRET STATUTES How do we figure out what the words mean in the statutes? 

Ordinary Meaning vs. Technical Meaning: 

The plain meaning rule directs courts to give effect to the text if it has a plain meaning— that is the text is not only a starting point but the stopping point. The plain meaning rule, also  known as the literal rule, is a type of statutory construction, which dictates that Statutes are to be interpreted using the ordinary meaning of the language of the Statute unless a Statute explicitly  defines some of its terms otherwise. 

Nix v. Hedden­ Duty imposed on vegetables, but not fruit. P brought tomatoes into the country  and tried to argue that they were fruit, and therefore not subject to tax. Holding­ tomatoes are  vegetables. How to determine the meaning of the word: 

1) Atomic level: look to dictionary definitions; but different dictionaries can give different  definitions. How do you choose which one to use? The court uses 3 different dictionaries, but doesn’t rely on any of them for judgment. 

a. Judicial notice­ the court acknowledges a commonly accepted and known fact,  but doesn’t establish its existence by admitting evidence to support it; used  infrequently. Here, common use of the word vegetable encompasses tomato, even  though botanical definition declares a tomato a fruit. 

i. What would people expect? People deserve to have notice of the law that  way they don’t accidentally violate it. 

7

2) No special meaning accorded to “fruit” or “vegetables” in the industry or trade. Used  witnesses, who had been in the business for 30 years and asked them the definitions.  Looks to setting. 

3) Ordinary Meaning and Cultural notions (common language) ­ tomatoes usually eaten  as vegetables for dinner. Looks to audience. Court will use terms accessible to the public for penal statutes. 

Muscarello v. United States­ United States won the case in a 5­4 decision. Is the phrase “carries a firearm” limited to the carrying of firearms on the person, or does it apply more broadly to  having the firearm in your car? 

∙    18 USC Statute 924 (c)(1): “Whoever, during and in relation to any crime of violence or  drug trafficking crime…uses or carries a firearm…” gets an automatic sentence of 5  years.    

∙    Reasons for the majority’s broad interpretation: No special legal meaning; congress  intended for usual common English meaning. So, you can “carry” a firearm with you in  transport, in your car. Carry actually came from the ancient word for “cart”. (SC goes  into definitions provided by King James Bible, Melville, and Defoe­ great writers must  know the language). They also surveyed news articles and modern press (2/3 of news  stories used “carry” in the way of “conveyance”). Precedent. 

o    Acknowledges ambiguity, but cites that lenity can only be invoked if the statute  has a grievous ambiguity. There is a threshold for allowable ambiguity. Every  statute, no matter how perfectly drafted, will have some type of ambiguity. 

∙    [Dissent]: transport is a better word for carry. Majority was cherry picking from a  spectrum of possible definitions. There is more than one possible definition. They want to use the word “carry” narrowly. If there’s ambiguity, it should go for the defendant  because of the principle of lenity (pg 13). 

CANONS OF CONSTRUCTION

Courts almost always start with the text itself, and then expand outward to other statutory  provisions, statute structure, and other statutes. Move from narrow to broad.  

Canons of Construction can be divided into 3 broad categories: 

       1) Textual Canons

a) Linguistic Canons­ grammar or syntactic cannons; rules or presumptions about how  words fit together within a particular provision. Based on grammar, punctuation, or  associated words in a particular provision.

8

b) Whole Act Canons­ presumptions or rules about the meaning of a term in relation to  other terms, phrases, or provisions in the same statute. If you are comparing the text  in one provision to the text in other provisions of the same statute, you are invoking a  whole act canon. 

c) Whole Code Canons­ seek to make sense of a word in light of other statutes in the US Code. If you are seeking to reconcile the text of one stature with the text of another  statute, you are invoking a whole code canon.

       2) Substantive Canons 

       3) Other Canons (absurd results and scrivener’s errors)

Babbitt v. Sweet Home Chapter of Communities for a Great Oregon: court trying to determine  whether the word “take” in the endangered species act includes the definition of “harm”, which  would include habitat modification that kills or injures wildlife. SC rules that it does. 

∙    ESA makes it criminally and civilly actionable to cause the death of any endangered  animal. 3(19): “Take” means harassing, harming, pursuing, hunting, shooting, wounding, killing, capturing, or collecting. 50 CFR 17.3: “Harm” means an act which actually kills  or injures wildlife…may include significant habitat modification”. 

∙   Arguments for inclusion of harm definition: 

o   Textual Canon: Justice Stevens relied on the textual maxim ejusdem generis to  define the term “harm” in the same fashion to other specific terms used in the  statutory definition of “take”. 

o   Linguistic Canon: term defined explicitly. Who defined it? The department of the interior defined it through the reading of the statute.  

o    Avoid surplusage of excess words in 3(19). What does harm include that the  other terms don’t already capture? Harm could be seen as a catch all. 

o    Legislative intent/purpose­ meant to be a broad and inclusive act. 

∙ Arguments for exclusion of harm definition: 

o    Noscitur a sociis (you know a word by its associates) Interpret the word “harm”  with the words around it; the common characteristic from a list of words. 

o    Congress’ Intent: Congress left out private corporations and individuals for a  reason, only mentioned federal agencies in section 7 of the act. Section 9’s  absence of explicit standards for private corporations. 

 Expressio Unius: the express mention of one thing excludes all others.

9

o    Normal definition of harm requires direct action and intent (cultural norm­  common understanding of the word harm because the statute applies to a very  wide audience). 

o   Legislative History: one congressman has offered the comment that if there’s a  habitat restriction, the government can buy it. 

A) LINGUISTIC CANONS

Linguistic Canons are useful for interpreting words in the narrowest text in which they appear:  within the provision of a statute. While a court will generally give identical words and phrases in  a statute the same meaning, it can ignore this fundamental canon and define the same word in the same statute differently if it has reason to believe that Congress used that term in two different  sense. 

The three most prominent canons are known by Latin phrases: 

1. Ejusdem Generis: “of the same kind” 

∙    When a statute sets out a series of specific items ending with a general term, the general  term is confined to covering subjects comparable to the specifics it follows. The catch­all  is bound and restricted by the list itself. 

∙    When general words follow a list of specific words in a statutory enumeration, the  general words are construed to embrace only objects similar in nature to the objects  enumerated by the preceding specific words. Ex: “….and other acts”. 

∙     Ali v. Federal Bureau of Prisons (U.S. 2008): 

o   Claim for lost items can’t apply to “any officers of customs or excise or any other law officer”. Does this statute apply to a prison officer/guard when an inmate’s  things that have been taken disappear? No­ court determine ejusdem generis  didn’t apply because the list doesn’t share a common attribute and includes  “disjunctive” pairings. 

2. Noscitur a Sociis: “a thing is known by its companions” or “known by the company it keeps” 

∙    This is a tool to clarify the meaning of a broad catch all term at the end of a list of more  specific terms; a word is given more precise content by the neighboring words with  which it is associated. Aims to ensure that a term is interpreted consistently with  surrounding words so as not to unduly expand statutes beyond their reasonable reach. 

o   Will not apply when a court finds no common feature linking the terms  surrounding the one in question (same as Ejusdem Generis). Can either narrow or  broaden. 

10

∙    United States v. Williams: Statute that essentially has a catch all that criminalizes actions  regarding child pornography. Applies to anyone who “advertises, promotes, presents, or  solicits” child pornography. What does “present” mean and does this make the statute too broad, as to violate the 1st amendment? 

o    The broad meaning “presents” is narrowed because of the words around it,  dealing with commercial transactions to convey the information and promote the  industry. Used Noscitur a Sociis. 

o    What about a delivery man who doesn’t know what’s in the package? Wouldn’t  apply because of the other words in the list. He would not be promoting or  advertising child pornography in any way because he is not aware of what he’s  doing. 

3. Expressio Unis: “the mention of one thing is the exclusion of another” 

∙    Courts apply the canon when they can infer from the inclusion of one term that the  omission of another term was intentional. If you don’t say it, then you meant for it to  be excluded. (Puts a tremendous burden on Congress). Inference that items not mentioned were excluded by deliberate choice, not inadvertence or by accident. 

∙    Again, requires that the group shares a characteristic or association. 

More Specific Variations of Expressio Unis Include:     

∙    A list of specific exceptions to a general prohibition means that Congress intentionally  excluded any further exceptions. 

o Ex­ If there’s one exception listed, that means that all other exceptions were  purposefully excluded.

∙    If the statute requires an action to be performed in a particular way (compliance), that  requirement reflects a decision by Congress to prohibit other ways to perform that action.

o Ex­ By making organizations work a certain way, you are purposefully excluding  any other way that they could do things­ even if they’re better, faster, or cheaper. 

∙    When congress specifies a mode of preemption for a statute, the courts will not imply  additional areas of preemption based on the substantive provision of the statute (so  Congress intended to foreclose other general types of preemption. 

o Ex­ Congress can intentionally draft preemption which trumps state preemptions. Other Linguistic Canons: 

11

∙    Punctuation: alone is rarely sufficient to sustain or contradict an interpretation.  Arguments based on punctuation are less strong that those based on other tools or canons. The deadly comma (“knowingly”), limited weight of parentheticals.  

∙    The Last Antecedent Rule: a limiting phrase only applies to the clause immediately  before it, and doesn’t migrate upward through the statute. 

o Ex­ the errant teenager’s house party. 

∙    Conjunctive v. Disjunctive: terms connected by a disjunctive (like “or”) should be given separate meanings, unless the context dictates otherwise. When a court senses a “careless  usage”, it may substitute “or” for “and” and vice versa. 

∙    May v. Shall: the word “may” connotes a permissive or discretionary action, whereas the word “shall” connotes a mandatory one. *Note the ambiguity of shall. FRCP had a  massive rewrite to purge this problem.

∙    The Dictionary Act (p.  277): federal statute enacted by congress “to supply rules of  construction for all legislation” (1871). Attempts to define terms commonly used in  federal statutes. But there are some parts that have been updated to deal with current  issues. Federal courts have not found it binding on their ability to exercise full judicial  review or disagree with those definitions. 

o   Also, Texas has its own Code Construction Act which defines words and how to  interpret them. (serves similar and other purposes)

B) WHOLE ACT CANONS

The whole act rule instructs courts to view statutory terms as a part of the entire legislation in  which they were enacted. There are several more concrete principles regarding whole act canons:

1)    Identical Words—consistent/identical meaning

2)   Avoiding Redundancy and Surplusage: it is a cardinal principle of statutory  construction that a statute ought upon the whole, to be so construed that, if it can be  prevented, no clause, sentence, or word shall be superfluous, void, or insignificant. 

Maxims that fall within the whole act canon:  

(1) Title: However, title alone is not controlling. Positive ex­ holy trinity invoked the title of  the statute to support its conclusion. 

(2) Provisos: are clauses that state exceptions to or limitations on the application of a statute for example­ “provided that…” While a proviso customarily applies to the clause  immediately preceding it, courts can apply it more broadly. 

12

C) WHOLE CODE CANONS

The whole code rule directs courts to construe language in one statute by looking to language in  other statutes. Like the whole act rule, the whole code rule has more specific sub­rules” 

∙    In pari materia: statutes addressing the same subject matter generally should be read ‘as  if they were one law’. Under this canon, a later act can be regarded as a legislative  interpretation of an earlier act in the sense that it aids in ascertaining the meaning of  words used in their contemporary setting. 

o    ***Assumes that whenever Congress passes a new statute, it acts aware of all  previous statutes on the same subject.*** 

∙    Inferences across statutes: when congress uses the same language in two statutes having similar purposes, particularly when one is enacted shortly after the other, it is appropriate  to presume that Congress intended the text to have the same meaning in both statutes. 

∙    Repeals by implication: repeals by implication are not favored and will not be presumed  unless the intention of the legislature to repeal is clear and manifest. 

What to look at when dealing with a statute:  

∙    For words: dictionary, common law definition, technical meaning, and judicial notice  (when the court, under its own power, acknowledges a fact that everybody already knows something). 

∙    For sentences/paragraph: Ejusdem Generis, Noscitur a Sociis, Expressio Unis, or v. and,  the last antecedent rule, may v. shall, parenthetical (punctuation). 

∙    For past the paragraph: whole act canon, then the whole code rule (largest entity), in pari  materia, titles and provisos, identical words=identical meaning, avoiding surplusage. 

MORE SUBSTANTIVE CANONS OF CONSTRUCTION:

Rule of Lenity: most fundamental universally held of all the canons we’ll study. Whenever  the language of the statute is ambiguous, the court will rule in the defendant’s favor. Directs  courts to resolve “doubts” or ambiguities in criminal statues in favor of criminal defendants. The  punishment is too severe to rely on ambiguous language. There is nothing of greater punishment  than to deprive you of your liberty.

∙     How ambiguous does a statute need to be before the court invokes the rule of lenity? Generally, a court will insist on a substantial ambiguity that it cannot resolve through  traditional tools of statutory construction.  As we saw in Muscarello, though, justices can  strongly disagree on how much ambiguity must exist in a statute before a defendant can  successfully invoke the rule of lenity.

13

∙    United States v. Santos: gambling and money laundering case. Court has to decide if the  word “proceeds” in the case, refers to gross income or net income (profits). Court holds  that it refers to profits because of the rule of lenity: because the statute was ambiguous in  this regard, they interpreted it in favor of the Defendant. 

o    Merger Problem. Ex­ You can commit crimes that can be prosecuted under  several different statutes. So a lesser offense may apply because higher offenses  requires different elements to be proven. Money laundering is not necessarily the  same thing as gambling. They are two offenses that might fall under this statute. 

∙ Alito Dissent: what does proceeds mean? Looks at other statutes (but they were after this  one, so it’s not legislative history), but he tries to look at what they were thinking.  However, Alito is looking at state statutes to interpret a federal law! 

o    “Absurd results doctrine” he is looking at an outcome that could be cast in terms  that the statute doesn’t make sense unless you interpret it a certain way. 

∙ If there is a split case (4­4­1) you go with the interpretation that is narrowest.  In Texas, the legislature has told the courts not to apply the rule of lenity to penal statutes. 

Remedial Purposes Canon: usually for civil statutes. When the legislature passes a statute  to address a specific ill, then the courts will broadly interpret that statute to achieve the purpose  of remedying that ill. 

∙   “Remedial legislation should be construed broadly to effectuate its purpose”. For a statute  to be deemed remedial, it must have been directed at remedying a prior problem. 

∙    Ex­ anti­discrimination statutes or reforms. Once a court determines that a statute is  remedial, it then construes that statute broadly in order to effectuate its purposes. 

∙    Remedial Purposes are usually treated dismissively because most statutes are in some  way remedying a problem. 

The Canon of Constitutionality: requires a court to avoid interpretations of statutes that  render them unconstitutional or raise serious doubts about their constitutionality, at least when  other interpretations of the statute are permissible. There are two primary formulations of the  doctrine: 

1) Unconstitutionality Canon: (Traditional Form­ narrower) ­ the doctrine provides as  between two possible interpretations of a statute, by one of which it would be  unconstitutional and by the other valid, the court’s plain duty is to adopt the one which  will save the act    . There must be ambiguity in the statute in the 1st   place.  

a.   This rule is a categorical one, meaning that every reasonable construction must be  resorted to, in order to save a statute from unconstitutionality. 

14

b.   One of the interpretations has to be declared unconstitutional (harder to prove).  This is the stronger Canon!

2) Constitutional Avoidance Canon (Modern Variant) ­ the doctrine requires that a statute  must be construed, if fairly possible, so as to avoid not only the conclusion that it is  unconstitutional, but also grave doubts upon that score. Courts should avoid  interpretations that raise a serious question as to the constitutionality of a statute. 

a.   There just has to be enough unconstitutionality to bring up a red flag, not be  proven. 

b.   Two elements required to invoke the constitutional avoidance canon: 

(1)    Some ambiguity in the language of the statute that creates multiple    interpretations. 

(2)    One of those interpretations has to have serious constitutional 

problems/doubts.

Zadvydas v. Davis: whether the statute authorizing detaining of a removable alien should be  interpreted as being allowing indefinitely or only for a period reasonably necessary to secure the  alien’s removal? Implicit “reasonable time” limitation. 

∙    Constitutional Avoidance Canon used: Where there are two interpretations, one of  which would raise serious constitutional problems, the court should always choose the  interpretation that does not. (i.e. only for a reasonable time, because indefiniteness raises  a 5th amendment concern). 

o   The court does not have to prove that the other option would definitely be  unconstitutional, only that it would raise “grave doubts” upon the issue. 

o   Ambiguity required­ there has to be more than one way to interpret the statute. 

∙    Justice Breyer thinks 6 months is a reasonable period of time. They use this same time  period for other administrative purposes, so 6 months is good for uniformity. After 6  months, the immigrant presents evidence that the US can rebut. They’re stuck there until  they can present evidence. The longer you sit in the cell, the higher the government’s  burden is to prove that you should be there (continuing threat).  

∙    Dissent: there is no ambiguity in the statute, so the constitutional avoidance canon should  not be applicable.

Almendarez­Torres v. United States: P was an alien who after being deported for the commission of an aggravated felony unlawfully returned to the US. Just returning to the US would cause  them to be imprisoned for not more than 2 years, but returning with an aggravated felony would  cause them to be imprisoned for not more than 20 years. 

15

∙    Issue: Does part of the same statute define a separate crime or simply authorize an  enhanced penalty? It was a penalty provision that allowed the court to increase the  sentence for a recidivist who had committed an aggravated felony. 

∙    What was the reasoning why justice breyer decided this was not a free standing crime, but rather an enhanced penalty? Legislative history and intent. Focuses on the degree of  certainty (amount needed to trigger the constitutional avoidance doctrine is lacking).  Ambiguity here is not strong enough for cons. avoidance. 

∙    If this wasn’t a penalty, then it would be a separate crime that the US would have to  prove. Who decides? The judge, as opposed to a jury of your peers. Justice Scalia’s  dissent focuses on the text. He disagrees with justice breyer as to the canon of  constitutional avoidance. He thinks the issue of a jury trial is a constitutional issue raised.

∙    Rule of Lenity could apply: this is a penal statute with 20 possible years imprisonment.  Where the statute is ambiguous, they rule in favor of the defendant. Breyer doesn’t think  the statute is ambiguous, so he didn’t mention it in his opinion. 

FEDERALISM CLEAR STATEMENT RULE

Federalism Clear Statement Rule: Under this rule, the courts will not interpret a statute in a  way that impinges on matters of core state sovereignty unless Congress has clearly and directly  stated that it wishes to do so. Protects federalism interests. Courts will not implement language  which would unduly unhinge on the sovereignty of the state unless it was clearly stated. This is a legislative drafting principle. 

Gregory v. Ashcroft: Two petitioners, both Missouri state judges, challenged the state  constitution’s retirement requirement (70 years old). They claimed that it violated the ADEA act  (federal age discrimination in employment act). 

∙    Issue: Does the Missouri mandatory retirement requirement for state judges violate the  federal age discrimination in employment act? No. 

o    In Gregory, the appointment of judges fell into the category of core state  sovereign functions, and the Court demanded that Congress expressly state that it  meant for the Americans with Disabilities Act to apply to state judges.

(Federalism clear statement rule). 

∙    ADEA does not apply to “policy­making” appointees, such as state court judges.  Governor Ashcroft looks at the plain language of the statute to determine the meaning.  The judges were appointed by the governor and then re­elected (but the 1st appointment is what matters). 

16

o   Noscitur a Sociis: looks to the language of the statute to determine that since  exemptions 1 and 3 refer only to those in close working relationships with elected  officials, so too much 2. 

∙    Court employed the rational basis test: there is a reasonable relationship between  Missouri’s goal of promoting competent state judges and its retirement requirement. 

∙   ***Justice O’Connor said that Congress had to be clearer in their statements and acts if  they were going to take away state’s rights (in this case, ADEA was ambiguous). They  had to write their statutes in a clear way, or the court would not interpret them the way  they wanted­ drafting principle. (federalism clear statement rule) 

o   Whenever Congress intends to alter the federal­state balance, it must do so  expressly in the statute. 

TYPES OF PREEMPTION

Presumption against Preemption: the presumption rests on the notion that the historic  police powers of the states are not to be superseded…unless that was the clear and manifest  purpose of congress. 

∙    The presumption against preemption “provides assurance that the federal­state balance  will not be disturbed unintentionally by congress of unnecessarily by the courts”. 

∙    The presumption against preemption states a default as to how a statue should be  construed (I.e. so as not to preempt state law) that can be overcome based on clear  language or other strong evidence that Congress intended otherwise. 

    Can be applied in two circumstances: 

1) When a federal statute contains an express preemption provision (courts can construe the provision narrowly to preempt some state laws but not others),   

    If congress speaks clearly, then they can preempt a state statute, but 

language has to be clear. Where language is ambiguous, courts interpret it  narrowly.

2) And when it does not. 

The Presumption against Retroactivity: a statute operates retroactively if the new  provision attaches new legal consequences to events completed before its enactment. The court  has found that Congress has authorized retroactive effect only when the statutory language is “so clear that it could sustain only one interpretation”. 

∙   The court has treated the presumption against retroactivity as an exception to the general  principle that a court should apply the law in effect at the time of its decision. 

17

∙    Ex­ we are going to impose a fine on anyone who conducted the act before the statute  was enacted. If it did do damage and that damage continues to the date of enaction, then  they are fined. Can congress legislate penalties on ongoing effects of previous damages?  This is murkier. 

∙    Why do we need this maxim? Doesn’t the constitution prohibit ex post facto laws? Yes,  but the court has claimed that ex post facto ONLY applies to criminal activities, not civil proceedings. However, congress must still be express! 

∙    What about remedial purposes canon? Usually loses against preemption. 

The Presumption against Extraterritorial Application: applying this presumption,  the court has held that numerous statutes do not apply outside the territorial boundaries of the  US. It operates like the clear statement rule, essentially requiring Congress to make clear its  intention for a particular statute to have effect beyond the territorial borders of the US. 

∙    Ex­ they pass a statute against bribing public officials, which is applied with vigor in the  US. It became the norm for US corporations to bribe officials of other nations for certain  rights. Can they apply the US statute to the foreign officials? Not it it’s just a general  anti­bribery statute. It needs to be more clear and precise. If Congress wanted the statute  to apply to foreign powers, then they should have particularly stated their intention.  Unless congress is express, the statute will not be given international sweep.

Two interpretive principles:  

1)  Scrivener’s Errors: directs courts to correct legislative drafting mistakes, or so­called  scrivener’s errors. Courts will correct these to effectuate what congress really meant to  say or what otherwise makes sense of the statute. (A slip of the pen; mechanical error).

a. US v. Locke: act required land owners to file a claim on intention to hold the land  each year “prior to December 1st”. The appellees filed their notice ON December  31st, not prior. 

i. Can the statute be interpreted as allowing a Dec. 31st filing? No (harsh  result). This is not a scrivener’s errors case example.

2)  Absurd Results Doctrine: directs courts to avoid statutory interpretations that provide  absurd results. Courts apply this principle on the assumption that congress intends  statutes to have sensible effects or that statutes should have sensible effects, as a  normative matter.

a. An agency cannot invoke the doctrine to remedy absurdities of the agency’s own  making. When it is applied, it requires the courts to select the alternative statutory  construction that does the least violence to congress’s enacted text. 

18

b. The absurd results doctrine applies only when the absurdity in question is the  product of a statute’s unambiguous direction. When an interpretation of an  ambiguous text produces absurd results, then the court could simply go with the  other interpretation. 

c. Coalition for Responsibility Regulation of Industry v. EPA­ circuit upheld  doctrine of absurd results. Permitting a statute to be read to avoid absurd results  allows an agency to establish that seemingly clear statutory language does not  express the unambiguously expressed intent of Congress. However, the doctrine  of absurd results does not grant the agency a license to rewrite the statute. 

INTENT AND PURPOSE BASED TOOLS:

HIERARACHY OF LEGISLATIVE HISTORY

Parol Evidence Rule: when the document is clear or unambiguous, then you stick to the text  and do not use prior drafts. Compare parol evidence rule with our ability to use legislative  history. Always start with text. If there’s ambiguity, then look to all our canons. 

Is legislative history a supplemental tool? Some judges believe legislative history use is  inappropriate, all you need is the text. But some judges believe it can give us legislative purpose. 

What does it mean to say that a body with over 600 individuals has “intent”? It is a large group  that probably disagrees. So how do you determine what to give weight to? There is a hierarchy of legislative history. Different pieces of legislative history have different weights relative to one  another. These are the relative weight of the pieces on which courts most often rely: 

1)   Committee Reports: occupy the highest position in the hierarchy of legislative history.  Written by those who are charged with responsibility of the bill and who are best  informed about that bill. They circulate the bill to the whole chamber and are read by  legislative staff and member of congress. 

o   But are not always reliable because they are not subject to a vote by a full  chamber of congress and cannot be amended, so they do not reflect 

disagreements. 

o   The best committee report is the Conference Committee because it is the final  stage (the step after it becomes a law). Both houses are on the conference  committee, so it’s a larger group that should give you a more accurate view. Are  not as helpful because they only talk about what they disagree about. Usually  trumps the house and senate committee report.  

2)  Author or Sponsor Statements: reliable indication of legislative intent because it’s  prepared by an individual knowledgeable about the bill. Still is only one voice rather than the view of the whole chamber. 

19

3)  Member Statements: remarks of other members of congress may contain relevant  information. Losing side statement usually does not have much weight. 

4)  Hearing Records: committees that draft and debate bills in both the house and senate  frequently hold hearings on the bills. The record may include oral testimony, written  submissions of the report, as well as comments and questions from the members  themselves. But they are attended by just committee member, not the entire congress. 

5)  Other Legislative Statements: legislative history of other statutes, both from the past  and future, might serve as guides to the meaning of a word, provision, or the purpose of a statute, particularly if written close in time and treat the same subject. 

6)  Presidential and Agency Statements: president signed the bill into law, so is presumed  to have read the bill. In addition, the president may have participated in the drafting of the legislation and was advised as to the content of the bill. 

o   Why is he at the bottom? He’s an entirely separate branch and isn’t a part of  congress. He’s a necessary participant in passing a law, but doesn’t speak to  congressional intent. 

Judicial Reliance on Legislative History Cases:  

Moore v. Harris: facts­ Moore sought black lung benefits under a safety act. The secretary of  health denied his request because he had not been employed at the mine for 10 years (only 7).  However, he had been self­employed at his own mine, which when combined put him over the  10 year mark requirement. 

∙    Whether the statutory language allows the court to combine the time Moore spent in the  mines total ­Yes. 

o  “Miner” is an individual who was or is employed in a coal mine. Argument that  Congress didn’t intend there to be a clear distinction between self­employment  and being an employee. 

∙ What were the sources that the court looked to in this case? Statutory purpose: the statute  itself should say what its purpose is. Legislative History: alternated between “worked in”  and “employed in” in the senate committee report document. Looked at author statements and member statements. They used multiple sources to interpret the case. 

∙ This happened in 1972, but in 1978 the bill was amended and they changed the definition of miner. Under the new definition, it showed the intent of excluding self­employed  miners. 

o What does it mean when congress overrules what you said was the legal  principle? It probably means Congress thought the interpretation of the regulation  was wrong.

20

o What did the court say about the overruling? That the benefits were made clear  for all miners and that the statute was originally misinterpreted. Congress  misspoke when using the words interchangeably. 

Montana Wilderness Association v. US Forest Service: Facts­ Burlington wanted to build a road  across national forest land and US forest service granted them a permit. Burlington had a  property right to an area in the middle of the national forest and they wanted access to it  (landlocked). 

∙    The act in Alaska essentially protects this land, but if you build a road on it, you lose the  ability to protect that land. Does the federal statute apply to just Alaska or the entire US?  The court determines the provisions apply only to Alaska. 

o In pari materia­ if the two provisions are side by side, they’re meant to have the  same effect. Use of the words is meant to have a consistent meaning. “National  forest”. 

∙ Second Decision for the same case­ Court basically ended up reversing its decision and  withdrew it. Why 180 degree turn around? Subsequent act passed in the same congress  and did not contain national access language. So, they thought it should apply nationally. 

TOOLS FOR CHANGED CIRCUMSTANCES: 

DYNAMIC INTERPRETATION

Whenever a statute or law is “dynamic” it must be allowed to evolve as the courts change in economic knowledge and circumstances change. It is whenever parts of the legislation are open to interpretation; it is a flexible standard that is not based on strict Textualism, but able to change based on current court interpretation. Dynamic interpretation is also founded on the idea that the original legislative expectations should not always control statutory meaning. This is especially true when the statute is old and generally phrased and the societal or legal context of the statute has changed in material ways. 

Archaeological v. Nautical Interpretation:  

∙    Archaeological­ the meaning of a statute is set in stone on the date of its enactment, and  it is the interpreter’s task to uncover and reconstruct that original meaning. 

∙    Nautical­ understands a statute as an on­going process. Willingness to test the mores of  today. Non­originalism; Operating within the statute and interpreting it. Interpreters are  creators of meaning. 

o    Nautical interpretation is still text­based. 

Bob Jones University v. US: famous illustration of how courts will look to how history and  modern conditions have changed. School had discriminatory practices, so the IRS did not give 

21

them tax­exempt status. An overtly racist institution is also a university, so are they entitled to  tax exemption? No. 

Background: 501(c)(3) exempts institutions from taxes and IRS code sec 170 allows persons to  deduct certain “charitable contributions”. 501 does not include the word “charity” or mention  public policy. 

∙ These institutions did not meet the requirement by providing "beneficial and stabilizing  influences in community life" to be supported by taxpayers with a special tax status. The schools could not meet this requirement due to their discriminatory policies. The Court  declared that racial discrimination in education violated a "fundamental national public  policy."

∙ The government may justify a limitation on religious liberties by showing it is necessary  to accomplish an "overriding governmental interest." Prohibiting racial discrimination  was such a governmental interest. Hence, the Court found that "not all burdens on  religion are unconstitutional."

∙ Agency deference present: IRS was given the power to change their regulation and  update and adapt them to historical circumstance.

Tools that Justice Burger used to prove that the University should not be tax­exempt:  

∙    Plain Language: “prevention of cruelty to children”, “no attempting to influence  legislation”. 

∙    Congressional Purpose

o   In pari materia­ 170 parallels 501. Charitable contributions is not a blank slate or  a neutral term. Common Law: Concept of charitable contribution harkens back to  charitable institutions which was not dealing with tax law, but rather trusts.  Congress intentionally used a dynamic term (not meant to be fixed at one time,  but to grow with the times). “Charitable” also means it benefits society at large  and serves a desirable public purpose.  

o    What the other branches are doing in regards to this issue: there was broad  consensus among the federal branches. Numerous executive orders and 

fundamental policy of eliminating racial discrimination. 

o    Common law  dynamic language.  

Why not let congress fix it by changing the statute? 

∙    Burger said Congress’ failure to act indicated support for the IRS interpretation/change.  Congressional Inaction acquiesces with the IRS rulings. Also, bills to overturn the IRS 

22

interpretation never got past committee. Congress chose not to overrule the IRS  determination. 

∙    “Social Clubs”­ congress will not grant tax exempt status to others that are  discriminatory (golf clubs, Country clubs?). Determined that we should not use tax  benefits to support racism. Exclusio Unis: congress could have included other  organizations as well (universities), but didn’t. They meant what they didn’t say. (Since  universities were not explicitly excluded, maybe Bob Jones should have been tax  exempt). 

Rehnquist Dissent: they should be tax exempt­ he was concerned with the court legislating,  rather than interpreting. Congress could have narrowed the exclusions, like they did with social  clubs, but chose not to. The court should not tweak what Congress says. 

Leegin Creative Leather Products v. PSKS: Facts­ Leegin entered into vertical price fixing with  their retailers, requiring them to charge no less than certain minimum prices for their products.  PSKS sold the products at a discount and was dropped as a retailer, suffering losses. 

∙    PSKS argued from precedent­ mandatory minimum price agreements are per se illegal (the action without consideration for circumstance is illegal).

∙    Leegin argued for the Rule of Reason: only combinations and contracts unreasonably  restraining trade are subject to actions under the anti­trust laws. Possession of monopoly  power is not in itself illegal. Under the rule of reason, the circumstances in which the  action was committed must be considered. Price minimums would be held illegal only  where they are shown to be anticompetitive (case by case basis).  

∙    HELD­ Court determined that precedent should be overruled and vertical price  minimums are to be judged by the rule of reason. 

o Justice Kennedy focused on two things: 1) the Sherman act is different because  it’s a dynamic common law statute (def above). Parts of legislation are left  open. 2) To what extent the act allows per se action, case by case interpretation  is better. 

AGENCIES

What provisions of the US Constitution discuss the control or administration of federal  department or agencies? 

­ Article II­ presidential executive powers. Vests the power to execute the instructions of  Congress, which has the exclusive power to make laws. 

­ The Necessary and Proper Clause (Article I, Sec 8, Cl 18): “The Congress shall have  Power ... To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into 

23

Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the  Government of the United States, or in any Department or Officer thereof.”

What is an Agency? A unit of government created by statute. Owes its existence, form, and  power to legislation. Federal agencies are established through federal legislation, but there can  also be state agencies. Agencies are not described in the constitution. Mentions “executive  departments”, which suggests they are under the president’s control. Agencies are not  “unconstitutional” simply because they are “extra­constitutional”.

(Ex­ Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Security, FEMA). 

What federal agency was not created by statute? The EPA was created by an executive order  (Nixon). Agencies can also include courts. Under a strict reading, the EPA is not an agency  because it was not created by statute. 

What are the benefits of agencies?  

∙    Expertise: seen as having expertise for solving the complex problems that confront  modern society. 

∙    Fairness and Rationality: guidance material, judicial review, and administrative  procedure. 

∙    Interest Representation: can enhance legitimacy through the legislative process. 

∙    Political Accountability: agencies can be seen as being accountable to the people,  indirectly, because the president monitors their actions. 

∙    Efficacy and Flexibility: capacity to respond quickly to changing circumstances. ∙    Coordination: coordinating policies with other agencies across government  ∙    Efficiency: regulations. 

What does an agency do (sphere of power)? 

Everything from education to regulations. There are probably 10 times as many regulations as  there are laws. Scope of activities are enormous. Ex­ issue guidance, investing (making decisions that can affect the economy), usually agencies have to step in and deal with problems first before congress will speak to the issue. 

“Notice and Comment” Rule Making: the way agencies open the door for making the  rules; it is a predictable process for issuing regulations. Anybody can comment on a rule that’s  been published in the federal registry. You don’t need standing, you just have to be capable of  writing a comment. The agency will respond to substantive comments. Actions of agencies can  be reviewed by federal courts under a substantive standard­ arbitrary and capricious review (the 

24

agency can get it wrong, but the court will not overturn the decision unless its sooo wrong). The  courts looks at comments and the record, don’t call witnesses. 

Process: 

1.   Agency issues a notice of proposed rulemaking, which contains one or more proposed  rules and is published in the federal register. 

2.   Provide a reasonable time for interested parties to submit written comments on the  proposed rule. Meant to replace an oral, trial­type hearing with a written one. 

3.   Agency completes the notice­and­comment rulemaking process by issuing a final rule.  The statement of “basis and purpose” must, at a minimum, set forth the rationale and  legal authority for the rule. 

If you have a particular statute, usually congress can have its own specific review standard for  that statute written into the provision. 

Who calls the shots? 

Organizations like agencies are usually not simple and have many layers of management.  Depends on what type of agency it is, Executive­Branch or Independent Agencies:

o    Executive Branch Agencies appear under the president in the governmental  organizational chart and are run by officials who can be fired at will by the President.  (Ex­ FEMA, EPA, Dept. of the interior, Dept. of Health).

o    Independent Agencies are different because their heads (can be several) serve fixed  terms that expire in staggered years and are removable by the president only “for  cause” or “good cause”. They are independent in the sense that their heads are not  subject to plenary presidential removal. Also, they are generally run by multi­member  commissions or boards rather than a single administrator. (Ex­ SEC, FCC, Federal  Reserve). 

∙   Why would you want an independent agency? More immune from political  pressure. 

∙    The Constitutionality of Independent Agencies: independent agencies  cannot be plausibly located in either the legislative or judicial branch because  they are more like the executive branch. (The problem is that the leaders are  not removable by the president at will, which led them to be called “the 

headless fourth branch” of our government”.) Separation of powers issue.  Agencies have both: 

    Civil Service Members: hired through a non­political process. More than 2 million, so  they greatly outnumber political appointees and outlast them.  

25

    Political Appointees: constitution requires some high­level officials to be appointed by  the President and confirmed by the senate. They occupy the top rung of leadership and  management within an agency and can dramatically shape the direction of the agency.  Serve at the pleasure of the executive branch. 

Free Enterprise Fund v. Public Company Accounting Oversight Board: P brought suit alleging  that the creation of the board violated the appointments clause because it derived the President  from exercising adequate control over the board (President could not directly fire board members and SEC could only fire the board members “for­cause”). 

∙   Violated the separation of powers­ congress could create the agency, but the executive  could not control or regulate it. Contradicts article II’s vesting of the executive power in  the president. Congress is taking power from Executive and giving it to an agency neither of them have control of. 

∙    Court rules this was an over delegation of power by Congress to the agency. SC struck  down an act of congress. 

∙    Take­away: focus on who calls the shots in an agency and the limits on congress’ ability  to insulate and protect the individuals who make those calls.

DELEGATION

Can you have a contract that is too vague to be enforced? 

Ex­ “anyone who restrains trade shall be liable for triple the damages caused by their  conduct”. Is this enough? Sometimes legislatures purposefully make broad rules/statutes and rely on agencies to interpret them according to the situation. Could a court hear a case relying only on this statute? Yes, it’s powerful to whoever can enforce it. Who can enforce it? FTC (federal trade commission), DOJ (department of justice). Basically, it lets the court fill in the blanks. By  leaving it broad and open, the legislature is delegating interpretation to whoever gets the case. 

What would lead congress to be specific or vague in some cases?  

∙    Perhaps don’t have the knowledge, time, or resources to be specific. (Ignorance of the  topic). 

∙    Claim benefit and not the cost (political self­interest), creating loop holes ∙    Distrust or shared delegation

(CONS): When Congress foregoes specificity, the result is a delegation of authority, but not  every delegation is explicit in the statute. What’s the cost of letting congress pass the ball?  Possible lack of accountability, vagueness used more often as a legislative tool is undemocratic.  The constitutional argument against delegation is that Congress is vested with legislative power  and cannot delegate that power to other institutions. 

26

Non­delegation doctrine: is the principle that the Congress of the United States, being  vested with "all legislative powers" by Article One, Section 1 of the United States Constitution,  cannot delegate that power to anyone else; there is a rule against laws that are too vague. Gives  limits as to how far congress can go in not being specific. 

∙ However, the Supreme Court has ruled that Congressional delegation of legislative  authority is an implied power of Congress that is constitutional so long as Congress  provides an "intelligible principle" to guide the executive branch

An “intelligible principle” is language in an operative provision of a statute that provides the  agency some guidance on its mission. 

∙ As between specificity and delegation, Congress frequently chooses delegation. The  Court has gone out of its way to uphold broad delegating statutes as long as they contain  an “intelligible principle” to constrain the agency. 

The Rule of Law Rationale: a system of objective and accessible commands, law which can be  seen to flow from collective agreement rather than from the exercise of discretion or preference  by those persons who happen to be in the positions of authority. The rule of law requires the  government to exercise its power in accordance with well­established and clearly written rules,  regulations, and legal principles.

Conditions where Congress will likely provide a greater degree of delegation to an executive  agency:  

­ controversial areas, 

­ when there’s more trust of delegating to others,

­ more complex and detailed it is the more willing congress is to let agencies run it,  ­ if the agency has more time and resources to commit to a certain problem,  ­ requires a lot of technical expertise to understand it. 

TOOLS OF STATUTORY IMPLEMENTATION

STEPS FOR RULE MAKING:  

Semi Annual Index­ purgatory; where the rule sits before it actually gets passed.  ANPR­ announced notice of proposed rule making 

NPR­ notice of proposed rulemaking (where the lawyer jumps in for the client and where  the agency takes comments­ if you don’t comment in the time frame, you lose your vote).

Data Availability­ library where you can go look at the documents 

27

SNPR­ supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking. (Gives fair notice of changes before publishing.)

Final­ where the record is set.

     **Texas also has administrative procedure with the same elements. One major difference:  Contested Case Hearing­ where you can request a court proceeding if you want to fight a  certain rule or decision. 

NHTSA example­ gov wanted car companies to improve gas mileage. Retroactivity deprived the  law of its statutory intent. Courts will assume things should not be dealt with retroactively unless the statute explicitly provided for it. 

How do agencies interpret statutes? 

Factors that agencies consider: 

∙    Statutory: the agency considers the authority that the statute grants and the instructions  that it provides to determine what actions are required and permitted; it often interprets  the language of its statute before applying that language, just as courts do. 

∙    Scientific: it examines the scientific data that the problem requires; it examines the  existing and potential technology for responding to risks. 

∙    Economic: it assesses the costs in relation to the benefits of different alternatives. 

∙    Political: considers other important aspects of the problem, like public attitudes and  political preferences, federal regulation, especially burdens on the domestic auto industry.

Note­ that all agencies do not perform all of these analyses for every regulation. 

Note­ that agencies must find a way to integrate these tools when making a decision. Regulations reflect all things considered judgments, not a series of isolated considerations. 

Statutory Analysis­ an agency must ensure that its regulations are a) within the scope of its  statute and b) consistent with the terms of its statute. 

o   1) Jurisdiction­ does this statute authorize this agency to reach a particular subject? 

o   Even if an agency has jurisdiction over a particular subject, it may only regulate that  subject in the manner the statute permits. 2) An agency may not rely on prohibited or  irrelevant statutory factors and it must consider mandatory or relevant statutory factors. 

Chevron USA Inc v. Natural Resources Defense Council Inc: landmark case that advocated  giving agencies deference for their reasonable policy­making decisions. 

28

∙    Background: Any major facility emits air pollutants in multiple places and ways. How do  you control the safety of these emissions? Clean Air Act required each area to have its  own permits (old school). New school­ didn’t view it as a bunch of emitters, but as one  big one which only needed one permit (the bubble). You had flexibility to lower and raise each emitter as long as you didn’t raise the collective level of pollution. This was a  radical departure from the way the clean air act had been understood before. EPA  allowed bubbling in this case. 

o   SC looked to: statutory language, ambiguous/absent congressional intent, silent  legislative history, flexibility of the legislation, and policy considerations (which  they said were for congress, not courts). Why congress was ambiguous does not  matter; all that matters is that power and authority was delegated to the agency. 

∙    STEP 1­ question whether congress has directly spoken to the precise question at  issue. (EPA’s authority to treat all pollution­emitting devices within the same industry  grouping as though within a single “bubble” based on the construction of the statutory  term “stationary source”). If it’s clear, then that’s the end of the matter. 

∙    STEP 2­ But if congress has not directly addressed the question, the court does not  simply impose its own construction on the statute, as would be necessary in the absence  of an administrative interpretation. (Deference to agencies where congress is silent or  ambiguous­ even where the court disagrees). 

o    The question for the court is whether the agency’s answer is based on a  permissible construction of the statute. 

o    Implicitly or explicitly delegate by Congress: if congress has explicitly left a gap for the agency to fill, there is an express delegation of authority to the agency to  elucidate a specific provision of the statute by regulation. Where it is implicit, a  court may not substitute its own construction of a statutory provision for a  reasonable interpretation made by the administrator of an agency. 

o    If an agency has adopted a regulation based on an interpretation of a statute  under step two of the chevron analysis, a federal court will overturn that  

interpretation if: congress improperly delegated legislative powers under article I  by allowing agency to implement the statute without an intelligible principle or if  agency’s regulation is arbitrary, capricious, or manifestly contrary to the purpose.

∙    PSD (prevention of significant deterioration­ where the air is clean and they’re trying to  keep it that way) or NSR (new source review­ use where the air is already dirty). NSR  requirements are more stringent. 

Assumptions with the chevron test­ what if an agency has to interpret a constitutional  requirement if it’s part of a regulatory framework (is there any deference given by the court?)

29

∙    No. The court would say that constitutional issues are their call and congress cannot give  that power to agencies. 

Does it have to be a regulation/rule; What about a circular or pamphlet (would a court give  informal lower tier deference)? 

∙    Court would defer only based on how much it looks like a regulation. MEAD AGENCIES AND ECONOMICS

The way a rule is conceived and grows inside the confines of the agency; how the agency thinks.  Agencies anticipate how others will respond. 

Tools Agencies Rely on: Economic, Political, and Scientific

∙    Most important fundamental tool is the Cost­Benefit Analysis. This is a decision  procedure, not a moral standard. It is a way of producing a full accounting; has spurred  governmental attention in serious problems and has led to regulations that accomplish  statutory goals at lower costs, or that do not devote limited private and public resources to areas where they are unlikely to do much good. What effect does this have on human  life? Do the number of lives saved justify the costs? 

∙    CBA­ Looks at the overall societal benefit of a rule (measure the statistical difference  between benefits and costs of a project).  Costs to the community of projects to establish  whether they are worthwhile. It is the regulatory engine; CBA is the dominant paradigm  that agencies use to determine economic outcome of rules. 

∙    Time is a factor­ Must discount the money you get now by what inflation will be in the  future. Money is worth more now than it is 10 years from now. What type of rule is most  likely to be effected (disfavorly skewed) by a high discount rate? A rule that takes  immediate effect, rules with uncertainty that are hard to give a number to­ hard to see the  benefits of environmental regulations (how much is clean air worth?), a rule where you  have to place a monetary value on something that has a moral component. 

∙    It is not required for an agency to consider “willingness to pay” methodology to  determine the value of a lost human life. 

OMB A4: what agencies have to look at when they are devising a rule and have to justify its  existence. Still have to list things that are not able to be monetized (separate list). This analysis  document should discuss the expected benefits and costs of the selected regulatory option and  any reasonable alternatives. 

∙    Ex­ Noah Act: 

30

o Schedule 1 (costs): federal funding and cost for the scientific research and  devices, implementation costs (permits and licensing­ agency costs), field tests  (what happens when you let the reintroduced animals back into the ecosystem), 

o Schedule 2 (benefits): estimated benefits in advances in technology and creation,  value of the animals, 

o Schedule 3 (moral issues). 

AGENCIES AND SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS

Scientific method/systematic approach (observable and testable­ controlled experiments), then  falsifiable­ possible to be disproven. Expecting to see transparency and peer review.   

Scientific tools that agencies use: 

1)   Risk Assessment: process for calculating probability and magnitude of negative effects.  (Ex­ crash test). Simply says what the risk is and what do we need to know about it. Ex­  public health and toxicology­ How it operates/byproducts. Risk Management­ decision  to take or withhold action. This is more policy and judgment based on the research done  in the risk assessment. Cost on society. 

a. Risk assessment and risk management is a two­step process which carries  different values.

b. Where are the flaws in risk? When there’s uncertainty (problem can’t be defined  or scientific analysis is imprecise or can change in the future/ there isn’t a single  answer) or ignorance (it might be there, but we don’t have all the data right now).

2)   Toxicology­ rat testing; biological hazard of a particular chemical or compound. Study of poisons, but isn’t positively accurate because they can’t test on humans and there can be  intervening causes. There are extrapolation issues. 

3)   Epidemiology­ looks at exposure in the field and then extrapolates from the exposure  where the effects are coming from. Trying to find correlation that is a reliable link.  Fundamental issues­ just because two things are close doesn’t mean one thing caused the  other. But it is a strong clue. 

4)   Statistical Analysis­ fastest growing tool; big data. A way to determine causal  relationships between two subsets within data. 

Potential way to solve problems:  

1)   Precautionary Approach­ playing it safe/rather safe than sorry. If the toxicology is  questionable, then take the bottom, the number you know will be protected. The blow 

31

back from this approach is that it can be really expensive or some things don’t have solid  data, so you can’t implement the policy. Safety factors can be wildly unrealistic and you  end up chasing phantom risks. 

a.   Ex­ children eating lead tainted soil 24 hours a day­ unrealistic test which leads to overprotection. They know there’s a risk, but it’s fuzzy and there’s a range, so  they pick the low end. 

b.   Review Question: Ex. of agency’s application of a precautionary approach when  generating scientific information in a risk assessment: the agency “stacks” risks by assuming the most conservative risk level for each step of a course of action,  so that the resulting overall risk (of exposure) is set at an extremely low level. 

2)   Open Ended Science­ if you’re trying to be precautionary, you can end up with rule  making proceedings that can last a long time. 

3)   Shifting Standard Science­ if something takes a long time, then the agency can  constantly change and build the science. The hamster wheel never stops (air condition  and changes in Houston). 

4)   Political Science­ selectively using science to support a political goal. Usually does not  contain the hall marks of falsifiability or peer review. 

Can Congress come in and tell agencies they have to use a specific scientific approach?  

∙    Nuclear Waste Act­ EPA had to do an assessment of the risk in where to put the waste.  EPA said 10,000 years is enough (use this number a lot) because the models they used  weren’t certain. Other agency said it had to be a million years (congress tried to tell the  EPA how to use the science). Congress can put their hands on the process. 

∙    What did the DC Circuit say in response to EPA’s decision? Rejected EPA’s choice  because congress can tell an agency how to get and account for the information and  opinion of the other agency. Court deemed that EPA failed to give due weight to the  other conclusion by the National Academy of Science that was required by congress. 

What did Obama’s 2009 memorandum on scientific integrity direct heads of executive  department and agencies to do? 1) Use scientific information in policy decisions subject to well established scientific processes, including peer review where appropriate. 2) Unless otherwise  restricted, make scientific findings available to the public. 

The Scientific Charade:  

Involves Agency Scientists (scientists fail to draw the line between science and policy,  either inadvertently or deliberately):

32

∙    Unintentional Charade­ agencies set a single, quantitative standard (usually they  continue indefinitely to look to science to resolve the trans­scientific questions).  Endless search for nonexistent scientific answers. Where bureaucrats inadvertently  characterize the standard­setting task as a problem for science. 

∙    Intentional Charade­ agency bureaucrats consciously disguise policy choices as  science. Typically occurs only after agency scientists have begun developing a  standard. 

      Involves agency political appointees (or officials within the white house):

∙    Premeditated Charade­ final agency approach to standard setting is to make a specific  policy choice, whether it is pro­industry or favors overprotection of public health and  the environment, and to introduce science only after the fact in order to  scientifically justify the predetermined standard.  

AGENCIES AND POLITICAL ANALYSIS

­     Public attitudes, distributional effects, and political preferences all fall into this category. 

­     Agencies consider how the public will react to a regulation and whom a regulation is likely to  effect. Fairness Concerns. 

­     Preferences of current officials are considered­ like the president and congress. 

­     Scientific or economic grounds for a decision are much more likely to be upheld than    political reasons. Try to leave political reasons out of the carving of the regulation and have  people bring them up later so you can turn them down. 

How the agency actually implements rules­ 1) formal adjudication, 2) comment­and­notice  rulemaking, and 3) guidance. 

(1) Formal Adjudication­ making a rule by trial; contested proceeding. Parties have a right to  present their position by oral or documentary evidence. Expert testimony may be used. Rules of  evidence do not apply, but can be used as a guideline. You can appeal within the agency (to the  head of the agency or an intermediate appeals board).

∙    In a formal adjudication to implement a statute, an agency: 1) must allow a party to  cross­examine witnesses as required for a full and true disclosure of facts, 2) typically will provide an administrative law judge to preside over an initial hearing, and 3)  must provide a statement of findings and conclusions along with the reason for the  decision.    

∙    Some consider formal adjudication as inferior to notice­and­comment rule making  because it is routinely retroactive (applying the new rule to the parties in the case)  and has fewer opportunities for public participation. The agency still decides in 

33

notice­and­comment (they don’t have to follow recommendations). Adjudicatory  action binds the agency. But with adjudication you can present your case and  reasoning before an impartial judge and not have to deal with delay tactics. 

∙    Ex­ Boston Medical Center Formal Adjudication­ looks at precedent, legislative  history, intention of the act, plain meaning of the statute, reasons why the students  should be considered employees, additional statute support­ def. of employee, current  trend, and canon of retroactivity. 

(2) Look to page 23 for notice and comment. 

(3) Guidance­ where most of the action is today! Less formal than adjudication or notice­and comment rulemaking. 

∙ Interpretive rules, statements of policy, and rules of “agency organization, procedure, or  practice”, are generally referred to as forms of guidance. They are expressly exempt from the requirements of notice­and­comment rule making. An agency may use such  documents to indicate how it will implement a particular statutory or regulatory regime.

o This is where agencies enforce, penalize, and interpret their regulations. Ex­  enforcement handbooks and manuals. 

∙ When an agency issues a guidance document that interprets a regulation or statute:  

o The guidance typically cannot be subjected to judicial review under the  Administrative procedure act. 

o The agency may choose to open the guidance to public notice in the federal  register. 

o That guidance may be judicially reversed if it imposes substantive obligations  without proper notice and comment. 

o The agency may explicitly state that the guidance does not bind the agency or any related entity. 

 Many guidance documents (like the ones issued by the EPA) have claimed that they are not binding on regulated entities and disclaims any legal 

effects and reserves an agency’s discretion to deviate from guidance  

terms. So, people that don’t like it can’t sue. 

Why would an agency prefer using guidance documents to notice­and­comment procedure?  ∙   Flexibility to change the guidance inexpensively and quickly. 

∙   Hope to forestall expensive litigation over the policy’s validity. 

∙   Less likely to be subject to congressional oversight or attention in the media.  34

∙   “Compliance for less”­ agency can obtain a rule­like effect while minimizing political  oversight and avoiding procedural discipline, public participation, and judicial  accountability. 

∙   Neg. ­ the agency will not receive useful information from previously unknown  sources, and its decision will not be subjected to the discipline of having to respond to comments received. 

∙   Neg. ­ guidance documents receive very limited review from congress and the white  house. 

When Guidance goes too far:  

Suppose a guidance is written that imposes substantive things people have to comply with? This can become a rule whether they call it a rule or not. Then people can sue. When agencies try to  put flesh on the bones of guidance, they can go too far and imply a rule without complying with  procedural rule making.

Suppose there is a guidance with references to existing laws and what to do with them­ is it a  regulation or a law? 

­ Usually a guidance can refer to existing laws and how to implement them (in fact, that’s  a primary purpose for most guidances).  The courts will strike down a guidance as an  impermissible attempt at “backdoor regulation”, however, if the guidance specifies and  fixes legal obligations and rights in the same fashion as a regulation.  

­ If an agency goes too far with its guidance, the court will usually deem it an attempt to  promulgate a regulation without proper notice­and­comment rulemaking, and it will  remand the guidance to the agency for further development or clarification.

OUTSIDE CONTROL OF AGENCY ACTION: PRESIDENTIAL

The President “shall take care that the laws be faithfully executed”. i.e. The President asserts control of agency action as he or she deems necessary to ensure that such action is consistent with overall government priorities and popular preferences. (Art. III, sec. 3, cl. 3)

What are the effects of presidential control?  

∙ May enhance the accountability of agency action. 

∙ Voters can hold the president responsible for agency actions that they dislike. 

∙ Presidential control may improve efficacy of agency action. President can coordinate the  actions of agencies across the government, avoiding redundant or conflicting regulations. 

35

∙ The president may improve efficiency of agency action. Can spur sluggish agencies into  action or require agencies to consider factors that they may have neglected to misapplied, including costs and benefits of proposed regulations. 

∙ Neg.­ if the president seeks to influence agency action in a way that contravenes  scientific finding or statutory consideration. It can decrease the expertise and even the  legality of the agency action.

When the President seeks control of agency action, he can make a request that an agency  voluntarily take a particular action through informal, non­public means or can take the formal,  visible, and effective step of 1) replacing agency officials with individuals more amenable to  administration views or 2) withhold funding until the agency changes course. The president  could also 3) set up an entire process for requiring agencies to submit their proposed regulations  to the white house for review under specific principles.

TOOLS of the President­  

1) Control of Agency Personnel (hiring and firing authority): power to appoint and fire  heads of agencies. If the president first appoints people that coincide with his views, then  he won’t need to get rid of them later. To remove such leaders draws considerable  attention and creates the need for a replacement acceptable to senate. 

2) Control of Appropriations (budgeting process): to control agency funding. The  president can recommend budget cuts for agencies that fail to follow administration  preferences (or budget increase for those who comply). Line item veto was deemed  unconstitutional though in Clinton v. City of New York. 

3) Regulatory Planning and Review: under executive order 12,866. 

∙ Federal agencies should promulgate regulations that are necessary as required by  law, to interpret the law, or by compelling public need. Costs and benefits will be  provided in both quantitative and qualitative forms. In choosing among alternative regulatory approaches, agencies should select those that maximize net benefit  (look at scientific, technical, or economic decisions). Avoid regulations 

inconsistent, incompatible, or duplicative with its other regulations. 

∙ Each agency has to submit to OIRA a program, consistent with its resources and  regulatory priorities, under which the agency will periodically review its existing  significant regulations to determine whether any such regulations should be  modified or eliminated so as to make the agency’s regulatory program more  effective in achieving regulatory objectives.  

∙ Which of the following agencies must participate in the regulatory planning  process under executive order 12,866? 

36

i. US environmental protection agency, the Federal Reserve board, and the  US department of health and human services. 

ii. The review process is just the US EPA and dept. of Health and Human  Services. 

∙ Executive Order 12,866 does NOT apply to a regulatory action that is not  “major” as defined by EO 12,866 or any rule pertaining to military or foreign  affair functions of the US. 

Prompt v. Return:  

To communicate preference in response to information learned about planned or proposed  regulations, OIRA can issue “return letters” and “prompt letters”. Return letters remit proposed  regulations to the agency that produced them for reconsideration, providing an explanation of the deficiencies and suggestions for further development. Prompt letters address an agency’s plans  or priorities for a given year. 

4) Presidential Directive­ can assert control of agency action by issuing pre­regulatory  directives in the form of official memorandum to executive branch agency heads. This  instructs an agency to take a particular action under its existing regulatory authority. They are different than prompt letters because they are signed by the president. 

­ Presidential Directive typically orders agencies to instigate work that they  otherwise would not have begun.  For example, President Obama in 2013  directed several federal agencies to take specific steps to address climate  change, but most of those steps led to future regulatory action rather than an  immediate and direct change in any particular agency’s rules.  

OUTSIDE CONTROL OF AGENCY ACTION: CONGRESSIONAL

Congress agreed to give the power away to the agency in the first place, but still seeks control  over the agency. The impulse to delegate does not negate the impulse to control. 

What can Congress do to control agencies?  

1) New Legislation­ congress can enact new legislation which might abolish an agency or  restrict its authority; they can pass new legislation to restrict or bar agency’s future  actions. 

∙ Congress can assert control of agency action by simply threatening to restrict an  agency’s authority or reverse an agency’s rule. 

2) Appropriations­ enables congress to assert continuous control of agency action by  restricting or cutting their money. Can withhold funding for specific agency activity in an appropriations bill. 

37

∙ Has caused immeasurable mischief (anti deficiency act­ can’t pre­commit the  government to spend money; prohibits an agency from incurring contractual  commitments beyond the current fiscal year,). Appropriations bills do more than  just give money; they can also give congress a platform to exercise extreme  control. Language counts, language can express the desire of the committee, while not giving a specific amount. 

3) Oversight Hearings­ congress can use oversight hearings to uncover facts in aid of  further legislative activity. Can function as an information tool. Can hold the agency  officials accountable. Used to investigate agency implementation of a statutory program. 

∙ However, the oversights, even if well intentioned, divert agency resources from  their intended purposes. 

4) Fire Alarms: tools that position constituents to monitor agency action and alert congress  when legislative intervention is necessary. Tool for this­ Notice and Comment­ if the  agency is doing something really stupid, then people send up a flare 

5) FOIA­ freedom of information act­ open to everyone. Information that an agency has  shall be made available upon request, subject to some restrictions. 

6) Citizen Suits­ statutory vehicle which allows a private citizen to bring an action/law suit  as if they were the US gov. It authorize any person to seek judicial review of agency  action. In these ways, citizen suit provisions shift monitoring costs to citizens and to the  courts. 

a. Congress can create a new cause of action to allow persons injured by an agency’s actions to sue that agency for failure to comply with mandatory statutory duties  (citizen suits).

What are the limits? How far can Congress go? Tools that Congress cannot use today:  

∙ Negative Form of Legislative Veto is unconstitutional­ the negative form has the effect  of reversing an agency decision, whereas the positive veto requires an agency to obtain  legislative approval before a decision becomes effective. 

Bowsher v. Synar: dealt with separation of powers in regards to control of the comptroller  general position. Whether congress had complete control to fire the comptroller whenever his job fell within executive parameters (even though he was not technically a part of the executive  branch). Court ruled congress could not dictate how executive operated by having power over  the comptroller general, even though he fell under the legislative branch. 

∙ Main point­ it doesn’t matter what you call it or who created it, but it matters what job  they do and what duties they have.

38

∙ Take­Away: congress’ actions were unconstitutional because it imposed upon the  executive branch and violated the separation of powers.

∙ Ended up overturning the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985  [Gramm­Rudman­Hollings]. Is there a way to revise the act so as not to violate the  separation of powers? Reassign the comptroller to fall solely within one branch… separation of powers is not unsurmountable.

∙ How did these guys have standing to overturn the budget act?  Article 3 act for standing. 

Congressional Review Act­ requires both independent and executive branch agencies to  submit “major” rules, as well as other information including any cost­benefit analysis of the rule, to congress and the general accounting office before the rule may take effect. Essentially takes  “new laws” and makes it easier for congress to pass a law. 

∙ All congress has to do is pass a joint resolution disapproving the new regulation.  Bypasses filibuster and is on an expedited process. Congress can have a resolution passed with as little as 30 senators and put on the calendar. Still has to be signed by the  president. Has only been invoked 1 time!

∙ A joint resolution can revoke an agency action upon passage in both chambers of  congress and approval by president (or veto override).

∙ A joint resolution is not subjected to the traditional rules of cloture in case of  filibuster in the Senate. 

The REINS Act­ being introduced this session. A congressional review act on steroids. Flips the presumption­ any major rule that impacts over 100 million dollars will not take effect until  congress expressly approves it through joint resolution. If congress does not endorse it, then the  rule dies. 

∙ One big problem­ who has to sign it once congress passes it? The president.  OUTSIDE CONTROL OF AGENCY ACTION: JUDICIARY If the court finds the agency has overstepped, what are its options? 

∙ Strike down the rule.

∙ Remand the rule for modification.

∙ Can enjoin the activity that’s taking place under the current rule. 

∙ Court can dictate regulatory action, but it is a fairly limited power considered in light of  what congress can do. 

39

Everything depends on the administrative procedure act (701, 702, 704). However, not only the  APA will apply. There are usually different standards of review and administrative procedures  located in other statutes. So, look at all of them. 

Four Gateways to getting into court (judicial review):  

1. Article III STANDING: Bars courts from hearing cases at the behest of certain plaintiffs.  Limits which plaintiffs can challenge agency action. Limits the opportunity for judicial review.  Generally, a private plaintiff alleging a “procedural injury” has to demonstrate their specific or  individual standing to seek judicial review in federal court. 

a) Injury in Fact: has to be particularized and concrete, not conjectural or hypothetical.  b) Actual and imminent: causation; fairly traceable to the action of the D. 

c) Redressability: it must be likely that this injury will be redressed by a favorable  decision.

How does this apply when you’re dealing with a regulatory issue (ex­ agency failed to comply  with law)? 

Massachusetts v. EPA (US SC, 2007): whether Mass. has standing to sue the EPA for not  enforcing the clean air act. Mass. wants to sue to make EPA take action. 

∙ Court rules yes for Massachusetts’s standing because of the state’s sovereign interests.  Also, its special role under the Clean Air Act as a state, merited special solicitude from  the federal courts. However, the court did not find that the private land owners had  standing to pursue their claims against EPA. 

o The supreme court held that a litigant with a procedural right, such as  Massachusetts, has standing if there is some possibility that the requested relief  will prompt the agency to reconsider its decision. 

∙ 1) Injury­ danger due to the possible issue of global warming, losing coastal land. States  have a special interest to sue for things like erosion of coast line over time (quasi sovereign interest). 

o How is a procedural injury different from the traditional injury? How are you hurt from an agency not enforcing the rules? Doesn’t just apply to states, but to  everyone. There is a lower standard; there are certain things you don’t have to  show. Redressability is already built into the injury. They also don’t have to prove traceability because the injury is by definition traceable to the action (already built into the procedural injury).

∙ 2) Causation­ global warming shown as a cause of the water rising. 

40

∙ 3) Redressability­ If the EPA regulates emissions from cars, it will help the issue of  global warming in Mass. 

What would have happened if this was not in Massachusetts, but a tribe of Inuits in Alaska  (sovereign under US law) losing the land they’re living on? They had standing (but lost for other  reasons), but the court struck down City of NY. 

2. REVIEWABILITY: bars courts from hearing certain claims. Congress may preclude judicial  review through statute and APA precludes review where the “agency is firmly committed to  agency discretion by law.” 

Heckler v. Chaney: Prisoners sentenced to execution challenged the drugs being used for their  execution under FDCA. The drugs had never been approved for use in human executions. FDA  denied enforcement, so they inmates brought suit claiming violations of the FDCA and  requesting FDA to be require to take enforcement actions. 

∙ Holding: for FDA. Omission of agency is up to their discretion. They are presumptively  unreviewable under 701(a)(2) of the Administrative Procedure Act, which is “committed  to agency discretion by law”. 

∙ Take Away­ if the agency does something it is reviewable, but if they omit to do  something it’s non­reviewable. There is no legal standard to determine whether the  agency has made a mistake in regards to prioritizing; there is no law to enforce. Decisions not to take enforcement action are presumably immune from review under APA. 

∙ However, if an agency doesn’t enforce something and they’re all the same type of case it  becomes a kind of systematic decision by the agency. Inaction can become action through intentionality (reflects implementation of policy) and then is reviewable. 

3. FINALITY: concerns the question of whether the agency’s action is determinative rather than preliminary or advisory. APA provides that only “final agency action” is subject to judicial  review. Final rule issued through notice­and­comment rule­making process, but proposed  rulemaking process is not final. 

∙ Usually, agency guidance documents will not meet the finality requirement because such  documents are neither binding nor the consummation of the agency’s decision making  process. However, if a court finds a guidance document is final (trigger other rules that  apply) then a court could hold that document procedurally invalid for not having been  issued through notice­and­comment rulemaking process. 

4. RIPENESS: a claim brought too soon is not the subject of a live case or controversy.  Coincides with article III “case” or “controversy” requirement. It has not become concrete or  individualized injury yet. You can’t sue for something that may or may not happen in the future. 

41

1. JUDICIAL DEFERENCE TO AGENCIES

EXAM ANALYSIS in regards to deference: Start with Skidmore because it covers all. It is a flexible sliding scale of review. Then, use Mead because it’s the sieve. You don’t get to chevron until you satisfy the mead test (premised on whether it’s the type of binding effect meant by congress and whether the agency took the steps to implement that kind of effect). If you get past mead, use chevron step one (did congress speak?). If no, then use Chevron step two, which is the deferential step. 

Skidmore v. Swift: Skidmore wanted time­and­a­half overtime pay for extra hours worked and  claimed that Swift violated the Fair Labor Standards Act. Court agreed. This case give the  standard of review that applies to agency action that falls outside chevron.

∙ This case said that although administrator rulings, interpretations, and opinions do not  control judicial decisions, they do constitute a body of experience and informed judgment to which courts and litigants may properly resort to guidance (partial deference).

∙ Take away­ interpreting the act through deference to the agency because they have more  expertise. Also, agency uses balancing act when doing their own interpretations, so the  court should defer because the agency has earned it through weighing all the factors  (shows previous thought). Can be used to patch over areas where Chevron does not  apply.

∙ This case was later overruled by Chevron USA v. Natural Resources Defense Council,  which basically said that the Agency's opinion should be controlling unless it is  unreasonable. Although, the Courts have recently come back to Skidmore, and found that not every decision should get complete (Chevron) deference. Some decisions are only  given     partial (    Skidmore) deference. 

US v. Mead Corp: Does a tariff classification ruling by the US Custom Service deserve judicial  deference under Chevron (they changed their interpretation)? No, but probably Skidmore partial  deference. 

∙ “Administrative interpretation of a particular statutory provision qualifies for Chevron deference when it appears that Congress delegated authority to the agency generally to  make rules carrying the force of law, and that the agency interpretation claiming  deference was promulgated in the exercise of that authority.”

∙ ***Generally, an agency action will almost always qualify got full Chevron consideration if it underwent notice­and­comment rule making. 

42

∙ To not receive Chevron deference, when agencies don’t have a rationale and there’s no  reasoning for their interpretation and implementation, then do not receive Chevron  deference. Also, look to if the agency could and didn’t use notice­and­comment. 

∙ What happens if an agency changes their mind? Must give notice to the party who they  regulated and then they are free to change course. 

    1. When Does Chevron Apply?     (Step Zero­     mead); When are agencies due deference?  ∙ Agency has to be involved + agency has to be interpreting or implementing + a statute. 

∙ Under this step, the court asks, as a threshold matter, whether an agency interpretation  meets certain requirements that entitle it to the application of Chevron. 

∙ If no, the court then reviews the interpretation using the old standard from Skidmore (some deference to agency interpretations they find persuasive) + judicial review.

∙ If yes, then they use Chevron analysis. Go to step one. 

Chevron Two­Step Structure: 

Step One: Directs reviewing courts to ask whether Congress has spoken to the precise issue in  question; whether the intent of Congress is clear. (Statutory interpretation and use textual tools). 

o Chevron deference comes in when you get past Step One. 

o If Chevron Step 1 does apply (Congress did not speak), then go to Step 2. 

o Illustration for Chevron Step One: FDA v. Brown & Williamson Tobacco: Can the FDA  regulate nicotine as a drug under their authority when congressional action in the past  regarding nicotine prevents the FDA from taking control of the drug? No. Later enacted  tobacco­specific legislation did not grant authority to the FDA, so the allocation of  authority prevented them from getting to step 2. 

o In FDA v. Brown Tobacco, the US Supreme Court held that the FDA improperly  attempted to regulate tobacco because congress unambiguously denied that  authority to FDA under Chevron step 1 in light of the sizable policy stakes  involved, contrary subsequent congressional legislation, and prior inconsistent  statements by FDA officials. 

Step Two: Unreasonable Agency Interpretations­ court’s analysis under step 2­ courts seek to  ensure that the agency interpretation is thoroughly considered and well explained, not “arbitrary  or capricious”. Seeks to make sure the agency did not abuse discretion or was otherwise not in  accordance with the law. 

o These tests and standards are straight out of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA).  43

o Usually if it gets to step 2, then the agency wins. The agency has to really screw up. 

Barnhart v. Walton: significance? Where reason trumps. Man with a mental illness found  himself unable to work and wanted social security benefits because he was “disabled”.  When the man applied for benefits, the administration said no because he was only disabled for 11 months.  Congress passed the act which prevented people receiving benefits if they’d been disabled for  less than 12 months, then there was an agency regulation, and an agency interpretation of the  rule. 

∙ Court said the agency wrote the rule and should be able to conclusively say what the rule  means and the court will defer to it. 

∙ Did the agency properly promulgate the regulation that was in the statute passed by  congress? Yes, still entitled to chevron level deference. 

***Mead says your chevron or you’re not; Barnhart says even if you don’t pass the  Mead standard, you can have Chevron deference. Remember, Skidmore allows the court  to defer.*** 

What happens in regards to these two situations: 

1­ Guidance­ is this entitled to deference? They can be entitled to Skidmore deference, but rarely Chevron. 

2­ Agency’s interpretation of its own regulation: no one knows the issues better than the  agency. Agency has authority and authorship and experience. Courts have usually deferred. 

∙ Example Application: memorandum issued by dept. of homeland security modified their  training manual. They did not change the underlying regulation, but it will likely lead  officers to deny more asylum claims. Only a 2 page analysis. 

o How could an advocate for Mexicans fleeing drug violence challenge the new  memorandum­ what standard of review would apply? Under Mead (step zero),  look to see if it is a regulatory action which leads to Chevron? If no, then use  Skidmore. If step one does apply, then step 2 gives us deferential review. 

2. JUDICIAL CONTROL OF AGENCY STAT. IMP. 

APA’s (administrative procedure act) judicial review provisions authorize courts to determine  whether the agencies have in fact followed the APA’s procedures. APA 706 specifies the  standard of review that courts are to employ. 

∙ They direct the court to hold unlawful and set aside agency action that is “arbitrary,  capricious, and abuse of discretion or otherwise not in accordance with the law.” This  is the arbitrary and capricious test. 

44

o What is deemed to be arbitrary and capricious? Normally, an agency rule  would be arbitrary and capricious if the agency has relied on factors which  congress has not intended it to consider, entirely failed to consider an important  aspect of the problem, offered an explanation for its decision that runs counter to  the evidence before the agency, or is so implausible that it could not be ascribed  to a difference in view or the product of agency expertise. Given to us in State  Farm case. 

∙ Decisions based on formal procedures are also subject to the requirement that they will be deemed unlawful if they are “unsupported by substantial evidence”. Called the  substantial evidence test. 

Citizens to Preserve Overton Park v. Wolpe: D was trying to build a big highway through the  city’s park. Secretary of Transportation had to show that there was no feasible and prudent  alternative route, which he did not do. 

∙ When does the APA not apply? When statutes have their own provisions to deal with  standard of review. In this case, the federal highway act of 1968 applies and the APA  does not. But later, the APA 706 applies in regards to the record and the agencies  decision. Under 706, standards of traditional review do apply to agency actions  (including the arbitrary and capricious standard). 

∙ Secretaries always want to put highways in the middle of parks because they don’t have  to pay for it or take land from owners or remove people from their homes. So what two  things does the secretary have to show to take the park land? 

1) No known feasible and prudent reasonable alternatives and,  

2) All possible planning minimizes harm to the park. 

∙ Court deemed that formal findings were not required, but judicial review based solely on  affidavits was not adequate. Affidavits were given by both sides­ in order to support their  own causes. 

∙ How did the court show arbitrary and capricious? While an agency doesn’t have to  make formal findings, they do have to show a record to support their decision and how  that record is linked to their ultimate decision. Court remands because there was no  record on which the secretary based his decision. Court wants assurance that it was a  rational decision. Even if it was a substantive decision, the court needs to know that. The  court gives deference to the agency, but wants a rigorous process for determining how  decisions were made. 

Motor Vehicle Manuf. Ass’n of US v. State Farm: Secretary of transportation rescinded a  previous rule saying that all cars must have airbags and seatbelts. Court blocked the recission of 

45

the rule because while an agency has the authority to reconsider its policies, they must articulate  a plausible reason for recission. 

∙ Did the agency have the right to take back the standard? Yes, but could not be for  arbitrary or capricious reasons. The agency’s only reason for rescinding the rule was  because they didn’t think people would wear them and wouldn’t like them. There is  nothing in the record to support the agency decision (Overton park). Failure to look at the totality of the record is sufficient to say that the agency’s decision to rescind the rule  completely, was arbitrary and capricious. 

∙ "An Agency's view of what is in the public interest may change, either with our without  a change in circumstances. But an Agency changing its course must supply a reasoned  analysis." 

∙ Why do you have the same standard when you promulgate a rule as when you rescind a  rule? Lesser standard shouldn’t be allowed for deregulatory action because action is  action, regardless of when it happened. It’s still an affirmative act to remove a rule and  should be held to the arbitrary and capricious standard.   

This case helps the Hard­Look Doctrine: which says that when conducting judicial reviews,  courts must conduct a substantial inquiry and determine whether: 

o The Secretary acted within the scope of his authority.

o His decision was within the small range of available choices.

o He could have reasonably believed that there were no feasible alternatives. 

o The actual choice was not "arbitrary, capricious, an abuse of discretion, or otherwise not in accordance with law."

o He followed the necessary procedural requirements. 

3. JUDICIAL CONTROL OF AGENCY PROCEDURE

Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power v. Natural Resources Defense Council: issue­ what to do about  nuclear reactor hazardous waste? In issuing permits for power plants, agencies can either  consider waste or not. If not, then waste is determined through its own rule making (notice­and comment). 

∙ Who won? Vermont Yankee Power Plant. Why? Because the agency didn’t use the right  rule making procedures. APA 553­ specified the minimum agencies must do. They aren’t required to do more than that. 

∙ One of the most deferential cases! Rewrote the rules. Agencies can do more if they  choose, but courts can’t make them. Gives agencies the freedom to choose whatever rules 

46

they think are appropriate as long as they are constitutional. Whereas Overton is stricter  and requires record basis.  

o 3008(b and h) ­ They are not required to conduct formal hearings, but would have  a right to public hearings. Formal adjudicatory procedures are applicable only to  certain orders which include a suspension or revocation of status or an assessment of penalties for noncompliance. 

US v. Nova Scotia Food Products: deals with a rule that essentially destroyed a company’s  product (whitefish that couldn’t be cooked the way the rule wanted it to be). The company sued  and the question was whether the agency could be allowed to withhold certain information (like  the scientific information). 

∙ Take­away: generally, the rule is that agencies may resort to their own expertise  outside the record in informal rule making proceedings. You want an agency to be an  expert and have to regurgitate to the record everything they know. 

∙ This case is the exception to the rule­ unusual factors that allowed the rule to be struck  down only in regards to this one company because it was arbitrary and capricious. The  company tried to show the agency additional information, which the agency would not  consider and they would not share their credible scientific evidence. 

Ex parte contacts (def.) are communications between the agency and an individual off the  record.

HBO v. FCC: HBO met separately with FCC and other parties for deals, but none of the private  ex parte communications were in the record. Court said this was no fair and corrupt. 

∙ Reasoning:  ex parte communication undermines the validity and integrity of agency  decisions. The agency has to rely on information in the record, so ex parte cannot occur. 

∙ However, if ex parte communication happens somehow, then a written document or a  summary of any oral communication must be placed in the public file established for  each rulemaking docket immediately after the communication is received so that  interested parties may comment thereon. 

47

Stat Reg. Outline

Structure of a Modern Statute (p.166):

Title: the formal title states the basic purpose or function of the statute. 

Enacting clause: meant to proclaim the fact that the statute has become law.  Short Title: for the sake of reference. (Also called popular name)

Statement of Purpose, Preamble, and findings 

Definitions: typically, but not always appear at the beginning of the statute. 

Operative Provisions: the heart and soul of the statute. Contain the result the statute is  trying to achieve or the state it is attempting to create. May also contain exceptions. 

Subordinate Operative Provisions: supportive of or secondary to the main  objective. 

Implementation Provisions: legs and arms of the statute. They enable the statute to do  what it purports to do. Criminal sanctions and penalties. “The Teeth”

** (Statutes do not always separate their operative and implementation provisions. Are combined in older statutes).

Specific repeals and related amendments: if a statute either repeals of amends another  statute, then it may contain a statement to that effect. 

Preemption Provision: bars the application of state law. 

Exception­ Expiration Date­ a statute may contain a provision indicating that it will  expire or “sunset” on a specific date. 

Criminal statutes are different than regular interpretations because they are seen more narrowly,  to be fairer to the public. How do you determine specific definitions (dictionaries should match  the purpose)? What are legislative’s history’s limits? Absurd Result­ look to the result reached  by the statute in a variety of situations and see if it’s logical or not (ex­ women pushing a baby  carriage in a park). Also page 17.

WHERE STATUTES COME FROM? (IN ORDER)

∙ The legislative process: any legislation passed has to go through both houses of congress  (bicameralism) and be signed by the President. 

∙ Good Advice: Intervene early and often. Participate in the drafting and hearings process.  Build relationships before you bring the bill. 

1

Ex­ apple settlement for children downloading apps on their parents account. Apple held  parents responsible. Is there a legislative response that might be merited and how could that  be brought about? Yes. Group would like a statute that says a computer manufacturer cannot  hold the parent responsible for downloads of minors in their families. 

1) The ability to draft legislation is open to the public, but the ability to introduce it is  limited and has windows of time. You could also hire lobbyists to draft legislation.  You  select a legislator to introduce your bill (which districts are most friendly and which  legislator cares). 

a. Congressional legislators are the ones who can draft and introduce legislation into a session of Congress. 

2) Referral­ hearings before a committee. But there are lots of committees, so who chooses  which one it goes to? The speaker of the house. Matters how you draft the text of your  bill. Some committees may be more receptive than others. So you can help influence  which one you go to. The speaker of the house can also refer to multiple committees if he thinks they apply. 

a. Once you’re in front of the committee, you have a hearing that generates  information needed and gives a committee report. Then it is referred back to the  house. 

b. In the senate, who makes the decision? Senate presiding officer. 

3) Floor Scheduling­ huge differences between house and senate. The House has more  rules related to scheduling, where the senate does not. The more important the issue, the  faster it will be heard. If it’s controversial, it gets put on the calendar as a major bill.  House has the ability to make rules (germane). In the senate, there are no special rules.  You can filibuster­ you have to have unanimous consent of the senate to proceed on  scheduling of the bill (not the bill itself). 

**Opposing group options: Now an opposing group (computer association) joins the scene and  wants to kill the bill. It would be logical to try and kill it during the hearings process. You could  also select your own legislator. 90% of bills die. One other reason a lot of bills die is how it gets  calendared. Minority group can filibuster in the senate. 

Vetogates that will automatically result in the death of pending legislation: 1) failure by the  speaker of the house to refer the bill to committee and 2) a majority of the committee which has  received the bill fails to report it back to the house or senate. 

4) Floor Consideration­ the house floor: only people that speak are the representatives  themselves. Amendments can be made in order to try to get people to vote with you. You  write the rules as you go. Senate can filibuster at this level again. 

o Budgets and appropriations get moved up and passed faster. 

2

5) Reconciliation­ we have passed the house and the senate, but now have two bills.  Now you have to reconcile the two together. The house or the senate could also choose  one bill or the other instead of combining. Also, a conference committee could generate  their own report, important for interpretation purposes 

o This is the final killing zone in congress. 

6) President­ The president can sign or veto the bill. However, the president doesn’t have to veto it in order for it to die. He can just not sign it within 10 days and “pocket veto” it,  so if the congressional term ends before it’s signed, then it’s vetoed and can’t be brought  back because congress is out. If congress isn’t out, they could overturn the veto by a 2/3 

vote. President can also use a signing statement­ giving their statement of interpretation  of the bill and/or ordering the executive branch whether to enforce. 

Lobbyists and Law Firms­ most lawyers charge for services on an hourly basis or on a  contingency basis (% of the winnings). Lobbyists are not providing legal research or showing up  in a courtroom, but know people and get paid by retainer (a lump sum). Get paid on a monthly  basis as to whether or not they’re needed. Most law firms can’t hold onto lobbyists because it’s  harder for them to see their economic return. 

Review Question Example: If the governor of Texas chooses not to sign a bill that has passed  both chambers of the Texas legislature with less than 15 days left in the current legislative  session, he has allowed the bill to become law. 

WHAT ACTUALLY GOES INTO WRITING A BILL?

Legislative drafting process; the whole process is intensely collaborative. ∙ Dickerson’s suggestions for Legislative Drafting­ 

1) Collect the facts (significant and relevant facts)

2) Think of related law (harmonize with existing laws and know what the current  laws are).

3) Outline

4) Think of your legislative audience (be simple and understood for general  public, but sometimes levels of specificity can be required)

5) Vertically­ draftsman ties to deal with all the problems affecting each 

successive segment. Writing it top to bottom. 

6) Horizontally­ try to deal with only one or two problems at a time for the bill as  a whole.  

This gets sent to committee which can mark up or change your bill/statute. It is never only under  the control of one person or the original writer. Then, the calendar leads to floor debate, where it  3

can be changed even more. The drafting process provides some kind of structure, but the bill will still go through a hodge podge of change. 

Legislators might have to make changes and corrections to the bill on the fly (“doing the bill on  the floor”). Specific fears of drafting on the floor include:

∙ Provisions being “slipped in” 

∙ People losing track of whether one provision squared with another 

∙ A provision being added to satisfy the needs of a senator in trouble for reelection  What do legislators do in order to get a bill passed they may not agree on? ­ Use passive language, 

­ Make diction more ambiguous (gets decided by courts and agencies),  ­ Drafting may be intentionally bad. 

Three Theories of the Legislative Process: 

1) Public Choice Theory­ models voters, politicians, and bureaucrats as mainly self interested. To move towards a medium decision. Deeply cynical view of politics.  Economics is based on the rational man who makes decisions that are the best for  himself. Just replace money with politics. They will act rationally in order to maximize  their individual holdings, whether or not it is good for the public as a whole. The general  held beliefs of the population can be outweighed by the higher cares of special interest  groups (even though there’s less people). Politicians will act in ways that will get them  re­elected. 

2) Social Choice Theory­ combines individual opinions, preferences, interests, or welfare  to reach a collective decision or social welfare in some sense. Mathematical formula for  what order you vote in. How people actually vote­ the mechanics, not the values. If you  structure a vote with different timing and tiers, then it can affect the answer each time. 

3) Positive Political Theory­ strategically vote to get something in the long term, even  though it may go against their current beliefs. Vote for Hilary Clinton, so Obama would  not get the democratic election. Takes gain theory and self­conscious predictions to see  how people will make voting decisions. 

Problems with Snack Attack Statute:  

1) Impossibility­ wrong time; does Shipleys even make dairy free kolaches? 4

What do you do with a statute that has impossible provisions? You can try to interpret the statute within semantic range in order to satisfy the point of the statute. How far can a  court push the language?

2) Indefinite Term­ If a statute fails to specify the time frame for its operation, the court  typically can imply a term or time from general language in the statute as needed to  effectuate its statutory purpose.  Of course, this rule isn’t hard and fast – for example, a  court might not be able to infer an effective time frame for a statute if it creates an  ambiguity that causes constitutional issues by imposing a retroactive criminal liability. 3) Excessive Specificity­ don’t limit yourself.  

4) Veto Bate­ unacceptable parts that effect the provision. Don’t be too outlandish.  5) Preemption/Integration Question­ Must look at university policy in regards to  attendance and see how that applies to the statute. Is this classroom allowed to have food  in it? 

Why is a statute different than a contract? There is nothing in the constitution limiting  congress’ power to target one person, statutes and contracts can both be conditional, but a  contract must have consideration, whereas statutes do not.  

THEORIES OF STATUTE INTERPRETATION

Tool of Statutory Interpretation­ is an instrument for ascertaining the meaning of a statute,,  like the dictionary. 

Theory of Statutory Interpretation­ a normative view of how courts should interpret statutes.  Concern the role of our courts in our governance system. A particular theory of statutory  interpretation may lead a court to exclude or deemphasize particular tools. 

∙ Textualism­ permits courts to rely on dictionaries as a source of statutory meaning, but  prohibits them from relying on indications of legislative intent in the legislative history.  Text should be the sole tool of interpretation. This has become the starting point for  most interpretation now. 

∙ Intentionalism­ instructs courts to implement legislative intent, even when that intent is  not clear from the plain meaning of the statutory text and discernible only through other  sources, like legislative intent. (More specific than Purposivism). Look for the specific  intent that congress had when passing the statute. 

∙ Purposivism­ courts began to shift their focus away from the actual intent of Congress to the broad purposes of the statute. Look to the larger purpose of congress and interpret the  statute in a way to achieve that purpose. 

5

∙ Legal Process Purposivism­ when there is ambiguity in the statute, the courts should  determine what a reasonable legislature would have sought to achieve in the  circumstances. (Kinds of seems like the reasonable person standard).

∙ Imaginative Reconstruction­ it applies when congress failed to appreciate an issue and  therefore, cannot be understood as having an intention as to that issue. Asks the court to  stand in the shoes of congress. When congress has not stated an intent or purpose, the  court should imagine what congress (or a “reasonable” congress) would have said when  faced with a particular question. 

∙ Dynamic Interpretation­ sees courts more as partners with congress than as faithful  agents of the enacting congress in developing the meaning of statutes. Courts are  applying their own understandings and values in order to interpret statutes. 

∙ Absurd Result Doctrine­ most controversial. Look to page 17 for application.

**Look at text first, then at the structure of the statute. If there’s still ambiguity then an intentionalist will look to what congress intended, then look to absurd results doctrine (result should not be clearly unacceptable). Look to intent and then purpose. ** 

Church of the Holy Trinity v. United States­ does the federal law prohibiting bringing in foreign  labor apply to a church paying for the importation of their new pastor? No. 

∙ The court held that the term "laborer" in the federal statute applied only to cheap  unskilled labor, and not to professional occupations, such as ministers and pastors  (Textualism). Even though it does not actually say this in the statute. For this, the Court  looked to intention.  

o Ex­ like when they claimed that they did not think “Congress intended” for the  law to apply in the present case. 

∙ You can argue that the words are ambiguous because we don’t know what kind of  “labor” the statute meant to prohibit. Statutes’ purpose was to prohibit foreign manual  labor, which was ruining the US work market (the court looked to legislative history for  this). The senate report said that they recommended changing “labor” to “manual labor”, but they didn’t change it because they wanted the bill to get passed. 

o Arguments against legislative history use­ you can cherry pick legislative history  to find things to support your position, instead of looking at review as a whole. If  they meant to say it, then they should/would have said it. The note provides  exclusions for artists, actors, and so on… by not mentioning pastors, the statute  meant to include them. Statute claims “any person” “in any manner whatsoever” 

6

for “service of any kind”, so Congress was attempting to make the statute very  broad. 

∙ “Absurd result” doctrine­ (pg 17) could thwart the development of religion in the US  by not allowing pastors to come in. Not a great argument because they’re referencing  people from before America was a country (Christopher Columbus and the King of  Spain). 

o Can the court just change the parts that make it “absurd” or do they have to scrap  the whole thing? Usually, a court will not override one portion of the statute.  However, congress can expressly state that the rest of the statute remains in effect  even if the courts declare one portion of it unconstitutional; think of it as a  statutory severability clause. 

∙ Take Away Idea: Reflects the widely shared assumption that the primary role for our  courts is to serve as “faithful agents” of congress in interpreting statutes, that is, to  “identify and enforce the legal directives that an appropriately informed interpreter would conclude the enacting legislature meant to establish”.

SETS OF TEXTUAL TOOLS USED TO INTERPRET STATUTES How do we figure out what the words mean in the statutes? 

Ordinary Meaning vs. Technical Meaning: 

The plain meaning rule directs courts to give effect to the text if it has a plain meaning— that is the text is not only a starting point but the stopping point. The plain meaning rule, also  known as the literal rule, is a type of statutory construction, which dictates that Statutes are to be interpreted using the ordinary meaning of the language of the Statute unless a Statute explicitly  defines some of its terms otherwise. 

Nix v. Hedden­ Duty imposed on vegetables, but not fruit. P brought tomatoes into the country  and tried to argue that they were fruit, and therefore not subject to tax. Holding­ tomatoes are  vegetables. How to determine the meaning of the word: 

1) Atomic level: look to dictionary definitions; but different dictionaries can give different  definitions. How do you choose which one to use? The court uses 3 different dictionaries, but doesn’t rely on any of them for judgment. 

a. Judicial notice­ the court acknowledges a commonly accepted and known fact,  but doesn’t establish its existence by admitting evidence to support it; used  infrequently. Here, common use of the word vegetable encompasses tomato, even  though botanical definition declares a tomato a fruit. 

i. What would people expect? People deserve to have notice of the law that  way they don’t accidentally violate it. 

7

2) No special meaning accorded to “fruit” or “vegetables” in the industry or trade. Used  witnesses, who had been in the business for 30 years and asked them the definitions.  Looks to setting. 

3) Ordinary Meaning and Cultural notions (common language) ­ tomatoes usually eaten  as vegetables for dinner. Looks to audience. Court will use terms accessible to the public for penal statutes. 

Muscarello v. United States­ United States won the case in a 5­4 decision. Is the phrase “carries a firearm” limited to the carrying of firearms on the person, or does it apply more broadly to  having the firearm in your car? 

∙    18 USC Statute 924 (c)(1): “Whoever, during and in relation to any crime of violence or  drug trafficking crime…uses or carries a firearm…” gets an automatic sentence of 5  years.    

∙    Reasons for the majority’s broad interpretation: No special legal meaning; congress  intended for usual common English meaning. So, you can “carry” a firearm with you in  transport, in your car. Carry actually came from the ancient word for “cart”. (SC goes  into definitions provided by King James Bible, Melville, and Defoe­ great writers must  know the language). They also surveyed news articles and modern press (2/3 of news  stories used “carry” in the way of “conveyance”). Precedent. 

o    Acknowledges ambiguity, but cites that lenity can only be invoked if the statute  has a grievous ambiguity. There is a threshold for allowable ambiguity. Every  statute, no matter how perfectly drafted, will have some type of ambiguity. 

∙    [Dissent]: transport is a better word for carry. Majority was cherry picking from a  spectrum of possible definitions. There is more than one possible definition. They want to use the word “carry” narrowly. If there’s ambiguity, it should go for the defendant  because of the principle of lenity (pg 13). 

CANONS OF CONSTRUCTION

Courts almost always start with the text itself, and then expand outward to other statutory  provisions, statute structure, and other statutes. Move from narrow to broad.  

Canons of Construction can be divided into 3 broad categories: 

       1) Textual Canons

a) Linguistic Canons­ grammar or syntactic cannons; rules or presumptions about how  words fit together within a particular provision. Based on grammar, punctuation, or  associated words in a particular provision.

8

b) Whole Act Canons­ presumptions or rules about the meaning of a term in relation to  other terms, phrases, or provisions in the same statute. If you are comparing the text  in one provision to the text in other provisions of the same statute, you are invoking a  whole act canon. 

c) Whole Code Canons­ seek to make sense of a word in light of other statutes in the US Code. If you are seeking to reconcile the text of one stature with the text of another  statute, you are invoking a whole code canon.

       2) Substantive Canons 

       3) Other Canons (absurd results and scrivener’s errors)

Babbitt v. Sweet Home Chapter of Communities for a Great Oregon: court trying to determine  whether the word “take” in the endangered species act includes the definition of “harm”, which  would include habitat modification that kills or injures wildlife. SC rules that it does. 

∙    ESA makes it criminally and civilly actionable to cause the death of any endangered  animal. 3(19): “Take” means harassing, harming, pursuing, hunting, shooting, wounding, killing, capturing, or collecting. 50 CFR 17.3: “Harm” means an act which actually kills  or injures wildlife…may include significant habitat modification”. 

∙   Arguments for inclusion of harm definition: 

o   Textual Canon: Justice Stevens relied on the textual maxim ejusdem generis to  define the term “harm” in the same fashion to other specific terms used in the  statutory definition of “take”. 

o   Linguistic Canon: term defined explicitly. Who defined it? The department of the interior defined it through the reading of the statute.  

o    Avoid surplusage of excess words in 3(19). What does harm include that the  other terms don’t already capture? Harm could be seen as a catch all. 

o    Legislative intent/purpose­ meant to be a broad and inclusive act. 

∙ Arguments for exclusion of harm definition: 

o    Noscitur a sociis (you know a word by its associates) Interpret the word “harm”  with the words around it; the common characteristic from a list of words. 

o    Congress’ Intent: Congress left out private corporations and individuals for a  reason, only mentioned federal agencies in section 7 of the act. Section 9’s  absence of explicit standards for private corporations. 

 Expressio Unius: the express mention of one thing excludes all others.

9

o    Normal definition of harm requires direct action and intent (cultural norm­  common understanding of the word harm because the statute applies to a very  wide audience). 

o   Legislative History: one congressman has offered the comment that if there’s a  habitat restriction, the government can buy it. 

A) LINGUISTIC CANONS

Linguistic Canons are useful for interpreting words in the narrowest text in which they appear:  within the provision of a statute. While a court will generally give identical words and phrases in  a statute the same meaning, it can ignore this fundamental canon and define the same word in the same statute differently if it has reason to believe that Congress used that term in two different  sense. 

The three most prominent canons are known by Latin phrases: 

1. Ejusdem Generis: “of the same kind” 

∙    When a statute sets out a series of specific items ending with a general term, the general  term is confined to covering subjects comparable to the specifics it follows. The catch­all  is bound and restricted by the list itself. 

∙    When general words follow a list of specific words in a statutory enumeration, the  general words are construed to embrace only objects similar in nature to the objects  enumerated by the preceding specific words. Ex: “….and other acts”. 

∙     Ali v. Federal Bureau of Prisons (U.S. 2008): 

o   Claim for lost items can’t apply to “any officers of customs or excise or any other law officer”. Does this statute apply to a prison officer/guard when an inmate’s  things that have been taken disappear? No­ court determine ejusdem generis  didn’t apply because the list doesn’t share a common attribute and includes  “disjunctive” pairings. 

2. Noscitur a Sociis: “a thing is known by its companions” or “known by the company it keeps” 

∙    This is a tool to clarify the meaning of a broad catch all term at the end of a list of more  specific terms; a word is given more precise content by the neighboring words with  which it is associated. Aims to ensure that a term is interpreted consistently with  surrounding words so as not to unduly expand statutes beyond their reasonable reach. 

o   Will not apply when a court finds no common feature linking the terms  surrounding the one in question (same as Ejusdem Generis). Can either narrow or  broaden. 

10

∙    United States v. Williams: Statute that essentially has a catch all that criminalizes actions  regarding child pornography. Applies to anyone who “advertises, promotes, presents, or  solicits” child pornography. What does “present” mean and does this make the statute too broad, as to violate the 1st amendment? 

o    The broad meaning “presents” is narrowed because of the words around it,  dealing with commercial transactions to convey the information and promote the  industry. Used Noscitur a Sociis. 

o    What about a delivery man who doesn’t know what’s in the package? Wouldn’t  apply because of the other words in the list. He would not be promoting or  advertising child pornography in any way because he is not aware of what he’s  doing. 

3. Expressio Unis: “the mention of one thing is the exclusion of another” 

∙    Courts apply the canon when they can infer from the inclusion of one term that the  omission of another term was intentional. If you don’t say it, then you meant for it to  be excluded. (Puts a tremendous burden on Congress). Inference that items not mentioned were excluded by deliberate choice, not inadvertence or by accident. 

∙    Again, requires that the group shares a characteristic or association. 

More Specific Variations of Expressio Unis Include:     

∙    A list of specific exceptions to a general prohibition means that Congress intentionally  excluded any further exceptions. 

o Ex­ If there’s one exception listed, that means that all other exceptions were  purposefully excluded.

∙    If the statute requires an action to be performed in a particular way (compliance), that  requirement reflects a decision by Congress to prohibit other ways to perform that action.

o Ex­ By making organizations work a certain way, you are purposefully excluding  any other way that they could do things­ even if they’re better, faster, or cheaper. 

∙    When congress specifies a mode of preemption for a statute, the courts will not imply  additional areas of preemption based on the substantive provision of the statute (so  Congress intended to foreclose other general types of preemption. 

o Ex­ Congress can intentionally draft preemption which trumps state preemptions. Other Linguistic Canons: 

11

∙    Punctuation: alone is rarely sufficient to sustain or contradict an interpretation.  Arguments based on punctuation are less strong that those based on other tools or canons. The deadly comma (“knowingly”), limited weight of parentheticals.  

∙    The Last Antecedent Rule: a limiting phrase only applies to the clause immediately  before it, and doesn’t migrate upward through the statute. 

o Ex­ the errant teenager’s house party. 

∙    Conjunctive v. Disjunctive: terms connected by a disjunctive (like “or”) should be given separate meanings, unless the context dictates otherwise. When a court senses a “careless  usage”, it may substitute “or” for “and” and vice versa. 

∙    May v. Shall: the word “may” connotes a permissive or discretionary action, whereas the word “shall” connotes a mandatory one. *Note the ambiguity of shall. FRCP had a  massive rewrite to purge this problem.

∙    The Dictionary Act (p.  277): federal statute enacted by congress “to supply rules of  construction for all legislation” (1871). Attempts to define terms commonly used in  federal statutes. But there are some parts that have been updated to deal with current  issues. Federal courts have not found it binding on their ability to exercise full judicial  review or disagree with those definitions. 

o   Also, Texas has its own Code Construction Act which defines words and how to  interpret them. (serves similar and other purposes)

B) WHOLE ACT CANONS

The whole act rule instructs courts to view statutory terms as a part of the entire legislation in  which they were enacted. There are several more concrete principles regarding whole act canons:

1)    Identical Words—consistent/identical meaning

2)   Avoiding Redundancy and Surplusage: it is a cardinal principle of statutory  construction that a statute ought upon the whole, to be so construed that, if it can be  prevented, no clause, sentence, or word shall be superfluous, void, or insignificant. 

Maxims that fall within the whole act canon:  

(1) Title: However, title alone is not controlling. Positive ex­ holy trinity invoked the title of  the statute to support its conclusion. 

(2) Provisos: are clauses that state exceptions to or limitations on the application of a statute for example­ “provided that…” While a proviso customarily applies to the clause  immediately preceding it, courts can apply it more broadly. 

12

C) WHOLE CODE CANONS

The whole code rule directs courts to construe language in one statute by looking to language in  other statutes. Like the whole act rule, the whole code rule has more specific sub­rules” 

∙    In pari materia: statutes addressing the same subject matter generally should be read ‘as  if they were one law’. Under this canon, a later act can be regarded as a legislative  interpretation of an earlier act in the sense that it aids in ascertaining the meaning of  words used in their contemporary setting. 

o    ***Assumes that whenever Congress passes a new statute, it acts aware of all  previous statutes on the same subject.*** 

∙    Inferences across statutes: when congress uses the same language in two statutes having similar purposes, particularly when one is enacted shortly after the other, it is appropriate  to presume that Congress intended the text to have the same meaning in both statutes. 

∙    Repeals by implication: repeals by implication are not favored and will not be presumed  unless the intention of the legislature to repeal is clear and manifest. 

What to look at when dealing with a statute:  

∙    For words: dictionary, common law definition, technical meaning, and judicial notice  (when the court, under its own power, acknowledges a fact that everybody already knows something). 

∙    For sentences/paragraph: Ejusdem Generis, Noscitur a Sociis, Expressio Unis, or v. and,  the last antecedent rule, may v. shall, parenthetical (punctuation). 

∙    For past the paragraph: whole act canon, then the whole code rule (largest entity), in pari  materia, titles and provisos, identical words=identical meaning, avoiding surplusage. 

MORE SUBSTANTIVE CANONS OF CONSTRUCTION:

Rule of Lenity: most fundamental universally held of all the canons we’ll study. Whenever  the language of the statute is ambiguous, the court will rule in the defendant’s favor. Directs  courts to resolve “doubts” or ambiguities in criminal statues in favor of criminal defendants. The  punishment is too severe to rely on ambiguous language. There is nothing of greater punishment  than to deprive you of your liberty.

∙     How ambiguous does a statute need to be before the court invokes the rule of lenity? Generally, a court will insist on a substantial ambiguity that it cannot resolve through  traditional tools of statutory construction.  As we saw in Muscarello, though, justices can  strongly disagree on how much ambiguity must exist in a statute before a defendant can  successfully invoke the rule of lenity.

13

∙    United States v. Santos: gambling and money laundering case. Court has to decide if the  word “proceeds” in the case, refers to gross income or net income (profits). Court holds  that it refers to profits because of the rule of lenity: because the statute was ambiguous in  this regard, they interpreted it in favor of the Defendant. 

o    Merger Problem. Ex­ You can commit crimes that can be prosecuted under  several different statutes. So a lesser offense may apply because higher offenses  requires different elements to be proven. Money laundering is not necessarily the  same thing as gambling. They are two offenses that might fall under this statute. 

∙ Alito Dissent: what does proceeds mean? Looks at other statutes (but they were after this  one, so it’s not legislative history), but he tries to look at what they were thinking.  However, Alito is looking at state statutes to interpret a federal law! 

o    “Absurd results doctrine” he is looking at an outcome that could be cast in terms  that the statute doesn’t make sense unless you interpret it a certain way. 

∙ If there is a split case (4­4­1) you go with the interpretation that is narrowest.  In Texas, the legislature has told the courts not to apply the rule of lenity to penal statutes. 

Remedial Purposes Canon: usually for civil statutes. When the legislature passes a statute  to address a specific ill, then the courts will broadly interpret that statute to achieve the purpose  of remedying that ill. 

∙   “Remedial legislation should be construed broadly to effectuate its purpose”. For a statute  to be deemed remedial, it must have been directed at remedying a prior problem. 

∙    Ex­ anti­discrimination statutes or reforms. Once a court determines that a statute is  remedial, it then construes that statute broadly in order to effectuate its purposes. 

∙    Remedial Purposes are usually treated dismissively because most statutes are in some  way remedying a problem. 

The Canon of Constitutionality: requires a court to avoid interpretations of statutes that  render them unconstitutional or raise serious doubts about their constitutionality, at least when  other interpretations of the statute are permissible. There are two primary formulations of the  doctrine: 

1) Unconstitutionality Canon: (Traditional Form­ narrower) ­ the doctrine provides as  between two possible interpretations of a statute, by one of which it would be  unconstitutional and by the other valid, the court’s plain duty is to adopt the one which  will save the act    . There must be ambiguity in the statute in the 1st   place.  

a.   This rule is a categorical one, meaning that every reasonable construction must be  resorted to, in order to save a statute from unconstitutionality. 

14

b.   One of the interpretations has to be declared unconstitutional (harder to prove).  This is the stronger Canon!

2) Constitutional Avoidance Canon (Modern Variant) ­ the doctrine requires that a statute  must be construed, if fairly possible, so as to avoid not only the conclusion that it is  unconstitutional, but also grave doubts upon that score. Courts should avoid  interpretations that raise a serious question as to the constitutionality of a statute. 

a.   There just has to be enough unconstitutionality to bring up a red flag, not be  proven. 

b.   Two elements required to invoke the constitutional avoidance canon: 

(1)    Some ambiguity in the language of the statute that creates multiple    interpretations. 

(2)    One of those interpretations has to have serious constitutional 

problems/doubts.

Zadvydas v. Davis: whether the statute authorizing detaining of a removable alien should be  interpreted as being allowing indefinitely or only for a period reasonably necessary to secure the  alien’s removal? Implicit “reasonable time” limitation. 

∙    Constitutional Avoidance Canon used: Where there are two interpretations, one of  which would raise serious constitutional problems, the court should always choose the  interpretation that does not. (i.e. only for a reasonable time, because indefiniteness raises  a 5th amendment concern). 

o   The court does not have to prove that the other option would definitely be  unconstitutional, only that it would raise “grave doubts” upon the issue. 

o   Ambiguity required­ there has to be more than one way to interpret the statute. 

∙    Justice Breyer thinks 6 months is a reasonable period of time. They use this same time  period for other administrative purposes, so 6 months is good for uniformity. After 6  months, the immigrant presents evidence that the US can rebut. They’re stuck there until  they can present evidence. The longer you sit in the cell, the higher the government’s  burden is to prove that you should be there (continuing threat).  

∙    Dissent: there is no ambiguity in the statute, so the constitutional avoidance canon should  not be applicable.

Almendarez­Torres v. United States: P was an alien who after being deported for the commission of an aggravated felony unlawfully returned to the US. Just returning to the US would cause  them to be imprisoned for not more than 2 years, but returning with an aggravated felony would  cause them to be imprisoned for not more than 20 years. 

15

∙    Issue: Does part of the same statute define a separate crime or simply authorize an  enhanced penalty? It was a penalty provision that allowed the court to increase the  sentence for a recidivist who had committed an aggravated felony. 

∙    What was the reasoning why justice breyer decided this was not a free standing crime, but rather an enhanced penalty? Legislative history and intent. Focuses on the degree of  certainty (amount needed to trigger the constitutional avoidance doctrine is lacking).  Ambiguity here is not strong enough for cons. avoidance. 

∙    If this wasn’t a penalty, then it would be a separate crime that the US would have to  prove. Who decides? The judge, as opposed to a jury of your peers. Justice Scalia’s  dissent focuses on the text. He disagrees with justice breyer as to the canon of  constitutional avoidance. He thinks the issue of a jury trial is a constitutional issue raised.

∙    Rule of Lenity could apply: this is a penal statute with 20 possible years imprisonment.  Where the statute is ambiguous, they rule in favor of the defendant. Breyer doesn’t think  the statute is ambiguous, so he didn’t mention it in his opinion. 

FEDERALISM CLEAR STATEMENT RULE

Federalism Clear Statement Rule: Under this rule, the courts will not interpret a statute in a  way that impinges on matters of core state sovereignty unless Congress has clearly and directly  stated that it wishes to do so. Protects federalism interests. Courts will not implement language  which would unduly unhinge on the sovereignty of the state unless it was clearly stated. This is a legislative drafting principle. 

Gregory v. Ashcroft: Two petitioners, both Missouri state judges, challenged the state  constitution’s retirement requirement (70 years old). They claimed that it violated the ADEA act  (federal age discrimination in employment act). 

∙    Issue: Does the Missouri mandatory retirement requirement for state judges violate the  federal age discrimination in employment act? No. 

o    In Gregory, the appointment of judges fell into the category of core state  sovereign functions, and the Court demanded that Congress expressly state that it  meant for the Americans with Disabilities Act to apply to state judges.

(Federalism clear statement rule). 

∙    ADEA does not apply to “policy­making” appointees, such as state court judges.  Governor Ashcroft looks at the plain language of the statute to determine the meaning.  The judges were appointed by the governor and then re­elected (but the 1st appointment is what matters). 

16

o   Noscitur a Sociis: looks to the language of the statute to determine that since  exemptions 1 and 3 refer only to those in close working relationships with elected  officials, so too much 2. 

∙    Court employed the rational basis test: there is a reasonable relationship between  Missouri’s goal of promoting competent state judges and its retirement requirement. 

∙   ***Justice O’Connor said that Congress had to be clearer in their statements and acts if  they were going to take away state’s rights (in this case, ADEA was ambiguous). They  had to write their statutes in a clear way, or the court would not interpret them the way  they wanted­ drafting principle. (federalism clear statement rule) 

o   Whenever Congress intends to alter the federal­state balance, it must do so  expressly in the statute. 

TYPES OF PREEMPTION

Presumption against Preemption: the presumption rests on the notion that the historic  police powers of the states are not to be superseded…unless that was the clear and manifest  purpose of congress. 

∙    The presumption against preemption “provides assurance that the federal­state balance  will not be disturbed unintentionally by congress of unnecessarily by the courts”. 

∙    The presumption against preemption states a default as to how a statue should be  construed (I.e. so as not to preempt state law) that can be overcome based on clear  language or other strong evidence that Congress intended otherwise. 

    Can be applied in two circumstances: 

1) When a federal statute contains an express preemption provision (courts can construe the provision narrowly to preempt some state laws but not others),   

    If congress speaks clearly, then they can preempt a state statute, but 

language has to be clear. Where language is ambiguous, courts interpret it  narrowly.

2) And when it does not. 

The Presumption against Retroactivity: a statute operates retroactively if the new  provision attaches new legal consequences to events completed before its enactment. The court  has found that Congress has authorized retroactive effect only when the statutory language is “so clear that it could sustain only one interpretation”. 

∙   The court has treated the presumption against retroactivity as an exception to the general  principle that a court should apply the law in effect at the time of its decision. 

17

∙    Ex­ we are going to impose a fine on anyone who conducted the act before the statute  was enacted. If it did do damage and that damage continues to the date of enaction, then  they are fined. Can congress legislate penalties on ongoing effects of previous damages?  This is murkier. 

∙    Why do we need this maxim? Doesn’t the constitution prohibit ex post facto laws? Yes,  but the court has claimed that ex post facto ONLY applies to criminal activities, not civil proceedings. However, congress must still be express! 

∙    What about remedial purposes canon? Usually loses against preemption. 

The Presumption against Extraterritorial Application: applying this presumption,  the court has held that numerous statutes do not apply outside the territorial boundaries of the  US. It operates like the clear statement rule, essentially requiring Congress to make clear its  intention for a particular statute to have effect beyond the territorial borders of the US. 

∙    Ex­ they pass a statute against bribing public officials, which is applied with vigor in the  US. It became the norm for US corporations to bribe officials of other nations for certain  rights. Can they apply the US statute to the foreign officials? Not it it’s just a general  anti­bribery statute. It needs to be more clear and precise. If Congress wanted the statute  to apply to foreign powers, then they should have particularly stated their intention.  Unless congress is express, the statute will not be given international sweep.

Two interpretive principles:  

1)  Scrivener’s Errors: directs courts to correct legislative drafting mistakes, or so­called  scrivener’s errors. Courts will correct these to effectuate what congress really meant to  say or what otherwise makes sense of the statute. (A slip of the pen; mechanical error).

a. US v. Locke: act required land owners to file a claim on intention to hold the land  each year “prior to December 1st”. The appellees filed their notice ON December  31st, not prior. 

i. Can the statute be interpreted as allowing a Dec. 31st filing? No (harsh  result). This is not a scrivener’s errors case example.

2)  Absurd Results Doctrine: directs courts to avoid statutory interpretations that provide  absurd results. Courts apply this principle on the assumption that congress intends  statutes to have sensible effects or that statutes should have sensible effects, as a  normative matter.

a. An agency cannot invoke the doctrine to remedy absurdities of the agency’s own  making. When it is applied, it requires the courts to select the alternative statutory  construction that does the least violence to congress’s enacted text. 

18

b. The absurd results doctrine applies only when the absurdity in question is the  product of a statute’s unambiguous direction. When an interpretation of an  ambiguous text produces absurd results, then the court could simply go with the  other interpretation. 

c. Coalition for Responsibility Regulation of Industry v. EPA­ circuit upheld  doctrine of absurd results. Permitting a statute to be read to avoid absurd results  allows an agency to establish that seemingly clear statutory language does not  express the unambiguously expressed intent of Congress. However, the doctrine  of absurd results does not grant the agency a license to rewrite the statute. 

INTENT AND PURPOSE BASED TOOLS:

HIERARACHY OF LEGISLATIVE HISTORY

Parol Evidence Rule: when the document is clear or unambiguous, then you stick to the text  and do not use prior drafts. Compare parol evidence rule with our ability to use legislative  history. Always start with text. If there’s ambiguity, then look to all our canons. 

Is legislative history a supplemental tool? Some judges believe legislative history use is  inappropriate, all you need is the text. But some judges believe it can give us legislative purpose. 

What does it mean to say that a body with over 600 individuals has “intent”? It is a large group  that probably disagrees. So how do you determine what to give weight to? There is a hierarchy of legislative history. Different pieces of legislative history have different weights relative to one  another. These are the relative weight of the pieces on which courts most often rely: 

1)   Committee Reports: occupy the highest position in the hierarchy of legislative history.  Written by those who are charged with responsibility of the bill and who are best  informed about that bill. They circulate the bill to the whole chamber and are read by  legislative staff and member of congress. 

o   But are not always reliable because they are not subject to a vote by a full  chamber of congress and cannot be amended, so they do not reflect 

disagreements. 

o   The best committee report is the Conference Committee because it is the final  stage (the step after it becomes a law). Both houses are on the conference  committee, so it’s a larger group that should give you a more accurate view. Are  not as helpful because they only talk about what they disagree about. Usually  trumps the house and senate committee report.  

2)  Author or Sponsor Statements: reliable indication of legislative intent because it’s  prepared by an individual knowledgeable about the bill. Still is only one voice rather than the view of the whole chamber. 

19

3)  Member Statements: remarks of other members of congress may contain relevant  information. Losing side statement usually does not have much weight. 

4)  Hearing Records: committees that draft and debate bills in both the house and senate  frequently hold hearings on the bills. The record may include oral testimony, written  submissions of the report, as well as comments and questions from the members  themselves. But they are attended by just committee member, not the entire congress. 

5)  Other Legislative Statements: legislative history of other statutes, both from the past  and future, might serve as guides to the meaning of a word, provision, or the purpose of a statute, particularly if written close in time and treat the same subject. 

6)  Presidential and Agency Statements: president signed the bill into law, so is presumed  to have read the bill. In addition, the president may have participated in the drafting of the legislation and was advised as to the content of the bill. 

o   Why is he at the bottom? He’s an entirely separate branch and isn’t a part of  congress. He’s a necessary participant in passing a law, but doesn’t speak to  congressional intent. 

Judicial Reliance on Legislative History Cases:  

Moore v. Harris: facts­ Moore sought black lung benefits under a safety act. The secretary of  health denied his request because he had not been employed at the mine for 10 years (only 7).  However, he had been self­employed at his own mine, which when combined put him over the  10 year mark requirement. 

∙    Whether the statutory language allows the court to combine the time Moore spent in the  mines total ­Yes. 

o  “Miner” is an individual who was or is employed in a coal mine. Argument that  Congress didn’t intend there to be a clear distinction between self­employment  and being an employee. 

∙ What were the sources that the court looked to in this case? Statutory purpose: the statute  itself should say what its purpose is. Legislative History: alternated between “worked in”  and “employed in” in the senate committee report document. Looked at author statements and member statements. They used multiple sources to interpret the case. 

∙ This happened in 1972, but in 1978 the bill was amended and they changed the definition of miner. Under the new definition, it showed the intent of excluding self­employed  miners. 

o What does it mean when congress overrules what you said was the legal  principle? It probably means Congress thought the interpretation of the regulation  was wrong.

20

o What did the court say about the overruling? That the benefits were made clear  for all miners and that the statute was originally misinterpreted. Congress  misspoke when using the words interchangeably. 

Montana Wilderness Association v. US Forest Service: Facts­ Burlington wanted to build a road  across national forest land and US forest service granted them a permit. Burlington had a  property right to an area in the middle of the national forest and they wanted access to it  (landlocked). 

∙    The act in Alaska essentially protects this land, but if you build a road on it, you lose the  ability to protect that land. Does the federal statute apply to just Alaska or the entire US?  The court determines the provisions apply only to Alaska. 

o In pari materia­ if the two provisions are side by side, they’re meant to have the  same effect. Use of the words is meant to have a consistent meaning. “National  forest”. 

∙ Second Decision for the same case­ Court basically ended up reversing its decision and  withdrew it. Why 180 degree turn around? Subsequent act passed in the same congress  and did not contain national access language. So, they thought it should apply nationally. 

TOOLS FOR CHANGED CIRCUMSTANCES: 

DYNAMIC INTERPRETATION

Whenever a statute or law is “dynamic” it must be allowed to evolve as the courts change in economic knowledge and circumstances change. It is whenever parts of the legislation are open to interpretation; it is a flexible standard that is not based on strict Textualism, but able to change based on current court interpretation. Dynamic interpretation is also founded on the idea that the original legislative expectations should not always control statutory meaning. This is especially true when the statute is old and generally phrased and the societal or legal context of the statute has changed in material ways. 

Archaeological v. Nautical Interpretation:  

∙    Archaeological­ the meaning of a statute is set in stone on the date of its enactment, and  it is the interpreter’s task to uncover and reconstruct that original meaning. 

∙    Nautical­ understands a statute as an on­going process. Willingness to test the mores of  today. Non­originalism; Operating within the statute and interpreting it. Interpreters are  creators of meaning. 

o    Nautical interpretation is still text­based. 

Bob Jones University v. US: famous illustration of how courts will look to how history and  modern conditions have changed. School had discriminatory practices, so the IRS did not give 

21

them tax­exempt status. An overtly racist institution is also a university, so are they entitled to  tax exemption? No. 

Background: 501(c)(3) exempts institutions from taxes and IRS code sec 170 allows persons to  deduct certain “charitable contributions”. 501 does not include the word “charity” or mention  public policy. 

∙ These institutions did not meet the requirement by providing "beneficial and stabilizing  influences in community life" to be supported by taxpayers with a special tax status. The schools could not meet this requirement due to their discriminatory policies. The Court  declared that racial discrimination in education violated a "fundamental national public  policy."

∙ The government may justify a limitation on religious liberties by showing it is necessary  to accomplish an "overriding governmental interest." Prohibiting racial discrimination  was such a governmental interest. Hence, the Court found that "not all burdens on  religion are unconstitutional."

∙ Agency deference present: IRS was given the power to change their regulation and  update and adapt them to historical circumstance.

Tools that Justice Burger used to prove that the University should not be tax­exempt:  

∙    Plain Language: “prevention of cruelty to children”, “no attempting to influence  legislation”. 

∙    Congressional Purpose

o   In pari materia­ 170 parallels 501. Charitable contributions is not a blank slate or  a neutral term. Common Law: Concept of charitable contribution harkens back to  charitable institutions which was not dealing with tax law, but rather trusts.  Congress intentionally used a dynamic term (not meant to be fixed at one time,  but to grow with the times). “Charitable” also means it benefits society at large  and serves a desirable public purpose.  

o    What the other branches are doing in regards to this issue: there was broad  consensus among the federal branches. Numerous executive orders and 

fundamental policy of eliminating racial discrimination. 

o    Common law  dynamic language.  

Why not let congress fix it by changing the statute? 

∙    Burger said Congress’ failure to act indicated support for the IRS interpretation/change.  Congressional Inaction acquiesces with the IRS rulings. Also, bills to overturn the IRS 

22

interpretation never got past committee. Congress chose not to overrule the IRS  determination. 

∙    “Social Clubs”­ congress will not grant tax exempt status to others that are  discriminatory (golf clubs, Country clubs?). Determined that we should not use tax  benefits to support racism. Exclusio Unis: congress could have included other  organizations as well (universities), but didn’t. They meant what they didn’t say. (Since  universities were not explicitly excluded, maybe Bob Jones should have been tax  exempt). 

Rehnquist Dissent: they should be tax exempt­ he was concerned with the court legislating,  rather than interpreting. Congress could have narrowed the exclusions, like they did with social  clubs, but chose not to. The court should not tweak what Congress says. 

Leegin Creative Leather Products v. PSKS: Facts­ Leegin entered into vertical price fixing with  their retailers, requiring them to charge no less than certain minimum prices for their products.  PSKS sold the products at a discount and was dropped as a retailer, suffering losses. 

∙    PSKS argued from precedent­ mandatory minimum price agreements are per se illegal (the action without consideration for circumstance is illegal).

∙    Leegin argued for the Rule of Reason: only combinations and contracts unreasonably  restraining trade are subject to actions under the anti­trust laws. Possession of monopoly  power is not in itself illegal. Under the rule of reason, the circumstances in which the  action was committed must be considered. Price minimums would be held illegal only  where they are shown to be anticompetitive (case by case basis).  

∙    HELD­ Court determined that precedent should be overruled and vertical price  minimums are to be judged by the rule of reason. 

o Justice Kennedy focused on two things: 1) the Sherman act is different because  it’s a dynamic common law statute (def above). Parts of legislation are left  open. 2) To what extent the act allows per se action, case by case interpretation  is better. 

AGENCIES

What provisions of the US Constitution discuss the control or administration of federal  department or agencies? 

­ Article II­ presidential executive powers. Vests the power to execute the instructions of  Congress, which has the exclusive power to make laws. 

­ The Necessary and Proper Clause (Article I, Sec 8, Cl 18): “The Congress shall have  Power ... To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into 

23

Execution the foregoing Powers, and all other Powers vested by this Constitution in the  Government of the United States, or in any Department or Officer thereof.”

What is an Agency? A unit of government created by statute. Owes its existence, form, and  power to legislation. Federal agencies are established through federal legislation, but there can  also be state agencies. Agencies are not described in the constitution. Mentions “executive  departments”, which suggests they are under the president’s control. Agencies are not  “unconstitutional” simply because they are “extra­constitutional”.

(Ex­ Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Security, FEMA). 

What federal agency was not created by statute? The EPA was created by an executive order  (Nixon). Agencies can also include courts. Under a strict reading, the EPA is not an agency  because it was not created by statute. 

What are the benefits of agencies?  

∙    Expertise: seen as having expertise for solving the complex problems that confront  modern society. 

∙    Fairness and Rationality: guidance material, judicial review, and administrative  procedure. 

∙    Interest Representation: can enhance legitimacy through the legislative process. 

∙    Political Accountability: agencies can be seen as being accountable to the people,  indirectly, because the president monitors their actions. 

∙    Efficacy and Flexibility: capacity to respond quickly to changing circumstances. ∙    Coordination: coordinating policies with other agencies across government  ∙    Efficiency: regulations. 

What does an agency do (sphere of power)? 

Everything from education to regulations. There are probably 10 times as many regulations as  there are laws. Scope of activities are enormous. Ex­ issue guidance, investing (making decisions that can affect the economy), usually agencies have to step in and deal with problems first before congress will speak to the issue. 

“Notice and Comment” Rule Making: the way agencies open the door for making the  rules; it is a predictable process for issuing regulations. Anybody can comment on a rule that’s  been published in the federal registry. You don’t need standing, you just have to be capable of  writing a comment. The agency will respond to substantive comments. Actions of agencies can  be reviewed by federal courts under a substantive standard­ arbitrary and capricious review (the 

24

agency can get it wrong, but the court will not overturn the decision unless its sooo wrong). The  courts looks at comments and the record, don’t call witnesses. 

Process: 

1.   Agency issues a notice of proposed rulemaking, which contains one or more proposed  rules and is published in the federal register. 

2.   Provide a reasonable time for interested parties to submit written comments on the  proposed rule. Meant to replace an oral, trial­type hearing with a written one. 

3.   Agency completes the notice­and­comment rulemaking process by issuing a final rule.  The statement of “basis and purpose” must, at a minimum, set forth the rationale and  legal authority for the rule. 

If you have a particular statute, usually congress can have its own specific review standard for  that statute written into the provision. 

Who calls the shots? 

Organizations like agencies are usually not simple and have many layers of management.  Depends on what type of agency it is, Executive­Branch or Independent Agencies:

o    Executive Branch Agencies appear under the president in the governmental  organizational chart and are run by officials who can be fired at will by the President.  (Ex­ FEMA, EPA, Dept. of the interior, Dept. of Health).

o    Independent Agencies are different because their heads (can be several) serve fixed  terms that expire in staggered years and are removable by the president only “for  cause” or “good cause”. They are independent in the sense that their heads are not  subject to plenary presidential removal. Also, they are generally run by multi­member  commissions or boards rather than a single administrator. (Ex­ SEC, FCC, Federal  Reserve). 

∙   Why would you want an independent agency? More immune from political  pressure. 

∙    The Constitutionality of Independent Agencies: independent agencies  cannot be plausibly located in either the legislative or judicial branch because  they are more like the executive branch. (The problem is that the leaders are  not removable by the president at will, which led them to be called “the 

headless fourth branch” of our government”.) Separation of powers issue.  Agencies have both: 

    Civil Service Members: hired through a non­political process. More than 2 million, so  they greatly outnumber political appointees and outlast them.  

25

    Political Appointees: constitution requires some high­level officials to be appointed by  the President and confirmed by the senate. They occupy the top rung of leadership and  management within an agency and can dramatically shape the direction of the agency.  Serve at the pleasure of the executive branch. 

Free Enterprise Fund v. Public Company Accounting Oversight Board: P brought suit alleging  that the creation of the board violated the appointments clause because it derived the President  from exercising adequate control over the board (President could not directly fire board members and SEC could only fire the board members “for­cause”). 

∙   Violated the separation of powers­ congress could create the agency, but the executive  could not control or regulate it. Contradicts article II’s vesting of the executive power in  the president. Congress is taking power from Executive and giving it to an agency neither of them have control of. 

∙    Court rules this was an over delegation of power by Congress to the agency. SC struck  down an act of congress. 

∙    Take­away: focus on who calls the shots in an agency and the limits on congress’ ability  to insulate and protect the individuals who make those calls.

DELEGATION

Can you have a contract that is too vague to be enforced? 

Ex­ “anyone who restrains trade shall be liable for triple the damages caused by their  conduct”. Is this enough? Sometimes legislatures purposefully make broad rules/statutes and rely on agencies to interpret them according to the situation. Could a court hear a case relying only on this statute? Yes, it’s powerful to whoever can enforce it. Who can enforce it? FTC (federal trade commission), DOJ (department of justice). Basically, it lets the court fill in the blanks. By  leaving it broad and open, the legislature is delegating interpretation to whoever gets the case. 

What would lead congress to be specific or vague in some cases?  

∙    Perhaps don’t have the knowledge, time, or resources to be specific. (Ignorance of the  topic). 

∙    Claim benefit and not the cost (political self­interest), creating loop holes ∙    Distrust or shared delegation

(CONS): When Congress foregoes specificity, the result is a delegation of authority, but not  every delegation is explicit in the statute. What’s the cost of letting congress pass the ball?  Possible lack of accountability, vagueness used more often as a legislative tool is undemocratic.  The constitutional argument against delegation is that Congress is vested with legislative power  and cannot delegate that power to other institutions. 

26

Non­delegation doctrine: is the principle that the Congress of the United States, being  vested with "all legislative powers" by Article One, Section 1 of the United States Constitution,  cannot delegate that power to anyone else; there is a rule against laws that are too vague. Gives  limits as to how far congress can go in not being specific. 

∙ However, the Supreme Court has ruled that Congressional delegation of legislative  authority is an implied power of Congress that is constitutional so long as Congress  provides an "intelligible principle" to guide the executive branch

An “intelligible principle” is language in an operative provision of a statute that provides the  agency some guidance on its mission. 

∙ As between specificity and delegation, Congress frequently chooses delegation. The  Court has gone out of its way to uphold broad delegating statutes as long as they contain  an “intelligible principle” to constrain the agency. 

The Rule of Law Rationale: a system of objective and accessible commands, law which can be  seen to flow from collective agreement rather than from the exercise of discretion or preference  by those persons who happen to be in the positions of authority. The rule of law requires the  government to exercise its power in accordance with well­established and clearly written rules,  regulations, and legal principles.

Conditions where Congress will likely provide a greater degree of delegation to an executive  agency:  

­ controversial areas, 

­ when there’s more trust of delegating to others,

­ more complex and detailed it is the more willing congress is to let agencies run it,  ­ if the agency has more time and resources to commit to a certain problem,  ­ requires a lot of technical expertise to understand it. 

TOOLS OF STATUTORY IMPLEMENTATION

STEPS FOR RULE MAKING:  

Semi Annual Index­ purgatory; where the rule sits before it actually gets passed.  ANPR­ announced notice of proposed rule making 

NPR­ notice of proposed rulemaking (where the lawyer jumps in for the client and where  the agency takes comments­ if you don’t comment in the time frame, you lose your vote).

Data Availability­ library where you can go look at the documents 

27

SNPR­ supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking. (Gives fair notice of changes before publishing.)

Final­ where the record is set.

     **Texas also has administrative procedure with the same elements. One major difference:  Contested Case Hearing­ where you can request a court proceeding if you want to fight a  certain rule or decision. 

NHTSA example­ gov wanted car companies to improve gas mileage. Retroactivity deprived the  law of its statutory intent. Courts will assume things should not be dealt with retroactively unless the statute explicitly provided for it. 

How do agencies interpret statutes? 

Factors that agencies consider: 

∙    Statutory: the agency considers the authority that the statute grants and the instructions  that it provides to determine what actions are required and permitted; it often interprets  the language of its statute before applying that language, just as courts do. 

∙    Scientific: it examines the scientific data that the problem requires; it examines the  existing and potential technology for responding to risks. 

∙    Economic: it assesses the costs in relation to the benefits of different alternatives. 

∙    Political: considers other important aspects of the problem, like public attitudes and  political preferences, federal regulation, especially burdens on the domestic auto industry.

Note­ that all agencies do not perform all of these analyses for every regulation. 

Note­ that agencies must find a way to integrate these tools when making a decision. Regulations reflect all things considered judgments, not a series of isolated considerations. 

Statutory Analysis­ an agency must ensure that its regulations are a) within the scope of its  statute and b) consistent with the terms of its statute. 

o   1) Jurisdiction­ does this statute authorize this agency to reach a particular subject? 

o   Even if an agency has jurisdiction over a particular subject, it may only regulate that  subject in the manner the statute permits. 2) An agency may not rely on prohibited or  irrelevant statutory factors and it must consider mandatory or relevant statutory factors. 

Chevron USA Inc v. Natural Resources Defense Council Inc: landmark case that advocated  giving agencies deference for their reasonable policy­making decisions. 

28

∙    Background: Any major facility emits air pollutants in multiple places and ways. How do  you control the safety of these emissions? Clean Air Act required each area to have its  own permits (old school). New school­ didn’t view it as a bunch of emitters, but as one  big one which only needed one permit (the bubble). You had flexibility to lower and raise each emitter as long as you didn’t raise the collective level of pollution. This was a  radical departure from the way the clean air act had been understood before. EPA  allowed bubbling in this case. 

o   SC looked to: statutory language, ambiguous/absent congressional intent, silent  legislative history, flexibility of the legislation, and policy considerations (which  they said were for congress, not courts). Why congress was ambiguous does not  matter; all that matters is that power and authority was delegated to the agency. 

∙    STEP 1­ question whether congress has directly spoken to the precise question at  issue. (EPA’s authority to treat all pollution­emitting devices within the same industry  grouping as though within a single “bubble” based on the construction of the statutory  term “stationary source”). If it’s clear, then that’s the end of the matter. 

∙    STEP 2­ But if congress has not directly addressed the question, the court does not  simply impose its own construction on the statute, as would be necessary in the absence  of an administrative interpretation. (Deference to agencies where congress is silent or  ambiguous­ even where the court disagrees). 

o    The question for the court is whether the agency’s answer is based on a  permissible construction of the statute. 

o    Implicitly or explicitly delegate by Congress: if congress has explicitly left a gap for the agency to fill, there is an express delegation of authority to the agency to  elucidate a specific provision of the statute by regulation. Where it is implicit, a  court may not substitute its own construction of a statutory provision for a  reasonable interpretation made by the administrator of an agency. 

o    If an agency has adopted a regulation based on an interpretation of a statute  under step two of the chevron analysis, a federal court will overturn that  

interpretation if: congress improperly delegated legislative powers under article I  by allowing agency to implement the statute without an intelligible principle or if  agency’s regulation is arbitrary, capricious, or manifestly contrary to the purpose.

∙    PSD (prevention of significant deterioration­ where the air is clean and they’re trying to  keep it that way) or NSR (new source review­ use where the air is already dirty). NSR  requirements are more stringent. 

Assumptions with the chevron test­ what if an agency has to interpret a constitutional  requirement if it’s part of a regulatory framework (is there any deference given by the court?)

29

∙    No. The court would say that constitutional issues are their call and congress cannot give  that power to agencies. 

Does it have to be a regulation/rule; What about a circular or pamphlet (would a court give  informal lower tier deference)? 

∙    Court would defer only based on how much it looks like a regulation. MEAD AGENCIES AND ECONOMICS

The way a rule is conceived and grows inside the confines of the agency; how the agency thinks.  Agencies anticipate how others will respond. 

Tools Agencies Rely on: Economic, Political, and Scientific

∙    Most important fundamental tool is the Cost­Benefit Analysis. This is a decision  procedure, not a moral standard. It is a way of producing a full accounting; has spurred  governmental attention in serious problems and has led to regulations that accomplish  statutory goals at lower costs, or that do not devote limited private and public resources to areas where they are unlikely to do much good. What effect does this have on human  life? Do the number of lives saved justify the costs? 

∙    CBA­ Looks at the overall societal benefit of a rule (measure the statistical difference  between benefits and costs of a project).  Costs to the community of projects to establish  whether they are worthwhile. It is the regulatory engine; CBA is the dominant paradigm  that agencies use to determine economic outcome of rules. 

∙    Time is a factor­ Must discount the money you get now by what inflation will be in the  future. Money is worth more now than it is 10 years from now. What type of rule is most  likely to be effected (disfavorly skewed) by a high discount rate? A rule that takes  immediate effect, rules with uncertainty that are hard to give a number to­ hard to see the  benefits of environmental regulations (how much is clean air worth?), a rule where you  have to place a monetary value on something that has a moral component. 

∙    It is not required for an agency to consider “willingness to pay” methodology to  determine the value of a lost human life. 

OMB A4: what agencies have to look at when they are devising a rule and have to justify its  existence. Still have to list things that are not able to be monetized (separate list). This analysis  document should discuss the expected benefits and costs of the selected regulatory option and  any reasonable alternatives. 

∙    Ex­ Noah Act: 

30

o Schedule 1 (costs): federal funding and cost for the scientific research and  devices, implementation costs (permits and licensing­ agency costs), field tests  (what happens when you let the reintroduced animals back into the ecosystem), 

o Schedule 2 (benefits): estimated benefits in advances in technology and creation,  value of the animals, 

o Schedule 3 (moral issues). 

AGENCIES AND SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS

Scientific method/systematic approach (observable and testable­ controlled experiments), then  falsifiable­ possible to be disproven. Expecting to see transparency and peer review.   

Scientific tools that agencies use: 

1)   Risk Assessment: process for calculating probability and magnitude of negative effects.  (Ex­ crash test). Simply says what the risk is and what do we need to know about it. Ex­  public health and toxicology­ How it operates/byproducts. Risk Management­ decision  to take or withhold action. This is more policy and judgment based on the research done  in the risk assessment. Cost on society. 

a. Risk assessment and risk management is a two­step process which carries  different values.

b. Where are the flaws in risk? When there’s uncertainty (problem can’t be defined  or scientific analysis is imprecise or can change in the future/ there isn’t a single  answer) or ignorance (it might be there, but we don’t have all the data right now).

2)   Toxicology­ rat testing; biological hazard of a particular chemical or compound. Study of poisons, but isn’t positively accurate because they can’t test on humans and there can be  intervening causes. There are extrapolation issues. 

3)   Epidemiology­ looks at exposure in the field and then extrapolates from the exposure  where the effects are coming from. Trying to find correlation that is a reliable link.  Fundamental issues­ just because two things are close doesn’t mean one thing caused the  other. But it is a strong clue. 

4)   Statistical Analysis­ fastest growing tool; big data. A way to determine causal  relationships between two subsets within data. 

Potential way to solve problems:  

1)   Precautionary Approach­ playing it safe/rather safe than sorry. If the toxicology is  questionable, then take the bottom, the number you know will be protected. The blow 

31

back from this approach is that it can be really expensive or some things don’t have solid  data, so you can’t implement the policy. Safety factors can be wildly unrealistic and you  end up chasing phantom risks. 

a.   Ex­ children eating lead tainted soil 24 hours a day­ unrealistic test which leads to overprotection. They know there’s a risk, but it’s fuzzy and there’s a range, so  they pick the low end. 

b.   Review Question: Ex. of agency’s application of a precautionary approach when  generating scientific information in a risk assessment: the agency “stacks” risks by assuming the most conservative risk level for each step of a course of action,  so that the resulting overall risk (of exposure) is set at an extremely low level. 

2)   Open Ended Science­ if you’re trying to be precautionary, you can end up with rule  making proceedings that can last a long time. 

3)   Shifting Standard Science­ if something takes a long time, then the agency can  constantly change and build the science. The hamster wheel never stops (air condition  and changes in Houston). 

4)   Political Science­ selectively using science to support a political goal. Usually does not  contain the hall marks of falsifiability or peer review. 

Can Congress come in and tell agencies they have to use a specific scientific approach?  

∙    Nuclear Waste Act­ EPA had to do an assessment of the risk in where to put the waste.  EPA said 10,000 years is enough (use this number a lot) because the models they used  weren’t certain. Other agency said it had to be a million years (congress tried to tell the  EPA how to use the science). Congress can put their hands on the process. 

∙    What did the DC Circuit say in response to EPA’s decision? Rejected EPA’s choice  because congress can tell an agency how to get and account for the information and  opinion of the other agency. Court deemed that EPA failed to give due weight to the  other conclusion by the National Academy of Science that was required by congress. 

What did Obama’s 2009 memorandum on scientific integrity direct heads of executive  department and agencies to do? 1) Use scientific information in policy decisions subject to well established scientific processes, including peer review where appropriate. 2) Unless otherwise  restricted, make scientific findings available to the public. 

The Scientific Charade:  

Involves Agency Scientists (scientists fail to draw the line between science and policy,  either inadvertently or deliberately):

32

∙    Unintentional Charade­ agencies set a single, quantitative standard (usually they  continue indefinitely to look to science to resolve the trans­scientific questions).  Endless search for nonexistent scientific answers. Where bureaucrats inadvertently  characterize the standard­setting task as a problem for science. 

∙    Intentional Charade­ agency bureaucrats consciously disguise policy choices as  science. Typically occurs only after agency scientists have begun developing a  standard. 

      Involves agency political appointees (or officials within the white house):

∙    Premeditated Charade­ final agency approach to standard setting is to make a specific  policy choice, whether it is pro­industry or favors overprotection of public health and  the environment, and to introduce science only after the fact in order to  scientifically justify the predetermined standard.  

AGENCIES AND POLITICAL ANALYSIS

­     Public attitudes, distributional effects, and political preferences all fall into this category. 

­     Agencies consider how the public will react to a regulation and whom a regulation is likely to  effect. Fairness Concerns. 

­     Preferences of current officials are considered­ like the president and congress. 

­     Scientific or economic grounds for a decision are much more likely to be upheld than    political reasons. Try to leave political reasons out of the carving of the regulation and have  people bring them up later so you can turn them down. 

How the agency actually implements rules­ 1) formal adjudication, 2) comment­and­notice  rulemaking, and 3) guidance. 

(1) Formal Adjudication­ making a rule by trial; contested proceeding. Parties have a right to  present their position by oral or documentary evidence. Expert testimony may be used. Rules of  evidence do not apply, but can be used as a guideline. You can appeal within the agency (to the  head of the agency or an intermediate appeals board).

∙    In a formal adjudication to implement a statute, an agency: 1) must allow a party to  cross­examine witnesses as required for a full and true disclosure of facts, 2) typically will provide an administrative law judge to preside over an initial hearing, and 3)  must provide a statement of findings and conclusions along with the reason for the  decision.    

∙    Some consider formal adjudication as inferior to notice­and­comment rule making  because it is routinely retroactive (applying the new rule to the parties in the case)  and has fewer opportunities for public participation. The agency still decides in 

33

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here