×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UF - ISM 3004 - Class Notes - Week 9
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UF - ISM 3004 - Class Notes - Week 9

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UF / General Business / GEB 3004 / What are the major differentiators between web 1.0 and web 2.0?

What are the major differentiators between web 1.0 and web 2.0?

What are the major differentiators between web 1.0 and web 2.0?

Description

Scavenger Hunt – Week 09 – Social Media, Peer Production, and Web 2.0 – Part 1 Unit 1: Introduction


What are the major differentiators between web 1.0 and web 2.0?



09.01-Module Introduction

∙ What are the characteristics of Web 1.0 sites?

o Static website-like brochures, not very interactive

o Transaction-oriented storefront websites

o All about easy information retrieval  

∙ What are the characteristics of Web 2.0 sites?

o Collaboration and information sharing

o User-generated content

o Rich user experience

o Highly dynamic content

o Folksonomy: common people organizing thing like hashtagging  

 Build upon user’s own vocabulary

∙ What are the major differentiators between Web 1.0 and Web 2.0?

o With Web 1.0, the user had to go out into the site to see if anything has changed o With Web 2.0, dynamic content, can be notified when something changes  ∙ RSS


What are some reasons an organization might want to use blogging?



o Allowing people to subscribe to your content Don't forget about the age old question of Who does pelops get help from to win the race, and what is he given?

o Bringing content together from many different places and putting it in one place ∙ UGC

o User-generated content

∙ What is meant by the term, Peer Production? What types of things are created? o Users collaboratively work together to create

 Content

 Products

 Services

o Consumer participation

o Web 2.0 allows for them to work together

∙ Rise of Social Networks

o What fraction of top 10 Internet sites are social?

 50% social

o How do “network effects” impact social networks?

 As the number of users on a system increases, its utility to all those users  increases, which draws in even more people


How can wikis be used in the business environment?



09.02-Societal Impact

∙ Fastest growing demographic among social media users is 45-54

∙ Growth in mobile use… US adult Android and iPhone users spend 65% more time using  mobile apps than  

two years ago, as of Fall 2014.

Unit 2: Tools of the Trade

09.03-Blogs

∙ Brief history of blog development

o More than half of US Internet users read blogs at least once/month? ∙ Features and Risks – for the full picture, see the lecture, Table 8.2 in Gallaugher, and also  section 8.2 Blogs Don't forget about the age old question of How will you define mercantilism?

o What are the key features of blogs? How does each work? Its implications? What are potential risks / dangers? Which blog feature(s) lead to those risks?

 Immediate publication

∙ Simple editor that allows for people to get their thoughts on the web ∙ Can be risky!

o Unfiltered

o PR risk

o If something you post goes viral in a negative way, it can really  

hurt your business

 Reverse chronology  

∙ Newest content on top, oldest on bottom Don't forget about the age old question of What was bandura's experiment? why could it not be legitimate?

 Comments

∙ Running dialogue among participants

∙ Keeps the blogger honest

∙ Spam can be a problem

 Tagging

∙ Folksonomy  

∙ Helps readers find content they are interested in Don't forget about the age old question of What is deterrence theory?

 Easy to use

 Persistence

∙ Posts are maintained indefinitely at locations accessible by permanent  links

 Searchable  

 Trackbacks

∙ Allows an author to acknowledge the source of an item in their post, which allows bloggers to follow the popularity of their posts among other bloggers. If you want to learn more check out What did the researchers learn from the effect of sunlight on multiple sclerosis?

 Think Web 2.0

o WYSIWYG

 What you see is what you get

 On-screen content closely resembles what you will see when you publish

∙ Effectiveness of blogs… (rough numbers only – so you’ve got a notion of the importance  of each)

o Influence on business leaders… 23% of top executives read blogs regularly o Blogs are 95% more likely to influence purchase decisions than magazines ∙ Key Players

o Who are they?

 Wordpress

 Blogger

o Which open source blogging system dominates on-premise blog installations?  Why might a company choose an on-prem blog system instead of the cloud?  Wordpress

∙ Very flexible and customizable

∙ Can run the on-house for security concernsIf you want to learn more check out What is a paraphilia?

Gallaugher: 8.2 Blogs

∙ Trackbacks

o citation links back to the original blog post 

∙ Blog rolls

o a list of a blogger’s favorite sites—a sort of shout-out to blogging peers 

∙ What are some reasons an organization might want to use blogging?

o Blogging can have significant appeal for an organization looking to be heard. Corporations that  blog can enjoy immediate and unfiltereddistribution of their ideas, with no limits on page size,  word count, or publication deadline. And they can gather immediate feedback from readers via  comments. Corporate blogs can be published directly to the public, skipping what bloggers call  the mainstream media (MSM) and presenting their words without a journalist filtering their  comments or an editor cutting out key points they’d hoped to make. That appeal has attracted  some of the most senior executives to blogging. 

∙ Owned Media

o are communication channels that an organization controls. These can include firm-run blogs and Web sites, any firm-distributed corporate mobile Web site or app, and organization accounts on  social media such as Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube, and Instagram. Visit the Starbucks  Web site? That’s media owned by Starbucks 

∙ Paid Media

o refers to efforts where an organization pays to leverage a channel or promote a message. Paid  media efforts include things such as advertisement and sponsorships. See a Starbucks ad  online? That’s paid media. 

∙ Earned Media

o are promotions that are not paid for or owned but rather grow organically from customer efforts or other favorable publicity. Social media can be a key driver of earned media (think positive  tweets, referring Facebook posts, and pins on Pinterest). Other forms of earned media include  unsolicited positive press and positive customer word of mouth. View unsolicited praise of  Starbucks in your Twitter feed by folks you follow? That’s earned media. 

∙ Inbound Marketing

o refers to leveraging online channels to draw consumers to the firm with compelling content  rather than conventional forms of promotion such as advertising, e-mail marketing, traditional  mailings, and sales calls. 

o Successful inbound marketers produce interesting content that acts as a magnet for the  attention of potential customers. Inbound marketers look to attract traffic that is converted to  leads that result in sales and hopefully repeat business. 

o Popular blog posts and other forms of social media play a critical role here, as do other online  material such as free whitepapers and eBooks. Material deemed useful is likely to gain more  Web links and cause firm-affiliated content to rise in SEO rankings, making your firm easy to  find and solidifying perception of your firm as an expert. A catchy viral campaign can also bring  in customers to an owned channel and gain earned media referrals. 

09.04-Additional Web 2.0 Tools

∙ Wikis

o What does the word “wiki” mean? Why is this an apt name?

 Comes from Hawaiian word that means quick

 Means a website that anyone can edit directly via browser

o What are the key features of wikis? How does each work? Its implications?  Note: for the full picture, refer to the lecture, Table 8.2 and section 8.3 Wikis  in Gallaugher

 Highly collaborative document creation

 Changes attributed

 Revision History

 Can rollback to the way it was previous versions

 Update notifications

 Current

o How can wikis be used in the business environment?

 Working together in groups to create documents

 Small Scale: IT Tech wikipage

 Large Scale: Wikipedia

 Using Wikis used for meetings

∙ Opportunity cost for people at meetings, can set projects back

∙ Wikis can make meetings better

o Members of team can work together to create valuable agenda

∙ Publish results of meetings  

∙ Making meetings more efficient and less time consuming  

o What are potential risks / dangers?

 No professional organized  

∙ Lack of organization  

∙ Content needs to be well organizied so people can access info when  they need it

 Stale content

∙ People forget about the content they publish

∙ Info can become less valuable over time

 Factual errors

∙ Not everyone is an expert

 Soluntion: have a large and active community in your Wiki

∙ Share burden of keeping info up to date

∙ Factual errors corrected quickly

∙ Social Networks

o Be able to explain each of the key features of social networks. How might each be  used in a business environment?

 User profiles

 Group affiliations

 Discussions – Messaging

 Feeds

 Follow

∙ Build network within organization

∙ Follow people who are doing interesting things to learn

 Note: for the full picture, refer to the lecture, Table 8.2 and also section 8.4  Social Networks

∙ Microblogging

o Twitter stats as of early 2015… rough numbers are fine!

 288 million monthly active users

 80% of active users are mobile

o Be able to explain each of the key features of microblogging. For the full picture,  refer to the lecture, Table 8.2 in text section 8.1, and also section 8.5 Twitter…  Post size is ~140 characters

 Multichannel access—web, mobile, sms

 Asymmetrical following

∙ Don’t have control over people who follow you

 @mentions

 #hashtags

∙ Enterprise Social Networks: capabilities of private and public social media, an application o Who are the three key players presented in the lecture?

 Microsoft

∙ Tight integration

o Office365

o Yammer and Sharepoint

o Lync

∙ Enterprise authentication

 Salesforce Chatter

∙ CRM Integration  

o Enables internal communication with sales team

o Respond better to consumer needs

∙ Communities  

 IBM Connections

∙ Collaboration

∙ Content

∙ Communication

o Communicate live with the right professional

Gallaugher: 8.3 Wikis

∙ Wikis

o All changes are attributed, so others can see who made a given edit.

o A complete revision history is maintained so changes can be compared against prior versions and  rolled back as needed.

o There is automatic notification and monitoring of updates; users subscribe to wiki content and can  receive updates via e-mail or RSS feed when pages have been changed or new content has been  added.

o All the pages in a wiki are searchable.

o Specific wiki pages can be classified under an organized tagging scheme.

∙ Roll Back

o Wikis also provide a version history. Click the “History” link on Wikipedia, for example, and you  can see when edits were made and by whom. This feature allows the community to roll back a  wiki to a prior state, in the event that someone accidentally deletes key info, or intentionally  defaces a page. 

∙ How can wikis be used in the business environment? See text section 8.3 under the  section titled, “Examples of Wiki-Wise Organizations.”  

o At Pixar, wikis go after that great corporate productivity killer—the poorly planned meeting. All Pixar  product meetings have an associated wiki. An online agenda ensures that all attendees arrive knowing  the topics and issues to be covered. Anyone attending the meeting (and even those who can’t make it) can update the agenda, post supporting materials, and make comments, helping ensure everyone has  access to materials for preparation and can arrive with clear expectations and goals to focus on.

o At European investment bank Dresdner Kleinwort Wasserstein, employees use wikis for everything  from setting meeting agendas to building multimedia training for new hires. Six months after launch,

wiki use had surpassed activity on the firm’s established intranet. Wikis are also credited with helping  to reduce Dresdner e-mail traffic by 75 percent. [3] 

o Sony’s PlayStation team uses wikis to regularly maintain one-page overviews on the status of various  projects. In this way, legal, marketing, and finance staff can get quick, up-to-date status reports on  relevant projects, including the latest projected deadlines, action items, and benchmark progress.  Strong security measures are enforced that limit access to only those who must be in the know, since  the overviews often discuss products that have not been released.

o Employees at investment-advisory firm Manning and Napier use a wiki to collaboratively track news in  areas of critical interest. Providing central repositories for employees to share articles and update  evolving summaries on topics such as health care legislation, enables the firm to collect and focus  

what would otherwise be fragmented findings and insight. Now all employees can refer to central  pages that each serve as a lightning rod attracting the latest and most relevant findings.

o Intellipedia is a secure wiki built on Intelink, a U.S. government system connecting sixteen spy  agencies, military organizations, and the Department of State. The wiki is a “magnum opus of  espionage,” handling some one hundred thousand user accounts and five thousand page edits a day.  Access is classified in tiers as “unclassified,” “secret,” and “top secret” (the latter hosting hundreds of  thousands of pages and tens of thousands of user accounts). A page on the Mumbai terror attacks was  up within minutes of the event, while a set of field instructions relating to the use of chlorine-based  terror bombs in Iraq was posted and refined within two days of material identification—with the  document edited by twenty-three users at eighteen locations.

o Intuit has created a “community wiki” that encourages the sharing of experience and knowledge not  just regarding Intuit products, such as QuickBooks, but also across broader topics its customers may be interested in, such as industry-specific issues (e.g., architecture, nonprofit) or small business tips (e.g.,  hiring and training employees). The TurboTax maker has also sponsored TaxAlmanac.org, a wiki-based  tax resource and research community.

o Microsoft leveraged its customer base to supplement documentation for its Visual Studio software  development tool. The firm was able to enter the Brazilian market with Visual Studio in part because  users had created product documentation in Portuguese. [5] 

Gallaugher: 8.4 Social Networks

∙ Public Social Networks

o How is One Kings Lane leveraging social networks to make selling something 3x  more likely than it is for the typical visitor to their website?

 Another example is the visually oriented social network Pinterest, which is driving cool hunting, high-value buyers. Web-based home furnishings provider One Kings Lane  

(which did over $200 million in business in 2012 and is ranked second only to  

PotteryBarn.com in reach) [4] benefits greatly from the viral sharing of Pinterest fans.  Since offering “Pin It” buttons next to all items sold on its Web site, Pinterest traffic has  nearly exceeded that of Facebook, while referrals from Pinterest are three times more  likely to result in a sale than visits from the site’s typical visitor. 

o What did a senior Starbucks manager say about the value of LinkedIn?   Starbucks’s manager of enterprise staffing has stated that LinkedIn is “one of the best  things for finding midlevel executives.” 

∙ Viral

o Feeds are inherently viral. By seeing what others are doing on a social network, and by  leveraging the power of others to act as word-of-mouth evangelists, feeds can rapidly mobilize  populations, prompt activism, and offer low-cost promotion and awareness of a firm’s efforts.  Many firms now see a Facebook presence and social engagement strategy as vital. Facebook’s  massive size and the viral power of spreading the word through feeds, plus the opportunity to  invite commentary and engage consumers in a dialogue, rather than a continual barrage of  promotion, is changing the way that firms and customers interact (indeed, you’ll hear many

successful social media professionals declare that social media is more about conversations with customers than about advertising-style promotion). 

∙ Business Uses of Private (Internal) Social Networks Many firms are choosing to meet this  demand by implementing internal social network platforms that are secure and tailored to firm needs.  o At the most basic level, these networks have supplanted the traditional employee directory.  Social network listings are easy to update and expand, and employees are encouraged to add  their own photos, interests, and expertise to create a living digital identity. 

o Why do Deloitte, Dow and Goldman Sachs use for alumni?

 Firms such as Deloitte, Dow Chemical, and Goldman Sachs have created social networks for “alumni” who have left the firm or retired. These networks can be useful in  

maintaining contacts for future business leads, rehiring former employees (20 percent of Deloitte’s experienced hires are so-called boomerangs, or returning employees), or  

recruiting retired staff to serve as contractors when labor is tight. [10] Maintaining such  networks will be critical in industries like IT and health care that are likely to be plagued by worker shortages for years to come. 

o Why is it ideal for IBM?

 Social networking can also be important for organizations like IBM, where some 42  percent of employees regularly work from home or client locations. IBM’s social network makes it easier to locate employee expertise within the firm, organize virtual work  

groups, and communicate across large distances. [11] As a dialogue catalyst, a social  

network transforms the public directory into a font of knowledge sharing that promotes  organization flattening and value-adding expertise sharing. 

∙ What are potential risks / dangers? (see “A Little Too Public?”)

o As with any type of social media, content flows in social networks are difficult to control.  Embarrassing disclosures can emerge from public systems or insecure internal networks.  Employees embracing a culture of digital sharing may err and release confidential or  proprietary information. Networks could serve as a focal point for the disgruntled (imagine the  activity on a corporate social network after a painful layoff). Publicly declared affiliations,  political or religious views, excessive contact, declined participation, and other factors might  lead to awkward or strained employee relationships. Users may not want to add a coworker as a friend on a public network if it means they’ll expose their activities, lives, persona, photos, sense of humor, and friends as they exist outside of work. And many firms fear wasted time as  employees surf the musings and photos of their peers. 

Gallaugher: 8.5 Twitter and the Rise of Microblogging

∙ Hashtag

o Users can classify comments on a given topic using hash tags (keywords preceded by the “#” or “hash” symbol), allowing others to quickly find related tweets (e.g., #iranelection, #mumbai,  #swineflu, #sxsw). Any user can create a hash tag—just type it into your tweet (you may want  to search Twitter first to make sure that the tag is not in use by an unrelated topic and that if it  is in use, it appropriately describes how you want your tweet classified). 

∙ Free rider problem

o Twitter also shows the challenges many firms face when weighing the advantages of being an  open platform rather than a walled garden. Twitter initially made its data available for free to  other developers via API (application programming interface). Exposing data can be a good  move as it spawned an ecosystem of over one hundred thousand complementary third-party  products and services that enhance Twitter’s reach and usefulness (generating network  effects from complementary offerings similar to other “platforms” like Windows, iPhone, and  Facebook). But there are potential downsides to such openness. If users don’t visit Twitter.com,  that makes it difficult to count users, serve profiling technologies such as tracking cookies  (see Chapter 15 "Information Security: Barbarians at the Gateway (and Just About Everywhere  Else)" “Information Security: Barbarians at the Gateway (and Just About Everywhere Else)”),  collect additional data on service use, and make money by serving ads or offering promotions on the Web site. All this creates what is known as the “free rider problem,” where others benefit  from a service while offering no value in exchange. 

o When users don’t visit a service, it makes it difficult to spread awareness of new products and  features. It can also create branding challenges and customer frustration. Twitter execs  lamented that customers were often confused when they searched for “Twitter” in the iPhone

App Store and were presented with scores of offerings but none from Twitter itself. [17] Twitter’s  purchase of the iPhone app Tweetie (subsequently turned into the free “Twitter for iPhone”  app), its acquisition of TweetDeck, and the launch of its own URL-shortening service (limiting  opportunities for bit.ly and others) allowed the firm to bring in-house efforts that might  otherwise lead to “user leakage” to other services. Twitter has also blocked Instagram and  Tumblr users from easily searching for friends who are on Twitter, nixed an agreement that  fostered tweet syndication and other sharing on LinkedIn, and disconnected the popular Web  automation service IFTTT (If This Then That). [18] Why help other firms grow at the expense of  time spent on Twitter? 

09.05-Private Social Networks

∙ How are private social networks similar to public networks like Facebook? How do they  differ?  

o Same

 Profiles

 Groups

 Discussions

 Messaging

 Feeds

 Following

o Different:

 Restricted access

∙ Insiders only… SSO

∙ Links to corporate data and systems

∙ Data protected behind firewall (unless hosted in the cloud)

 Add social awareness to enterprise application

∙ How do companies use Private Social Networks?

o Find out about your colleagues  

 Discover other people with common interests

 Locate experts

o Build a network

 Advice, references, referrals

 Disseminate information/alerts to your network

o Form teams, communicate and informal groups

o Collaborate on group projects

 Discuss and comment on the work

 Distribute workforce

∙ Augment your notes on leading products, started in lecture 09.04

o IBM

 Strengths

∙ Visions and ability to execute

o Key strategic focus for IBM

o Strong services, consulting and technology

o Ongoing investment  

∙ Tight integration with other IBM tools

o Notes, Domino, Content Manager, Web Portal

∙ Many large customers

o 10,000+ users

o Jive Software

o Microsoft

 Sharepoint and Yammer

 Strengths incluse

∙ Social integration with…

o Office and Office365

o Exchange Email and Lync communications

o Dynamics

∙ Browser-based multiuser document editing

∙ SharePoint-collaboration, content management, Business intelligence,  etc.  

o Salesforce

Scavenger Hunt – Week 09 – Social Media, Peer Production, and Web 2.0 – Part 1 Unit 1: Introduction

09.01-Module Introduction

∙ What are the characteristics of Web 1.0 sites?

o Static website-like brochures, not very interactive

o Transaction-oriented storefront websites

o All about easy information retrieval  

∙ What are the characteristics of Web 2.0 sites?

o Collaboration and information sharing

o User-generated content

o Rich user experience

o Highly dynamic content

o Folksonomy: common people organizing thing like hashtagging  

 Build upon user’s own vocabulary

∙ What are the major differentiators between Web 1.0 and Web 2.0?

o With Web 1.0, the user had to go out into the site to see if anything has changed o With Web 2.0, dynamic content, can be notified when something changes  ∙ RSS

o Allowing people to subscribe to your content

o Bringing content together from many different places and putting it in one place ∙ UGC

o User-generated content

∙ What is meant by the term, Peer Production? What types of things are created? o Users collaboratively work together to create

 Content

 Products

 Services

o Consumer participation

o Web 2.0 allows for them to work together

∙ Rise of Social Networks

o What fraction of top 10 Internet sites are social?

 50% social

o How do “network effects” impact social networks?

 As the number of users on a system increases, its utility to all those users  increases, which draws in even more people

09.02-Societal Impact

∙ Fastest growing demographic among social media users is 45-54

∙ Growth in mobile use… US adult Android and iPhone users spend 65% more time using  mobile apps than  

two years ago, as of Fall 2014.

Unit 2: Tools of the Trade

09.03-Blogs

∙ Brief history of blog development

o More than half of US Internet users read blogs at least once/month? ∙ Features and Risks – for the full picture, see the lecture, Table 8.2 in Gallaugher, and also  section 8.2 Blogs

o What are the key features of blogs? How does each work? Its implications? What are potential risks / dangers? Which blog feature(s) lead to those risks?

 Immediate publication

∙ Simple editor that allows for people to get their thoughts on the web ∙ Can be risky!

o Unfiltered

o PR risk

o If something you post goes viral in a negative way, it can really  

hurt your business

 Reverse chronology  

∙ Newest content on top, oldest on bottom

 Comments

∙ Running dialogue among participants

∙ Keeps the blogger honest

∙ Spam can be a problem

 Tagging

∙ Folksonomy  

∙ Helps readers find content they are interested in

 Easy to use

 Persistence

∙ Posts are maintained indefinitely at locations accessible by permanent  links

 Searchable  

 Trackbacks

∙ Allows an author to acknowledge the source of an item in their post, which allows bloggers to follow the popularity of their posts among other bloggers. 

 Think Web 2.0

o WYSIWYG

 What you see is what you get

 On-screen content closely resembles what you will see when you publish

∙ Effectiveness of blogs… (rough numbers only – so you’ve got a notion of the importance  of each)

o Influence on business leaders… 23% of top executives read blogs regularly o Blogs are 95% more likely to influence purchase decisions than magazines ∙ Key Players

o Who are they?

 Wordpress

 Blogger

o Which open source blogging system dominates on-premise blog installations?  Why might a company choose an on-prem blog system instead of the cloud?  Wordpress

∙ Very flexible and customizable

∙ Can run the on-house for security concerns

Gallaugher: 8.2 Blogs

∙ Trackbacks

o citation links back to the original blog post 

∙ Blog rolls

o a list of a blogger’s favorite sites—a sort of shout-out to blogging peers 

∙ What are some reasons an organization might want to use blogging?

o Blogging can have significant appeal for an organization looking to be heard. Corporations that  blog can enjoy immediate and unfiltereddistribution of their ideas, with no limits on page size,  word count, or publication deadline. And they can gather immediate feedback from readers via  comments. Corporate blogs can be published directly to the public, skipping what bloggers call  the mainstream media (MSM) and presenting their words without a journalist filtering their  comments or an editor cutting out key points they’d hoped to make. That appeal has attracted  some of the most senior executives to blogging. 

∙ Owned Media

o are communication channels that an organization controls. These can include firm-run blogs and Web sites, any firm-distributed corporate mobile Web site or app, and organization accounts on  social media such as Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, YouTube, and Instagram. Visit the Starbucks  Web site? That’s media owned by Starbucks 

∙ Paid Media

o refers to efforts where an organization pays to leverage a channel or promote a message. Paid  media efforts include things such as advertisement and sponsorships. See a Starbucks ad  online? That’s paid media. 

∙ Earned Media

o are promotions that are not paid for or owned but rather grow organically from customer efforts or other favorable publicity. Social media can be a key driver of earned media (think positive  tweets, referring Facebook posts, and pins on Pinterest). Other forms of earned media include  unsolicited positive press and positive customer word of mouth. View unsolicited praise of  Starbucks in your Twitter feed by folks you follow? That’s earned media. 

∙ Inbound Marketing

o refers to leveraging online channels to draw consumers to the firm with compelling content  rather than conventional forms of promotion such as advertising, e-mail marketing, traditional  mailings, and sales calls. 

o Successful inbound marketers produce interesting content that acts as a magnet for the  attention of potential customers. Inbound marketers look to attract traffic that is converted to  leads that result in sales and hopefully repeat business. 

o Popular blog posts and other forms of social media play a critical role here, as do other online  material such as free whitepapers and eBooks. Material deemed useful is likely to gain more  Web links and cause firm-affiliated content to rise in SEO rankings, making your firm easy to  find and solidifying perception of your firm as an expert. A catchy viral campaign can also bring  in customers to an owned channel and gain earned media referrals. 

09.04-Additional Web 2.0 Tools

∙ Wikis

o What does the word “wiki” mean? Why is this an apt name?

 Comes from Hawaiian word that means quick

 Means a website that anyone can edit directly via browser

o What are the key features of wikis? How does each work? Its implications?  Note: for the full picture, refer to the lecture, Table 8.2 and section 8.3 Wikis  in Gallaugher

 Highly collaborative document creation

 Changes attributed

 Revision History

 Can rollback to the way it was previous versions

 Update notifications

 Current

o How can wikis be used in the business environment?

 Working together in groups to create documents

 Small Scale: IT Tech wikipage

 Large Scale: Wikipedia

 Using Wikis used for meetings

∙ Opportunity cost for people at meetings, can set projects back

∙ Wikis can make meetings better

o Members of team can work together to create valuable agenda

∙ Publish results of meetings  

∙ Making meetings more efficient and less time consuming  

o What are potential risks / dangers?

 No professional organized  

∙ Lack of organization  

∙ Content needs to be well organizied so people can access info when  they need it

 Stale content

∙ People forget about the content they publish

∙ Info can become less valuable over time

 Factual errors

∙ Not everyone is an expert

 Soluntion: have a large and active community in your Wiki

∙ Share burden of keeping info up to date

∙ Factual errors corrected quickly

∙ Social Networks

o Be able to explain each of the key features of social networks. How might each be  used in a business environment?

 User profiles

 Group affiliations

 Discussions – Messaging

 Feeds

 Follow

∙ Build network within organization

∙ Follow people who are doing interesting things to learn

 Note: for the full picture, refer to the lecture, Table 8.2 and also section 8.4  Social Networks

∙ Microblogging

o Twitter stats as of early 2015… rough numbers are fine!

 288 million monthly active users

 80% of active users are mobile

o Be able to explain each of the key features of microblogging. For the full picture,  refer to the lecture, Table 8.2 in text section 8.1, and also section 8.5 Twitter…  Post size is ~140 characters

 Multichannel access—web, mobile, sms

 Asymmetrical following

∙ Don’t have control over people who follow you

 @mentions

 #hashtags

∙ Enterprise Social Networks: capabilities of private and public social media, an application o Who are the three key players presented in the lecture?

 Microsoft

∙ Tight integration

o Office365

o Yammer and Sharepoint

o Lync

∙ Enterprise authentication

 Salesforce Chatter

∙ CRM Integration  

o Enables internal communication with sales team

o Respond better to consumer needs

∙ Communities  

 IBM Connections

∙ Collaboration

∙ Content

∙ Communication

o Communicate live with the right professional

Gallaugher: 8.3 Wikis

∙ Wikis

o All changes are attributed, so others can see who made a given edit.

o A complete revision history is maintained so changes can be compared against prior versions and  rolled back as needed.

o There is automatic notification and monitoring of updates; users subscribe to wiki content and can  receive updates via e-mail or RSS feed when pages have been changed or new content has been  added.

o All the pages in a wiki are searchable.

o Specific wiki pages can be classified under an organized tagging scheme.

∙ Roll Back

o Wikis also provide a version history. Click the “History” link on Wikipedia, for example, and you  can see when edits were made and by whom. This feature allows the community to roll back a  wiki to a prior state, in the event that someone accidentally deletes key info, or intentionally  defaces a page. 

∙ How can wikis be used in the business environment? See text section 8.3 under the  section titled, “Examples of Wiki-Wise Organizations.”  

o At Pixar, wikis go after that great corporate productivity killer—the poorly planned meeting. All Pixar  product meetings have an associated wiki. An online agenda ensures that all attendees arrive knowing  the topics and issues to be covered. Anyone attending the meeting (and even those who can’t make it) can update the agenda, post supporting materials, and make comments, helping ensure everyone has  access to materials for preparation and can arrive with clear expectations and goals to focus on.

o At European investment bank Dresdner Kleinwort Wasserstein, employees use wikis for everything  from setting meeting agendas to building multimedia training for new hires. Six months after launch,

wiki use had surpassed activity on the firm’s established intranet. Wikis are also credited with helping  to reduce Dresdner e-mail traffic by 75 percent. [3] 

o Sony’s PlayStation team uses wikis to regularly maintain one-page overviews on the status of various  projects. In this way, legal, marketing, and finance staff can get quick, up-to-date status reports on  relevant projects, including the latest projected deadlines, action items, and benchmark progress.  Strong security measures are enforced that limit access to only those who must be in the know, since  the overviews often discuss products that have not been released.

o Employees at investment-advisory firm Manning and Napier use a wiki to collaboratively track news in  areas of critical interest. Providing central repositories for employees to share articles and update  evolving summaries on topics such as health care legislation, enables the firm to collect and focus  

what would otherwise be fragmented findings and insight. Now all employees can refer to central  pages that each serve as a lightning rod attracting the latest and most relevant findings.

o Intellipedia is a secure wiki built on Intelink, a U.S. government system connecting sixteen spy  agencies, military organizations, and the Department of State. The wiki is a “magnum opus of  espionage,” handling some one hundred thousand user accounts and five thousand page edits a day.  Access is classified in tiers as “unclassified,” “secret,” and “top secret” (the latter hosting hundreds of  thousands of pages and tens of thousands of user accounts). A page on the Mumbai terror attacks was  up within minutes of the event, while a set of field instructions relating to the use of chlorine-based  terror bombs in Iraq was posted and refined within two days of material identification—with the  document edited by twenty-three users at eighteen locations.

o Intuit has created a “community wiki” that encourages the sharing of experience and knowledge not  just regarding Intuit products, such as QuickBooks, but also across broader topics its customers may be interested in, such as industry-specific issues (e.g., architecture, nonprofit) or small business tips (e.g.,  hiring and training employees). The TurboTax maker has also sponsored TaxAlmanac.org, a wiki-based  tax resource and research community.

o Microsoft leveraged its customer base to supplement documentation for its Visual Studio software  development tool. The firm was able to enter the Brazilian market with Visual Studio in part because  users had created product documentation in Portuguese. [5] 

Gallaugher: 8.4 Social Networks

∙ Public Social Networks

o How is One Kings Lane leveraging social networks to make selling something 3x  more likely than it is for the typical visitor to their website?

 Another example is the visually oriented social network Pinterest, which is driving cool hunting, high-value buyers. Web-based home furnishings provider One Kings Lane  

(which did over $200 million in business in 2012 and is ranked second only to  

PotteryBarn.com in reach) [4] benefits greatly from the viral sharing of Pinterest fans.  Since offering “Pin It” buttons next to all items sold on its Web site, Pinterest traffic has  nearly exceeded that of Facebook, while referrals from Pinterest are three times more  likely to result in a sale than visits from the site’s typical visitor. 

o What did a senior Starbucks manager say about the value of LinkedIn?   Starbucks’s manager of enterprise staffing has stated that LinkedIn is “one of the best  things for finding midlevel executives.” 

∙ Viral

o Feeds are inherently viral. By seeing what others are doing on a social network, and by  leveraging the power of others to act as word-of-mouth evangelists, feeds can rapidly mobilize  populations, prompt activism, and offer low-cost promotion and awareness of a firm’s efforts.  Many firms now see a Facebook presence and social engagement strategy as vital. Facebook’s  massive size and the viral power of spreading the word through feeds, plus the opportunity to  invite commentary and engage consumers in a dialogue, rather than a continual barrage of  promotion, is changing the way that firms and customers interact (indeed, you’ll hear many

successful social media professionals declare that social media is more about conversations with customers than about advertising-style promotion). 

∙ Business Uses of Private (Internal) Social Networks Many firms are choosing to meet this  demand by implementing internal social network platforms that are secure and tailored to firm needs.  o At the most basic level, these networks have supplanted the traditional employee directory.  Social network listings are easy to update and expand, and employees are encouraged to add  their own photos, interests, and expertise to create a living digital identity. 

o Why do Deloitte, Dow and Goldman Sachs use for alumni?

 Firms such as Deloitte, Dow Chemical, and Goldman Sachs have created social networks for “alumni” who have left the firm or retired. These networks can be useful in  

maintaining contacts for future business leads, rehiring former employees (20 percent of Deloitte’s experienced hires are so-called boomerangs, or returning employees), or  

recruiting retired staff to serve as contractors when labor is tight. [10] Maintaining such  networks will be critical in industries like IT and health care that are likely to be plagued by worker shortages for years to come. 

o Why is it ideal for IBM?

 Social networking can also be important for organizations like IBM, where some 42  percent of employees regularly work from home or client locations. IBM’s social network makes it easier to locate employee expertise within the firm, organize virtual work  

groups, and communicate across large distances. [11] As a dialogue catalyst, a social  

network transforms the public directory into a font of knowledge sharing that promotes  organization flattening and value-adding expertise sharing. 

∙ What are potential risks / dangers? (see “A Little Too Public?”)

o As with any type of social media, content flows in social networks are difficult to control.  Embarrassing disclosures can emerge from public systems or insecure internal networks.  Employees embracing a culture of digital sharing may err and release confidential or  proprietary information. Networks could serve as a focal point for the disgruntled (imagine the  activity on a corporate social network after a painful layoff). Publicly declared affiliations,  political or religious views, excessive contact, declined participation, and other factors might  lead to awkward or strained employee relationships. Users may not want to add a coworker as a friend on a public network if it means they’ll expose their activities, lives, persona, photos, sense of humor, and friends as they exist outside of work. And many firms fear wasted time as  employees surf the musings and photos of their peers. 

Gallaugher: 8.5 Twitter and the Rise of Microblogging

∙ Hashtag

o Users can classify comments on a given topic using hash tags (keywords preceded by the “#” or “hash” symbol), allowing others to quickly find related tweets (e.g., #iranelection, #mumbai,  #swineflu, #sxsw). Any user can create a hash tag—just type it into your tweet (you may want  to search Twitter first to make sure that the tag is not in use by an unrelated topic and that if it  is in use, it appropriately describes how you want your tweet classified). 

∙ Free rider problem

o Twitter also shows the challenges many firms face when weighing the advantages of being an  open platform rather than a walled garden. Twitter initially made its data available for free to  other developers via API (application programming interface). Exposing data can be a good  move as it spawned an ecosystem of over one hundred thousand complementary third-party  products and services that enhance Twitter’s reach and usefulness (generating network  effects from complementary offerings similar to other “platforms” like Windows, iPhone, and  Facebook). But there are potential downsides to such openness. If users don’t visit Twitter.com,  that makes it difficult to count users, serve profiling technologies such as tracking cookies  (see Chapter 15 "Information Security: Barbarians at the Gateway (and Just About Everywhere  Else)" “Information Security: Barbarians at the Gateway (and Just About Everywhere Else)”),  collect additional data on service use, and make money by serving ads or offering promotions on the Web site. All this creates what is known as the “free rider problem,” where others benefit  from a service while offering no value in exchange. 

o When users don’t visit a service, it makes it difficult to spread awareness of new products and  features. It can also create branding challenges and customer frustration. Twitter execs  lamented that customers were often confused when they searched for “Twitter” in the iPhone

App Store and were presented with scores of offerings but none from Twitter itself. [17] Twitter’s  purchase of the iPhone app Tweetie (subsequently turned into the free “Twitter for iPhone”  app), its acquisition of TweetDeck, and the launch of its own URL-shortening service (limiting  opportunities for bit.ly and others) allowed the firm to bring in-house efforts that might  otherwise lead to “user leakage” to other services. Twitter has also blocked Instagram and  Tumblr users from easily searching for friends who are on Twitter, nixed an agreement that  fostered tweet syndication and other sharing on LinkedIn, and disconnected the popular Web  automation service IFTTT (If This Then That). [18] Why help other firms grow at the expense of  time spent on Twitter? 

09.05-Private Social Networks

∙ How are private social networks similar to public networks like Facebook? How do they  differ?  

o Same

 Profiles

 Groups

 Discussions

 Messaging

 Feeds

 Following

o Different:

 Restricted access

∙ Insiders only… SSO

∙ Links to corporate data and systems

∙ Data protected behind firewall (unless hosted in the cloud)

 Add social awareness to enterprise application

∙ How do companies use Private Social Networks?

o Find out about your colleagues  

 Discover other people with common interests

 Locate experts

o Build a network

 Advice, references, referrals

 Disseminate information/alerts to your network

o Form teams, communicate and informal groups

o Collaborate on group projects

 Discuss and comment on the work

 Distribute workforce

∙ Augment your notes on leading products, started in lecture 09.04

o IBM

 Strengths

∙ Visions and ability to execute

o Key strategic focus for IBM

o Strong services, consulting and technology

o Ongoing investment  

∙ Tight integration with other IBM tools

o Notes, Domino, Content Manager, Web Portal

∙ Many large customers

o 10,000+ users

o Jive Software

o Microsoft

 Sharepoint and Yammer

 Strengths incluse

∙ Social integration with…

o Office and Office365

o Exchange Email and Lync communications

o Dynamics

∙ Browser-based multiuser document editing

∙ SharePoint-collaboration, content management, Business intelligence,  etc.  

o Salesforce

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here