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Towson - FORL 221 - Class Notes - Week 9

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Towson - FORL 221 - Class Notes - Week 9

School: Towson University
Department: Foreign Language
Course: British Literature to 1798
Professor: K. Attie
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: William Shakespeare King Lear Act 1 2 3
Name: Week 7 Notes
Description: Shakespeare's King Lear - Acts 1-3
Uploaded: 03/25/2016
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background image Shakespeare’s King Lear 1.        Style Rhetoric as an elaborate disguise/ruse Language of division Prose with a touch of rhyme
­ Kent’s rhyme (1259) to emphasize the words and slow the reader down
Language of Nothing
­ Note: nothing and noting were pronounced the same way during this time
Anachronism (something not matching the current time period)
­ Mentioning King Arthur
Doubling of plot: (treachery vs. loyalty)
­ Sons of Gloucester: Edmund and Edgar 
­ Daughters of King Lear: Goneril, Regan, and Cordelia
2. Language of Division Dividing love between husband and father
­ Regan and Goneril have husbands, but not Cordelia (1257)
Pre­Christian Britain vs. Shakespeare’s time
­ Traditional gods vs. God
­ Christian resonance in language
a. France: admires humble, poor, and virtuous people  holy richness despite  poverty b. BUT potential pagan nature/moral issue (because the moral and virtuous  Cordelia dies) Renaissance Lit. vs. Early Modern Lit. (1265)
­ Renaissance (Gloucester)
­ Early Modern (Edmund)
a. Skeptical, dismissive of traditional predictors of character (such as astrology  and bastardization versus legitimacy) 3.        King Lear    Social familial perception: Men have authority
­ Father = king = God (God is the father, father of the kingdom, kingdom of the 
castle­ dad) Wants the benefits of being a king without the power and burden
­ Divides the kingdom
a. Social background: King James (of unity) for uniting kingdoms b. Literary background: Shakespeare’s language of division suggests a more  tragic plot

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School: Towson University
Department: Foreign Language
Course: British Literature to 1798
Professor: K. Attie
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: William Shakespeare King Lear Act 1 2 3
Name: Week 7 Notes
Description: Shakespeare's King Lear - Acts 1-3
Uploaded: 03/25/2016
2 Pages 13 Views 10 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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