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UO / family and human services / FHS 213 / Do abused parents become abusers?

Do abused parents become abusers?

Do abused parents become abusers?

Description

School: University of Oregon
Department: family and human services
Course: Issues for Children and Families
Professor: Kevin alltucker
Term: Winter 2015
Tags:
Cost: 25
Name: Week 3 Notes
Description: Week 3 class notes (No class on Monday): The Development of Antisocial Behavior; The Case of Khrystal.
Uploaded: 01/23/2015
8 Pages 95 Views 1 Unlocks
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[[ 1/21/15 ]]


Do abused parents become abusers?



The Development of Antisocial Behavior

Theme of the Day… “The term Antisocial Behavior is used to describe a  manifestation of negative behaviors that begin early in life and continue into  adolescence and adulthood” “There is evidence that prenatal risk factors can  affect a child’s temperament, which can start the ball rolling for antisocial  behavior. In early childhood, the family is the training ground for antisocial  behavior.” Antisocial behavior is highly correlated with childhood  development.

Robin Karr-Morse – Ghosts from the Nursery

• One of the first to suggest that early childhood experiences were  related to future violence

• Violence begins in the womb

• “Assortative mating” = birds of a feather flock together; people of  similar behaviors/world views end up together… if 2 antisocial  people have a baby there is a high likelihood the child will be the  same


What happens if you drink before you know you're pregnant?



The Case of Khrystal

• Livermore, CA

• Born in 1975; youngest of 4 with 3 older brothers; dad worked part  time, was in & out of the picture; family is low-income

• Rented a 2 bedroom house with bad temperatures

• Fussy baby – inconsolable

• Mom had little patience for the unwanted child… didn’t even know  she was pregnant until about 4 months in. had been drinking. • Left Khrystal with a neighbor and her brother

• Mom brought the kids home and started drinking, would pass out  on the couch; brother would cook dinner

• Brother playing “doctor” with Khrystal; Mom spanked brother and  screamed and yelled (her usual disciplinary behavior); eventually  brother starts to fight back until mom gives up 


How do you resolve parent/child conflict?



We also discuss several other topics like What is the most typical vaulting type during the high gothic period?

• Escalation of conflict; parent doesn’t know how to solve conflict so  they give up, teaching the child how to be coercive If you want to learn more check out You perform a cross between a heterozygous tall pea plant and a homozygous short pea plant and obtain 30 tall plants and 20 short plants in the f1 generation. assuming standard mendelian inheritance of this character, how many tall and short plants would

• Khrystal was skilled in getting what she wanted through these  coercive manners; by 1st grade she had witnessed domestic  violence between mom and dad, police responses, CPS

investigation, her brother arrested at age 11 for killing the  neighbor’s cat

• Khrystal was very smart; she figured out how to control her  classmates… transferred problem behaviors from home into the  classroom (cut in line, take your stuff because she wanted it) 

• By 5th grade she was placed in a special education class due to her  externalized behaviors; parents were unwilling to help; teachers  and students did not like her If you want to learn more check out What are the three aspects of the industrial revolution?

• In Junior High Khrystal found other girls with similar behaviors (pack mentality); grades plummeted, began experimenting with  drugs and alcohol

• Relational Bullying: not physical altercations, but emotional or  mental bullying; excluding others; unkind to members of own  group; competition – incredibly important in the antisocial  development of girls

• In 8th grade Khrystal was suspended for being drunk at school • High School: Mom was drunk all the time; Khrstal was able to not  go to school, do a lot of drugs, shoplift, engage in risky sexual  behaviors, etc. Deviant peer group!!! ☹ We also discuss several other topics like What exactly is inequality?

• Khrystal ever graduated from high school. She hooked up with Joel:  lots of violence and drugs. She moved in with him. She tried  methamphetamine. Joel was a small-time meth dealer. If you want to learn more check out What is rosenburg model?

• Relationship ended; to keep meth habit she fell in with another  dealer who gave her a place to live and drugs in exchange for sex;  she relied on meth sex and burglary to support her.

• First violent act- stabbed a woman in the arm while high on meth;  she went to juvenile hall

• 5 years later she stabbed another woman and went to prison for 5  years

• 4 stages of development of antisocial behavior

• Much less successful in relationships, employment, education,  independence, etc.

Prenatal risk factors: drug and alcohol use, stress, violence, neglect, abuse,  malnutrition, poor prenatal care

• Affects early brain development

o Human brain has more neurons than stars in the galaxy

o Neurons form at 250k per minute at 4 weeks after conception o Brain continues developing until age 25 and goes through the  neural pruning process Don't forget about the age old question of What does protestantism do?

▪ Pruning gets rid of unused neuron connections; depends  on experiences; gets rid of the things we don’t “need”

▪ Some experts describe neural pruning as “use it or lose  it”. The neural pathways that are used consistently are  

reinforced. Neural pathways not used are “pruned”  

away. Chronic stress in young children can reinforce  

flight or fight neural pathways to the detriment of other  

skill.

Child abuse can trigger elevated and chronic stress response in young  children. Can result in long-term changes in emotional behavior and  cognitive function. Children living in abusive and neglectful environments  have high stress for longer amounts of time. Brains are different. Oregon Primate Center – Studying the Effects of Maternal Bonding

• Judy Cameron... Separating baby monkeys from their mothers • Group 1: removed from mothers at birth

o Did not know how to be social; tried harder to be social;  scared other monkey babies; lead to Aggressive Behavior by  Group 1 Monkey babies

• Group 2: removed form mothers after 2 weeks

• Group 3: weaned normally at 6 weeks

Important Family Dynamics

• Parents “train” child to have antisocial behaviors

• Why would parents do this?

o They don’t know how to be a positive role model

• Patterson studied 206 4th grade boys who exhibited problem  behaviors in school; nearly 50% were arrested by age 14; 75% of  those went on to be career criminals

o Being arrested by age 14 is the most important predictive  event for criminal behavior – “Early Starters”

▪ Coercive family relation ships; harsh and inconsistent  

punishment; school failure; deviant peer groups

▪ 2-3x more likely to become career criminals

o Arrested after age 14 – “Late Starters”

▪ Respond to treatment; multiple support systems;  

typically grow out of delinquency

Prenatal Factors… Temperament … Low Attachment / Bonding Coercive family processes… Harsh and Inconsistent punishment… girls:  victimization

Early Start Delinquency… Delinquent Peer Group

Leve & Chamberlain 2002… Victimization: most violent girls have been  victimized

• Relational aggression: relational aggression was not being  measured

• Family criminality and family transitions: led to early start  delinquency that led to risky sexual behavior

• Most interventions geared for boys: ES girls have different needs  than ES boys

• Evidence that girls are detained more for similar crimes compared  to boys: strong evidence that more detention results in worse  outcomes

[[ 1/21/15 ]]

The Development of Antisocial Behavior

Theme of the Day… “The term Antisocial Behavior is used to describe a  manifestation of negative behaviors that begin early in life and continue into  adolescence and adulthood” “There is evidence that prenatal risk factors can  affect a child’s temperament, which can start the ball rolling for antisocial  behavior. In early childhood, the family is the training ground for antisocial  behavior.” Antisocial behavior is highly correlated with childhood  development.

Robin Karr-Morse – Ghosts from the Nursery

• One of the first to suggest that early childhood experiences were  related to future violence

• Violence begins in the womb

• “Assortative mating” = birds of a feather flock together; people of  similar behaviors/world views end up together… if 2 antisocial  people have a baby there is a high likelihood the child will be the  same

The Case of Khrystal

• Livermore, CA

• Born in 1975; youngest of 4 with 3 older brothers; dad worked part  time, was in & out of the picture; family is low-income

• Rented a 2 bedroom house with bad temperatures

• Fussy baby – inconsolable

• Mom had little patience for the unwanted child… didn’t even know  she was pregnant until about 4 months in. had been drinking. • Left Khrystal with a neighbor and her brother

• Mom brought the kids home and started drinking, would pass out  on the couch; brother would cook dinner

• Brother playing “doctor” with Khrystal; Mom spanked brother and  screamed and yelled (her usual disciplinary behavior); eventually  brother starts to fight back until mom gives up 

• Escalation of conflict; parent doesn’t know how to solve conflict so  they give up, teaching the child how to be coercive 

• Khrystal was skilled in getting what she wanted through these  coercive manners; by 1st grade she had witnessed domestic  violence between mom and dad, police responses, CPS

investigation, her brother arrested at age 11 for killing the  neighbor’s cat

• Khrystal was very smart; she figured out how to control her  classmates… transferred problem behaviors from home into the  classroom (cut in line, take your stuff because she wanted it) 

• By 5th grade she was placed in a special education class due to her  externalized behaviors; parents were unwilling to help; teachers  and students did not like her 

• In Junior High Khrystal found other girls with similar behaviors (pack mentality); grades plummeted, began experimenting with  drugs and alcohol

• Relational Bullying: not physical altercations, but emotional or  mental bullying; excluding others; unkind to members of own  group; competition – incredibly important in the antisocial  development of girls

• In 8th grade Khrystal was suspended for being drunk at school • High School: Mom was drunk all the time; Khrstal was able to not  go to school, do a lot of drugs, shoplift, engage in risky sexual  behaviors, etc. Deviant peer group!!! ☹ 

• Khrystal ever graduated from high school. She hooked up with Joel:  lots of violence and drugs. She moved in with him. She tried  methamphetamine. Joel was a small-time meth dealer.

• Relationship ended; to keep meth habit she fell in with another  dealer who gave her a place to live and drugs in exchange for sex;  she relied on meth sex and burglary to support her.

• First violent act- stabbed a woman in the arm while high on meth;  she went to juvenile hall

• 5 years later she stabbed another woman and went to prison for 5  years

• 4 stages of development of antisocial behavior

• Much less successful in relationships, employment, education,  independence, etc.

Prenatal risk factors: drug and alcohol use, stress, violence, neglect, abuse,  malnutrition, poor prenatal care

• Affects early brain development

o Human brain has more neurons than stars in the galaxy

o Neurons form at 250k per minute at 4 weeks after conception o Brain continues developing until age 25 and goes through the  neural pruning process

▪ Pruning gets rid of unused neuron connections; depends  on experiences; gets rid of the things we don’t “need”

▪ Some experts describe neural pruning as “use it or lose  it”. The neural pathways that are used consistently are  

reinforced. Neural pathways not used are “pruned”  

away. Chronic stress in young children can reinforce  

flight or fight neural pathways to the detriment of other  

skill.

Child abuse can trigger elevated and chronic stress response in young  children. Can result in long-term changes in emotional behavior and  cognitive function. Children living in abusive and neglectful environments  have high stress for longer amounts of time. Brains are different. Oregon Primate Center – Studying the Effects of Maternal Bonding

• Judy Cameron... Separating baby monkeys from their mothers • Group 1: removed from mothers at birth

o Did not know how to be social; tried harder to be social;  scared other monkey babies; lead to Aggressive Behavior by  Group 1 Monkey babies

• Group 2: removed form mothers after 2 weeks

• Group 3: weaned normally at 6 weeks

Important Family Dynamics

• Parents “train” child to have antisocial behaviors

• Why would parents do this?

o They don’t know how to be a positive role model

• Patterson studied 206 4th grade boys who exhibited problem  behaviors in school; nearly 50% were arrested by age 14; 75% of  those went on to be career criminals

o Being arrested by age 14 is the most important predictive  event for criminal behavior – “Early Starters”

▪ Coercive family relation ships; harsh and inconsistent  

punishment; school failure; deviant peer groups

▪ 2-3x more likely to become career criminals

o Arrested after age 14 – “Late Starters”

▪ Respond to treatment; multiple support systems;  

typically grow out of delinquency

Prenatal Factors… Temperament … Low Attachment / Bonding Coercive family processes… Harsh and Inconsistent punishment… girls:  victimization

Early Start Delinquency… Delinquent Peer Group

Leve & Chamberlain 2002… Victimization: most violent girls have been  victimized

• Relational aggression: relational aggression was not being  measured

• Family criminality and family transitions: led to early start  delinquency that led to risky sexual behavior

• Most interventions geared for boys: ES girls have different needs  than ES boys

• Evidence that girls are detained more for similar crimes compared  to boys: strong evidence that more detention results in worse  outcomes

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