×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UO - ARH 358 - Study Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UO - ARH 358 - Study Guide

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UO / Art / ART 358 / art 358

art 358

art 358

Description

School: University of Oregon
Department: Art
Course: History of Design >1
Professor: C
Term: Summer 2015
Tags:
Cost: 50
Name: Quiz 2 Study Guide
Description: This study guide is based on the slides Professor Lord posted. The content of each slide is bolded and what information to focus on is italicized. There have been technical difficulties. If you purchase and it does not load, please e-mail me. Thank you
Uploaded: 11/14/2015
16 Pages 6 Views 11 Unlocks
Reviews

Riley Cole (Rating: )


Hanna Lindstedt (Rating: )


Li Miky (Rating: )

..


Danielle (Rating: )

. Other: Text won't load, pages appear to be blank



Quiz 2 Study Guide  


who is Christopher Dresser?



Quiz date: November 16, 2015

1. Christopher Dresser, Glass and electroplate decanters, Hulkin & Heath ca. 1880 Dresser’s Design Principals:

- Dresser was a key figure during the design reform and the aesthetic movement - He was influenced by John Ruskin, the most influential critic of the 19th century - His interests: nature, the Japanese culture, his imagination and Industry

o Less concerned with historicism or the appropriateness of representational  decorative forms in relation to use - more concerned with the transformation of  naturalistic motifs into expressive pattern and focused on integrating decoration  with existing methods of workshop manufacturing


who is William Morris?



Don't forget about the age old question of stephen striby

o Described himself as an ornamentalist – he provided patterns for wallpapers and  useful goods

o He expanded the audience of art through manufacturing and elevated ordinary  useful objects through his designs

o Seen as the first industrial designer because he developed an original art for  industrial projects  

- Nature is the ideal source for inspiration 

o He studies botany and combines nature and science when designing  

o He is less focused on looking to history for design, instead he looks to nature o He uses scientific learning to generate his designs, which produces abstract  ornamentation We also discuss several other topics like lucbus

o His designs allow for science to be exposed to people who have not studied it  o It also allows artists to be inspired by science  

o Brings nature to a personal level and designs through his imagination

- Aesthetic (Interior) Movement 


who is John Millais?



o Design comes from all forms of art – unity between fine and applied arts

o Japanese and Chinese cultures influence this movement

- He also worked in metal: emphasized the purity of the materials smooth surface  o He did a series of electroplated silver tea sets for the Dixon Company of Sheffield in  1879 We also discuss several other topics like chaffey math

o Dresser did not design for the money

o He thinks like a purist

o Focus is on the character of the material and their own strengths and appeal  o He is able to balance the negative and positive space of the metal

o his aesthetic and design resolution is a matter of him conforming his design ideals to  the manufacturing products

2. William Morris, White Room from interior of Morris’s home 1860

Note furnishings, paintings and finishes and how these reflect principles of Arts and Crafts - Morris = founder of the Arts and Crafts Movement

- His ideas are brilliant and have a great influence in the United States

- He recalls Pugin, with his idea of handcraft and a profound value in looking to the middle ages  for inspiration

- Greatly influenced by Ruskin  

- Morris’s home designed by Webb

o This is Webb’s first building

o Comfortable upper middle class home

o Rooted in medieval architecture style – influence from the Gothic

o Webb describes it as an “honest building”

o Gothic entrance way with a pointed arch

o Medieval decorative painting on the door  

o In the entranceway of the house there are paintings that are set into the doors of the  furniture Don't forget about the age old question of ucsd oti

o Garden quotes medieval models

o Brick is used for durable, homey feel

o Intimacy and warmth of the wood continues throughout the house

o Expression of natural material is important

o Everything, including cabinetry, stained glass, and wallpaper was designed

o Textiles in the home were from arts and craft movement artists too  

o White room has a painting by Rossette that is now at the Tate

3. (NO IMAGE) John Ruskin’s Rules of Production of Healthy Art and Society

1) Never encourage the manufacturer of any article not absolutely necessary and in which  invention has no share

2) Never demand exact finish for its own sake, but only for some practical or noble end. 3) Never encourage imitation or copying of any kind, except for the sake of persevering great  works.

- Theory of Ruskin and the design of the arts and crafts movement: has to do with the  collaboration across fields- people can be multi-dimensional = represents the totality of human  creativity  

Don't forget about the age old question of eric martin virginia tech

4. John Millais Christ in the Carpenter’s Shop 1849-50

Pre-Raphaelite Painting

Relationship between William Morris, the Arts and Craft Movement, John Ruskin and Pre-Raphaelite  painter?

Morris was a neo-gothic artist that was greatly influenced by Ruskin. He critiques Dresser’s work of using  machinery, based on the quality of production and the role of the designer throughout production. If you want to learn more check out crucive

John Ruskin looks back to the medieval as a model and develops a three dimensional idea about design.  

- Ideas of the Arts and Crafts Movement Handcraft (based on Ruskin’s beliefs): o handcraft give a radiance to an object that cannot be developed in machine produced  objects

o smooth surface and symmetry decrease the human choice and value

o Imperfections are essential to an object as an enhancement to the environment

Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood: critical of the materialism that accompanied modern industrialism and was  committed to creating a closer relation between arts and craft in reaction against the established  policies of the Royal Academy in England and the elevated status it accorded the fine arts (Raizman, p.  82). This brotherhood led Morris to pursue an artist-craftsman career.

Pre-Raphaelites have a long production process because the work ethos, thought process and  production is so built into their approach (relationship between art and social reform).

- Renaissance look back to the Greco-Roman and the Pre-Raphaelites reject this - Part of the renaissance model deals with rationalism and progressive culture  - Both Pre-Raphaelite (arts and crafts) and Renaissance model intersect in one way o Honor the individual

o But Raphaelites focus more on the group and social aspects on various levels - Arts and Crafts movement is painfully self-aware of what they are doing. This is not  spontaneous or intuitive art

o Artists go along with the Arts and Crafts Movement- Pre Raphaelite type of art  o Labor intensive approach to it  

o Ruskin is a huge proponent of their work  

5. Arts and Crafts Movement, Philip Webb, Backgammon Players Cabinet 1862 - Webb was also greatly influenced by John Ruskin

- Morris meets Webb while working for him and Webb later design’s Morris home - Backgammon Player has a medieval style, that reflects a castle’s roof form  - Style comes from admiring the Gothic style, like most arts and crafts designers

6. Newcomb vase (New Orleans) 1906

How it relates to the Arts and Craft Movement:

- Newcomb Ceramics work- Attached to Tulane University

- Linkage to Morris’ designs (incorporation of plant forms)  

- Mastery in the balance between negative and positive space

- Design at different junctions of the vase with large and small elements - Great contribution to the ceramics period

- Unique quality from the means of handcraft

7. Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, Poster for Moulin Rouge 1890

It exemplifies innovative printing at the end of the 19th century through its representation of the  explosion of a printing method (chromolithograph). It is a combination of the fine arts and jobbing (advertisements).

Toulouse-Lautrec is innovative with the lithograph –he explores the freedom of this medium. The poster  has a dynamic, sketch like quality – commercial but recognizably styled by Lautrec. He has an expressive  treatment of lines with simplified compositional elements.  

He becomes associated with the Avant Guard = non-traditional subject areas.

- Grinding of wheat and flower was transformed into a place for Moulin rouge (performance)  – this is a new type of social space

- The modern city begins to have new forms of entertainment

- This is a new kind of grand theater where complete strangers from all different social classes  share the same place and sit close (very different from the opera house)

- The poster advertisement has a feeling of the space

o Fantastic balance of the text and the positive and negative space

o Evocation of a modern environment

o Famous dancer and singer shown in this daring pose

o Flipping up of her skirt while doing the can-can, which is a very athletic dance o There is a fellow observer looking at the dancer

o Message is communicated well along with the sense of atmosphere of the  

performance hall

o You can see the mix of classes within the image (silhouette of observers)

o Newspaper of the Moulin rouge – you see a place for seating, but a lot of the  performance takes place on the floor with the public almost part of the act

8. Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, Poster for Lithography 1893

It exemplifies innovative printing at the end of the 19th century through its representation of the  explosion of a printing method (chromolithograph). It is a combination of the fine arts and jobbing (advertisements).

Toulouse-Lautrec is innovative with the lithograph –he explores the freedom of this medium. The poster  has a dynamic, sketch like quality – commercial but recognizably styled by Lautrec.

Toulouse-Lautrec graphics are treated like paintings

The subject of this poster is significant:

- Woman is an important collector of these prints

- Interesting that this woman is shown as a consumer, rather than a performer - She is familiar with the process. It is treated by her as a fine art object.  

- Sharp angle in floor and room - stylized of post impressionism (Van Gogh does this too)

9. Jules Cheret, Loie Fuller 1893

Cheret’s contribution to modern printing:

Cheret mastered chromolithography in England.

The composition of his posters integrated text and images on a monumental scale. He explored with the  process of chromolithography by working directly on the stone. This allowed him to create spontaneous  effects.

Cheret has a more decorative approach to his printing:

- He was interested in the physiological connection to line and color (scientific theory) - Looks at the subliminal quality of line and color to affect the viewer

- This image has upward and positive lines

- Using lithographic medium he can create an image of a suspended figure

- Also has a commercial appeal

- Invests some sub-text that has a joyful color

- Fuller is a mixed performer with modern and pop performances; her key-note dance was  her dance in naturalistic movements. She is known for her evocative movement.  

Victor Horta, Tassel House, Stairhall 1893-1894

Art Nouveau principles:

*this image was not addressed in lecture*

Additional notes:

Arts and Craft Movement= admiration of crafts from the middle ages; saw decorative arts as a vehicle  for enlightenment

- Specifically admired the Gothic because its design was based on morality and faith - Ruskin said designs should reflect the craftsman’s skill, pride and efforts

- Was against the use of machinery because it lacks the expression from the artists and made  elements too uniform

- John Ruskin,

- Augusts Pugin

- William Morris

- Burne-Jones

- Philip Webb

Aesthetic Movement = decorative forms in relation to an objects use; naturalistic forms serve as an  inspiration

- Strong influence from Owen Jones The Grammar of Ornamentation – flat, stylized, design  motifs based on naturalistic, organic forms

- Craft influence of Japan, in terms of its expressive quality/meaning

- Use of workshop manufacture  

- Christopher Dresser

Art Nouveau = aesthetic design and the unity of the arts as they took root on French soil (Raizman, pg.  120)

- It was a time when the urban life was expanding and changing

- Boulevards, bridges, public gardens, monuments etc were constructed under Napoleon III.

Art Nouveau and Posters: 

Elements of Art Nouveau were popularized using chromolithography. Posters were used to advertise  night clubs, cafes, and stores through their colorful representations. They gave a lively presence to the  walls and streets. They demonstrated the power of the simplified image, as performers could be  recognized based on their gestures or simplified attributes.

Quiz 2 Study Guide  

Quiz date: November 16, 2015

1. Christopher Dresser, Glass and electroplate decanters, Hulkin & Heath ca. 1880 Dresser’s Design Principals:

- Dresser was a key figure during the design reform and the aesthetic movement - He was influenced by John Ruskin, the most influential critic of the 19th century - His interests: nature, the Japanese culture, his imagination and Industry

o Less concerned with historicism or the appropriateness of representational  decorative forms in relation to use - more concerned with the transformation of  naturalistic motifs into expressive pattern and focused on integrating decoration  with existing methods of workshop manufacturing

o Described himself as an ornamentalist – he provided patterns for wallpapers and  useful goods

o He expanded the audience of art through manufacturing and elevated ordinary  useful objects through his designs

o Seen as the first industrial designer because he developed an original art for  industrial projects  

- Nature is the ideal source for inspiration 

o He studies botany and combines nature and science when designing  

o He is less focused on looking to history for design, instead he looks to nature o He uses scientific learning to generate his designs, which produces abstract  ornamentation

o His designs allow for science to be exposed to people who have not studied it  o It also allows artists to be inspired by science  

o Brings nature to a personal level and designs through his imagination

- Aesthetic (Interior) Movement 

o Design comes from all forms of art – unity between fine and applied arts

o Japanese and Chinese cultures influence this movement

- He also worked in metal: emphasized the purity of the materials smooth surface  o He did a series of electroplated silver tea sets for the Dixon Company of Sheffield in  1879

o Dresser did not design for the money

o He thinks like a purist

o Focus is on the character of the material and their own strengths and appeal  o He is able to balance the negative and positive space of the metal

o his aesthetic and design resolution is a matter of him conforming his design ideals to  the manufacturing products

2. William Morris, White Room from interior of Morris’s home 1860

Note furnishings, paintings and finishes and how these reflect principles of Arts and Crafts - Morris = founder of the Arts and Crafts Movement

- His ideas are brilliant and have a great influence in the United States

- He recalls Pugin, with his idea of handcraft and a profound value in looking to the middle ages  for inspiration

- Greatly influenced by Ruskin  

- Morris’s home designed by Webb

o This is Webb’s first building

o Comfortable upper middle class home

o Rooted in medieval architecture style – influence from the Gothic

o Webb describes it as an “honest building”

o Gothic entrance way with a pointed arch

o Medieval decorative painting on the door  

o In the entranceway of the house there are paintings that are set into the doors of the  furniture

o Garden quotes medieval models

o Brick is used for durable, homey feel

o Intimacy and warmth of the wood continues throughout the house

o Expression of natural material is important

o Everything, including cabinetry, stained glass, and wallpaper was designed

o Textiles in the home were from arts and craft movement artists too  

o White room has a painting by Rossette that is now at the Tate

3. (NO IMAGE) John Ruskin’s Rules of Production of Healthy Art and Society

1) Never encourage the manufacturer of any article not absolutely necessary and in which  invention has no share

2) Never demand exact finish for its own sake, but only for some practical or noble end. 3) Never encourage imitation or copying of any kind, except for the sake of persevering great  works.

- Theory of Ruskin and the design of the arts and crafts movement: has to do with the  collaboration across fields- people can be multi-dimensional = represents the totality of human  creativity  

4. John Millais Christ in the Carpenter’s Shop 1849-50

Pre-Raphaelite Painting

Relationship between William Morris, the Arts and Craft Movement, John Ruskin and Pre-Raphaelite  painter?

Morris was a neo-gothic artist that was greatly influenced by Ruskin. He critiques Dresser’s work of using  machinery, based on the quality of production and the role of the designer throughout production.

John Ruskin looks back to the medieval as a model and develops a three dimensional idea about design.  

- Ideas of the Arts and Crafts Movement Handcraft (based on Ruskin’s beliefs): o handcraft give a radiance to an object that cannot be developed in machine produced  objects

o smooth surface and symmetry decrease the human choice and value

o Imperfections are essential to an object as an enhancement to the environment

Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood: critical of the materialism that accompanied modern industrialism and was  committed to creating a closer relation between arts and craft in reaction against the established  policies of the Royal Academy in England and the elevated status it accorded the fine arts (Raizman, p.  82). This brotherhood led Morris to pursue an artist-craftsman career.

Pre-Raphaelites have a long production process because the work ethos, thought process and  production is so built into their approach (relationship between art and social reform).

- Renaissance look back to the Greco-Roman and the Pre-Raphaelites reject this - Part of the renaissance model deals with rationalism and progressive culture  - Both Pre-Raphaelite (arts and crafts) and Renaissance model intersect in one way o Honor the individual

o But Raphaelites focus more on the group and social aspects on various levels - Arts and Crafts movement is painfully self-aware of what they are doing. This is not  spontaneous or intuitive art

o Artists go along with the Arts and Crafts Movement- Pre Raphaelite type of art  o Labor intensive approach to it  

o Ruskin is a huge proponent of their work  

5. Arts and Crafts Movement, Philip Webb, Backgammon Players Cabinet 1862 - Webb was also greatly influenced by John Ruskin

- Morris meets Webb while working for him and Webb later design’s Morris home - Backgammon Player has a medieval style, that reflects a castle’s roof form  - Style comes from admiring the Gothic style, like most arts and crafts designers

6. Newcomb vase (New Orleans) 1906

How it relates to the Arts and Craft Movement:

- Newcomb Ceramics work- Attached to Tulane University

- Linkage to Morris’ designs (incorporation of plant forms)  

- Mastery in the balance between negative and positive space

- Design at different junctions of the vase with large and small elements - Great contribution to the ceramics period

- Unique quality from the means of handcraft

7. Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, Poster for Moulin Rouge 1890

It exemplifies innovative printing at the end of the 19th century through its representation of the  explosion of a printing method (chromolithograph). It is a combination of the fine arts and jobbing (advertisements).

Toulouse-Lautrec is innovative with the lithograph –he explores the freedom of this medium. The poster  has a dynamic, sketch like quality – commercial but recognizably styled by Lautrec. He has an expressive  treatment of lines with simplified compositional elements.  

He becomes associated with the Avant Guard = non-traditional subject areas.

- Grinding of wheat and flower was transformed into a place for Moulin rouge (performance)  – this is a new type of social space

- The modern city begins to have new forms of entertainment

- This is a new kind of grand theater where complete strangers from all different social classes  share the same place and sit close (very different from the opera house)

- The poster advertisement has a feeling of the space

o Fantastic balance of the text and the positive and negative space

o Evocation of a modern environment

o Famous dancer and singer shown in this daring pose

o Flipping up of her skirt while doing the can-can, which is a very athletic dance o There is a fellow observer looking at the dancer

o Message is communicated well along with the sense of atmosphere of the  

performance hall

o You can see the mix of classes within the image (silhouette of observers)

o Newspaper of the Moulin rouge – you see a place for seating, but a lot of the  performance takes place on the floor with the public almost part of the act

8. Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, Poster for Lithography 1893

It exemplifies innovative printing at the end of the 19th century through its representation of the  explosion of a printing method (chromolithograph). It is a combination of the fine arts and jobbing (advertisements).

Toulouse-Lautrec is innovative with the lithograph –he explores the freedom of this medium. The poster  has a dynamic, sketch like quality – commercial but recognizably styled by Lautrec.

Toulouse-Lautrec graphics are treated like paintings

The subject of this poster is significant:

- Woman is an important collector of these prints

- Interesting that this woman is shown as a consumer, rather than a performer - She is familiar with the process. It is treated by her as a fine art object.  

- Sharp angle in floor and room - stylized of post impressionism (Van Gogh does this too)

9. Jules Cheret, Loie Fuller 1893

Cheret’s contribution to modern printing:

Cheret mastered chromolithography in England.

The composition of his posters integrated text and images on a monumental scale. He explored with the  process of chromolithography by working directly on the stone. This allowed him to create spontaneous  effects.

Cheret has a more decorative approach to his printing:

- He was interested in the physiological connection to line and color (scientific theory) - Looks at the subliminal quality of line and color to affect the viewer

- This image has upward and positive lines

- Using lithographic medium he can create an image of a suspended figure

- Also has a commercial appeal

- Invests some sub-text that has a joyful color

- Fuller is a mixed performer with modern and pop performances; her key-note dance was  her dance in naturalistic movements. She is known for her evocative movement.  

Victor Horta, Tassel House, Stairhall 1893-1894

Art Nouveau principles:

*this image was not addressed in lecture*

Additional notes:

Arts and Craft Movement= admiration of crafts from the middle ages; saw decorative arts as a vehicle  for enlightenment

- Specifically admired the Gothic because its design was based on morality and faith - Ruskin said designs should reflect the craftsman’s skill, pride and efforts

- Was against the use of machinery because it lacks the expression from the artists and made  elements too uniform

- John Ruskin,

- Augusts Pugin

- William Morris

- Burne-Jones

- Philip Webb

Aesthetic Movement = decorative forms in relation to an objects use; naturalistic forms serve as an  inspiration

- Strong influence from Owen Jones The Grammar of Ornamentation – flat, stylized, design  motifs based on naturalistic, organic forms

- Craft influence of Japan, in terms of its expressive quality/meaning

- Use of workshop manufacture  

- Christopher Dresser

Art Nouveau = aesthetic design and the unity of the arts as they took root on French soil (Raizman, pg.  120)

- It was a time when the urban life was expanding and changing

- Boulevards, bridges, public gardens, monuments etc were constructed under Napoleon III.

Art Nouveau and Posters: 

Elements of Art Nouveau were popularized using chromolithography. Posters were used to advertise  night clubs, cafes, and stores through their colorful representations. They gave a lively presence to the  walls and streets. They demonstrated the power of the simplified image, as performers could be  recognized based on their gestures or simplified attributes.

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here