×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to KSU - FIN 26074 - Class Notes - Week 9
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to KSU - FIN 26074 - Class Notes - Week 9

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

KSU / Finance / FIN 26074 / What type of third-party beneficiary has no rights in the contract?

What type of third-party beneficiary has no rights in the contract?

What type of third-party beneficiary has no rights in the contract?

Description

School: Kent State University
Department: Finance
Course: Legal Environment of Business
Professor: Timothy ludick
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: FIN 26074, Legal Environment of business, Ludick, lecture 8, lecture 8 notes, october 28, 10/28, and Kent State University
Cost: 25
Name: FIN 26074- Lecture 8 notes (10/28)
Description: Notes from lecture 8 on October 28th. Finishing up contract law, but mostly about torts. The five different theories of torts and the concepts within them. TEST next week November 4th, study guide coming soon
Uploaded: 10/30/2015
12 Pages 118 Views 13 Unlocks
Reviews

Shulin Sun (Rating: )


Annie Roux (Rating: )


Andrew Schuster (Rating: )



FIN 26074­001 THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS­ Lecture 8 Notes (10/28) Exam 2 is next week­ November 4th! Will be posting study guide soon


What type of third-party beneficiary has no rights in the contract?



Third parties continued­ 

∙ Novation­ when there is a contract  and then one party wants to assign it to someone  else. All three parties have to agree. The assigner will step out, and the assignee will step  in. The party that assigned is no longer liable. 

∙ Third party beneficiary­ 3 types

1. Creditor beneficiary­ when there is an existing debt and a contract is entered in to. Creditor of that existing debt has a right in the contract that is being made.  2. Donee­ there is no preexisting debt. There is a desire to confirm a gift. The donor  enters to facilitate the future gift. The donee intended beneficiary of contract.  Typical example: life insurance. “upon my death give money here” 

(donating their money after they die to a cause, or giving to someone in 


What is tort?



particular)

3. Incidental beneficiary­ no rights in the contract. No intent for benefit upon  them. They don’t have any rights in this situation. Don't forget about the age old question of What is considered the skin of the earth?

Other things in contract law

∙ Performance­ there doesn’t have to be perfect performance, only has to be substantial  performace. 

o If there is a unique or special/personal skill then ACTUAL satisfaction is  required. 

∙ Conditions

o Concurrent conditions­ contract law presumes that when one party performs,  obligation for other party to perform, too. Perform and pay.

o Condition precedent­ when contract presumes a FUTURE event. When and  ONLY when that occurs, is there an obligation to perform. Initiates obligation to perform.

 When a lawyer tells someone “I will represent you when you get a DUI”  So when and only if that does happen, then the lawyer will represent 


What are the circumstances of invasion of privacy?



If you want to learn more check out Which hemisphere region is responsible for motor function, responsible for higher thinking, planning, abstract thinking?

(perform). 

o Condition subsequent­ cut off point for performance. When no longer need to  perform. Stops obligation to perform.

 When someone is tutoring you for a math test and then you take the test  and pass, the tutor no longer needs to tutor you for that test. 

∙ Remedies

o Contemporary damages­ court has to figure out consequence from breach in  monetary consequence.

o Monetary award­ contemplates a future loss/breach­ written contract. Remedy is  that court gives liquidated damages. They only become liable for a certain  amount.

o Punitive damages­ punishment. The purpose of this “remedy” is to punish the  wrongdoer. In Ohio and most other states, this is not awardable in contract cases  and is not considered a remedy. 

o Another concept under remedies is the concept of mitigation.

 This concept obligates an innocent party to act as a reasonable person  would, to minimize or lessen their damages/consequences. If they don’t  mitigate then the court may not award them.

Torts___ 

Tort means a civil wrong. Tort law is about civil wrongs that result in damage to someone’s  property and/or result to physical injury. There are 5 tort theories. We also discuss several other topics like Who marries and when?

1. (First theory) Intentional torts­intent to cause damage or harm to someone or their  property. The desire to purposefully do an act. Types of intentional torts:

∙ Intentional tort of ASSAULT­ intentional act to cause someone else to have  fear that they or an immediate family member will be harmed. If ANY kind of  fear APPREHENSION is caused then it is considered an assault. It doesn’t have  to be with the use of a weapon. We also discuss several other topics like What is the degree to which an assessment tool produces stable and consistent results?

o If someone holds you at gunpoint, you are afraid, that is assault. If 

someone who looks threatening to you holds a fist up to you that is 

assault. They are intending you to feel fear, but do not actually pull the  trigger.

∙ Battery­ different from assault! Battery is unpermitted physical contact with  someone else that causes injury or discomfort. It doesn’t necessarily have to be  violent. It is ANY unpermitted physical contact. 

o Guys groping a girl at a bar, considered battery if the women feels 

uncomfortable. If you were going in for a surgery to have something 

removed, but they removed something else by accident, that is considered  battery because you signed to have a specific part removed. You didn’t 

give permission for something else. 

∙ Intention of mental distress­ intends to cause someone psychological trauma.  Psychological or emotional upset. Some conduct that causes an emotional  response. 

∙ Invasion of privacy. 3 circumstances

o1. Intrusion upon a person’s solitude. If something you expect to have  privacy with is intruded upon. Invasion can happen directly or 

electronically. 

o2. Public disclosure of a private fact. All of us have secrets or things that have happened in past that we don’t want the world to know about. Even  though it may be true it’s an invasion of privacy. In the medical field, must be very careful with patient records. That is all private.  If you want to learn more check out What is a hypothesis test?

o3. Appropriating one’s name for financial gain without consent.  Someone can’t just use your name or someone else’s name to advertise.  Even if it were Lebron James, or someone famous. Must have consent.  ∙ False arrest or false imprisonment

o Neither of these require an arrest or putting someone in jail. 

oIf someone’s freedom has been taken away. Locking the doors and not  allowing anyone to leave.  We also discuss several other topics like What are the types of predators?

∙ Malicious prosecution­ there is a criminal charge that has been improperly  prosecuted. Purposely used justice system to get at someone. Prosecuted without  probable cause and with malice. 

∙ Abusive process (concept related to malicious prosecution) ­ when a party files a  civil lawsuit that has no merit. 

∙ Trespass­ intentional entering or remaining on someone’s real estate/property  without permission

∙ Conversion­ retaining someone’s personal property without permission  (stealing), or keeping something too long that was rented out. 

∙ Defamation­ 2 types

 Slander­ oral defamation

 Libel­ written or electronic defamation

oIn either case, communication has occurred about someone else that is  FALSE. Causes a third party to change their minds about that person. It is  an attack on a person about their character. 

oSpecial rules regarding defamation

 Public or government officials­ the public is allowed to know  about them. They want to know who they are voting for, for 

example. The media is not liable for defamatory untruths they print about them unless the person can prove that the untruths were 

published with malice (the deliberate intent to injure or bring 

down, evil)

 public figures, celebrity status­ Media is not liable unless proved to be published with reckless disregard for the truth. 

 Private citizens (like me and you)­ we have the most protection  under law. If something is communicated false it is libel because  negligence and carelessness.

∙ Fraud­ induces someone to enter into a contract under false pretenses.  ∙ Business intentional torts

oTrademark infringement­ companies have names and logos that cannot  be translated by anyone. This law is a registration. Register the name or  logo to protect it so that other people cannot use it. Examples include 

something like the Nike swoosh. 

oPatent infringements­ protects the owner or inventor. The person is  registered that it is their invention. When properly registered the inventor  has 20 year protection on their invention.

 If an invention occurs during company time with the company’s 

materials the employer has the right to use it. 

o Copyright infringement­ protects people like authors, artists, media  creators (books, movies, songwriters, etc.). This protects the unique  creation for the rest of the creator’s life plus 70 years after their death. Fair use can occur when someone uses it for an educational purpose, not for  money or their own personal gain. 

oTrade secrets­ secret formulas or recipes, customer lists, or other business secrets they don’t want competitors to have. 

oLuxurious falsehood­ modern day defamation of a business.

o Contractual interference­ contract that someone has interfered with. 

∙ Defenses to intentional torts

oSelf­defense­ applicable in some of intentional torts. If they believe that  themselves or a family member is in harm’s way. 

oStand your ground defense (only in some states) Ohio has stand your  ground CASTLE defense for residence or motor vehicle.

  If you are in your home or car and someone intrudes or trespasses  and you believe that you or a family are at risk of harm or death 

then you have the right to use force. Any force, even very strong, 

deadly force. It is called the CASTLE defense because it doesn’t 

work on property, it’s only in your home, your “castle”, or car. 

 The stand your ground rule in some other states apply this law 

anywhere, like if the trespasser is in your yard you CAN use force. 

oShopkeepers arrest­ if person commits offense. This is when a store or  shopkeeper can detain a thief and call the cops and then let the cops take it from there. The cops have to get there within a certain time though. 

2. (Second theory)­ Strict liability torts­ unlike intentional torts we don’t care about intent here at all. This is by state. States have defined certain kinds of conduct that are ultra hazardous which triggers automatic liability. In Ohio:

∙ Explosives­ no matter how careful someone is, if someone or property is harmed  there is liability to whoever was setting off the explosives. This applies to  fireworks as well. 

∙ Nuclear chemicals­ in earth or waste. Anytime dealing with nuclear material. If  there is a spill, there is automatic liability to anyone who was in process of getting rid of them.

∙ Dram shop law­ if a liquor establishment sells liquor to someone who is already  intoxicated and that person harms themselves or someone else when they are  intoxicated, the establishment is liable. Simple rule is: Don’t serve a drunk! 

∙ Wild animals­ if you have a wild animal and they get out and they harm someone else, you are liable. In Ohio, this applies to our pets, our domesticated cats and  dogs. 

∙ Respondeat superior­ when an employee injures someone else negligently,  employer is liable because worker is working for them. 

oExample: pizza delivery guy hits someone while delivering a pizza, 

automatic liability goes to employer

3. (Third theory) Negligence law­ applies to careless or negligent behavior that causes  harm to someone else or someone else’s property. This theory does NOT require ultra hazardous conduct, it does not look at intent. When something happens accidentally.  Most common type is a car accident. This law seeks to compensate someone because of  carelessness of someone else. 

∙ 4 elements of  negligence

o Duty­ Requires party to act in a careful manner. A private citizen does  not have an obligation to save or rescue someone. But a lifeguard or 

paramedic, for example, does have that obligation when they are on the  clock, whatever the risk is.

 A police officer has an obligation to enforce the law at all times 

though, even off the clock. 

o Breach of duty­ Showing that some standard of conduct has not been  met. Besides showing violation of a specific law, just unreasonable 

behavior for. Uses the reasonable person test­ “would a reasonable person  do this?”

 Establishing liability­ injury to someone who is injured on 

someone else’s real estate. Even if owner of real estate is not aware

of risk.

a. Business invitee­ Example­ if a jar shatters at a grocery 

store and no employee knows about it, and someone else 

ends up falling and cutting themselves on the glass, the 

store is still liable. It is the store’s job to find out about the 

jar. 

b. Social guest­ when someone has a guest at their house, they

need to be warned about any risks in the house

c. Trespasser­ only liable for artificial traps. For example, you

need to act as a reasonable person and put a fence around 

the pool, so someone doesn’t drown in the pool because 

they didn’t know it was there. 

o Proximate cause­ requires that there be approximation in fact. They have to show that harm was a foreseeable harm from conduct. Showing that this is the kind of risk that could happen from harm. 

o Damages­ compensate person for loss. Money is really the only 

“alternative” for a death or injury since you cannot change it. 

4. (Fourth Theory)­ strict product liability

∙ Whenever someone is in the business of buying making or selling in the market  place and there is a defect that causes harm, when there is a defect in the  marketplace. Like the recent car company and their recalls in the cars. Liability  in company.

o Defenses­

 Contributory negligence­ if the person was using the product 

carelessly. 

 Defense of statement of “state of art”­ if the item was made back in the day in the 80’s for example, they ask what the engineering 

was like then. They don’t look at it in today’s time

 Comparative negligence­ compare faults of both parties. 

5. (Fifth Theory) No fault­ tort theory that doesn’t require fault

∙ Like complex insurance systems. All parties paid in advance. In Ohio examples  include things like unemployment money, workers compensation, disability,  Invest money so that when there is a loss they can pay up.

FIN 26074­001 THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF BUSINESS­ Lecture 8 Notes (10/28) Exam 2 is next week­ November 4th! Will be posting study guide soon

Third parties continued­ 

∙ Novation­ when there is a contract  and then one party wants to assign it to someone  else. All three parties have to agree. The assigner will step out, and the assignee will step  in. The party that assigned is no longer liable. 

∙ Third party beneficiary­ 3 types

1. Creditor beneficiary­ when there is an existing debt and a contract is entered in to. Creditor of that existing debt has a right in the contract that is being made.  2. Donee­ there is no preexisting debt. There is a desire to confirm a gift. The donor  enters to facilitate the future gift. The donee intended beneficiary of contract.  Typical example: life insurance. “upon my death give money here” 

(donating their money after they die to a cause, or giving to someone in 

particular)

3. Incidental beneficiary­ no rights in the contract. No intent for benefit upon  them. They don’t have any rights in this situation.

Other things in contract law

∙ Performance­ there doesn’t have to be perfect performance, only has to be substantial  performace. 

o If there is a unique or special/personal skill then ACTUAL satisfaction is  required. 

∙ Conditions

o Concurrent conditions­ contract law presumes that when one party performs,  obligation for other party to perform, too. Perform and pay.

o Condition precedent­ when contract presumes a FUTURE event. When and  ONLY when that occurs, is there an obligation to perform. Initiates obligation to perform.

 When a lawyer tells someone “I will represent you when you get a DUI”  So when and only if that does happen, then the lawyer will represent 

(perform). 

o Condition subsequent­ cut off point for performance. When no longer need to  perform. Stops obligation to perform.

 When someone is tutoring you for a math test and then you take the test  and pass, the tutor no longer needs to tutor you for that test. 

∙ Remedies

o Contemporary damages­ court has to figure out consequence from breach in  monetary consequence.

o Monetary award­ contemplates a future loss/breach­ written contract. Remedy is  that court gives liquidated damages. They only become liable for a certain  amount.

o Punitive damages­ punishment. The purpose of this “remedy” is to punish the  wrongdoer. In Ohio and most other states, this is not awardable in contract cases  and is not considered a remedy. 

o Another concept under remedies is the concept of mitigation.

 This concept obligates an innocent party to act as a reasonable person  would, to minimize or lessen their damages/consequences. If they don’t  mitigate then the court may not award them.

Torts___ 

Tort means a civil wrong. Tort law is about civil wrongs that result in damage to someone’s  property and/or result to physical injury. There are 5 tort theories.

1. (First theory) Intentional torts­intent to cause damage or harm to someone or their  property. The desire to purposefully do an act. Types of intentional torts:

∙ Intentional tort of ASSAULT­ intentional act to cause someone else to have  fear that they or an immediate family member will be harmed. If ANY kind of  fear APPREHENSION is caused then it is considered an assault. It doesn’t have  to be with the use of a weapon.

o If someone holds you at gunpoint, you are afraid, that is assault. If 

someone who looks threatening to you holds a fist up to you that is 

assault. They are intending you to feel fear, but do not actually pull the  trigger.

∙ Battery­ different from assault! Battery is unpermitted physical contact with  someone else that causes injury or discomfort. It doesn’t necessarily have to be  violent. It is ANY unpermitted physical contact. 

o Guys groping a girl at a bar, considered battery if the women feels 

uncomfortable. If you were going in for a surgery to have something 

removed, but they removed something else by accident, that is considered  battery because you signed to have a specific part removed. You didn’t 

give permission for something else. 

∙ Intention of mental distress­ intends to cause someone psychological trauma.  Psychological or emotional upset. Some conduct that causes an emotional  response. 

∙ Invasion of privacy. 3 circumstances

o1. Intrusion upon a person’s solitude. If something you expect to have  privacy with is intruded upon. Invasion can happen directly or 

electronically. 

o2. Public disclosure of a private fact. All of us have secrets or things that have happened in past that we don’t want the world to know about. Even  though it may be true it’s an invasion of privacy. In the medical field, must be very careful with patient records. That is all private. 

o3. Appropriating one’s name for financial gain without consent.  Someone can’t just use your name or someone else’s name to advertise.  Even if it were Lebron James, or someone famous. Must have consent.  ∙ False arrest or false imprisonment

o Neither of these require an arrest or putting someone in jail. 

oIf someone’s freedom has been taken away. Locking the doors and not  allowing anyone to leave. 

∙ Malicious prosecution­ there is a criminal charge that has been improperly  prosecuted. Purposely used justice system to get at someone. Prosecuted without  probable cause and with malice. 

∙ Abusive process (concept related to malicious prosecution) ­ when a party files a  civil lawsuit that has no merit. 

∙ Trespass­ intentional entering or remaining on someone’s real estate/property  without permission

∙ Conversion­ retaining someone’s personal property without permission  (stealing), or keeping something too long that was rented out. 

∙ Defamation­ 2 types

 Slander­ oral defamation

 Libel­ written or electronic defamation

oIn either case, communication has occurred about someone else that is  FALSE. Causes a third party to change their minds about that person. It is  an attack on a person about their character. 

oSpecial rules regarding defamation

 Public or government officials­ the public is allowed to know  about them. They want to know who they are voting for, for 

example. The media is not liable for defamatory untruths they print about them unless the person can prove that the untruths were 

published with malice (the deliberate intent to injure or bring 

down, evil)

 public figures, celebrity status­ Media is not liable unless proved to be published with reckless disregard for the truth. 

 Private citizens (like me and you)­ we have the most protection  under law. If something is communicated false it is libel because  negligence and carelessness.

∙ Fraud­ induces someone to enter into a contract under false pretenses.  ∙ Business intentional torts

oTrademark infringement­ companies have names and logos that cannot  be translated by anyone. This law is a registration. Register the name or  logo to protect it so that other people cannot use it. Examples include 

something like the Nike swoosh. 

oPatent infringements­ protects the owner or inventor. The person is  registered that it is their invention. When properly registered the inventor  has 20 year protection on their invention.

 If an invention occurs during company time with the company’s 

materials the employer has the right to use it. 

o Copyright infringement­ protects people like authors, artists, media  creators (books, movies, songwriters, etc.). This protects the unique  creation for the rest of the creator’s life plus 70 years after their death. Fair use can occur when someone uses it for an educational purpose, not for  money or their own personal gain. 

oTrade secrets­ secret formulas or recipes, customer lists, or other business secrets they don’t want competitors to have. 

oLuxurious falsehood­ modern day defamation of a business.

o Contractual interference­ contract that someone has interfered with. 

∙ Defenses to intentional torts

oSelf­defense­ applicable in some of intentional torts. If they believe that  themselves or a family member is in harm’s way. 

oStand your ground defense (only in some states) Ohio has stand your  ground CASTLE defense for residence or motor vehicle.

  If you are in your home or car and someone intrudes or trespasses  and you believe that you or a family are at risk of harm or death 

then you have the right to use force. Any force, even very strong, 

deadly force. It is called the CASTLE defense because it doesn’t 

work on property, it’s only in your home, your “castle”, or car. 

 The stand your ground rule in some other states apply this law 

anywhere, like if the trespasser is in your yard you CAN use force. 

oShopkeepers arrest­ if person commits offense. This is when a store or  shopkeeper can detain a thief and call the cops and then let the cops take it from there. The cops have to get there within a certain time though. 

2. (Second theory)­ Strict liability torts­ unlike intentional torts we don’t care about intent here at all. This is by state. States have defined certain kinds of conduct that are ultra hazardous which triggers automatic liability. In Ohio:

∙ Explosives­ no matter how careful someone is, if someone or property is harmed  there is liability to whoever was setting off the explosives. This applies to  fireworks as well. 

∙ Nuclear chemicals­ in earth or waste. Anytime dealing with nuclear material. If  there is a spill, there is automatic liability to anyone who was in process of getting rid of them.

∙ Dram shop law­ if a liquor establishment sells liquor to someone who is already  intoxicated and that person harms themselves or someone else when they are  intoxicated, the establishment is liable. Simple rule is: Don’t serve a drunk! 

∙ Wild animals­ if you have a wild animal and they get out and they harm someone else, you are liable. In Ohio, this applies to our pets, our domesticated cats and  dogs. 

∙ Respondeat superior­ when an employee injures someone else negligently,  employer is liable because worker is working for them. 

oExample: pizza delivery guy hits someone while delivering a pizza, 

automatic liability goes to employer

3. (Third theory) Negligence law­ applies to careless or negligent behavior that causes  harm to someone else or someone else’s property. This theory does NOT require ultra hazardous conduct, it does not look at intent. When something happens accidentally.  Most common type is a car accident. This law seeks to compensate someone because of  carelessness of someone else. 

∙ 4 elements of  negligence

o Duty­ Requires party to act in a careful manner. A private citizen does  not have an obligation to save or rescue someone. But a lifeguard or 

paramedic, for example, does have that obligation when they are on the  clock, whatever the risk is.

 A police officer has an obligation to enforce the law at all times 

though, even off the clock. 

o Breach of duty­ Showing that some standard of conduct has not been  met. Besides showing violation of a specific law, just unreasonable 

behavior for. Uses the reasonable person test­ “would a reasonable person  do this?”

 Establishing liability­ injury to someone who is injured on 

someone else’s real estate. Even if owner of real estate is not aware

of risk.

a. Business invitee­ Example­ if a jar shatters at a grocery 

store and no employee knows about it, and someone else 

ends up falling and cutting themselves on the glass, the 

store is still liable. It is the store’s job to find out about the 

jar. 

b. Social guest­ when someone has a guest at their house, they

need to be warned about any risks in the house

c. Trespasser­ only liable for artificial traps. For example, you

need to act as a reasonable person and put a fence around 

the pool, so someone doesn’t drown in the pool because 

they didn’t know it was there. 

o Proximate cause­ requires that there be approximation in fact. They have to show that harm was a foreseeable harm from conduct. Showing that this is the kind of risk that could happen from harm. 

o Damages­ compensate person for loss. Money is really the only 

“alternative” for a death or injury since you cannot change it. 

4. (Fourth Theory)­ strict product liability

∙ Whenever someone is in the business of buying making or selling in the market  place and there is a defect that causes harm, when there is a defect in the  marketplace. Like the recent car company and their recalls in the cars. Liability  in company.

o Defenses­

 Contributory negligence­ if the person was using the product 

carelessly. 

 Defense of statement of “state of art”­ if the item was made back in the day in the 80’s for example, they ask what the engineering 

was like then. They don’t look at it in today’s time

 Comparative negligence­ compare faults of both parties. 

5. (Fifth Theory) No fault­ tort theory that doesn’t require fault

∙ Like complex insurance systems. All parties paid in advance. In Ohio examples  include things like unemployment money, workers compensation, disability,  Invest money so that when there is a loss they can pay up.

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here